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Website · Marylebone · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
MARCH
16
2017


The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 24 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

JANUARY
19
2019

 

Paddington Street, W1U
Paddington Street was once a country track leading towards Paddington. As Paddington Lane, the track followed a course between Upper and Lower Church Fields. Lower Church Field was separated from it by a hedgerow and by the early 1730s the ‘New Burial Ground’ took up much of the west side of Lower Church Field.

In the mid-to-late 1720s houses were built along the northern part of this field edge and both the New Burial Ground and the Grotto encouraged the street’s development. The western part was begun in 1772.
»read full article


JANUARY
18
2019

 

Albert Embankment, SE11
Albert Embankment was built between 1866 and 1869, under the direction of Joseph Bazalgette, over former marshlands. Like many London roads at the time, it was named for Prince Albert, Consort of Queen Victoria.
»read full article


JANUARY
17
2019

 

Ashland Place, W1U
Alongside the cemetery of Marylebone ran Burying Ground Passage which was renamed Ashland Place in 1886. Ashland Place had been begun in the 1750s. Its renaming coincided with the opening of the burial ground as a public open space and the street became more commercial rather than residential from then onwards.
»read full article


JANUARY
16
2019

 

Cromer Street, WC1H
Cromer Street originally gave access from Gray’s Inn Road to Greenland Place and a bowling green. Cromer Street was originally to be called Lucas Street but was renamed soon after its construction in 1818. The line of the future street as a path can be seen on the 1750 and 1800 maps.

Situated on the street, the Church of the Holy Cross was built by Joseph Peacock and dedicated in 1888.

After most of the original 105 houses on the street were demolished, Cromer Street was largely been rebuilt and now consists of over 1000 council and housing properties.

The Boot Tavern, on the corner of Cromer Street, was the headquarters of the Gordon rioters and later was mentioned in Charles Dickens’ book, Barnaby Rudge. It was rebuilt in 1801.
»read full article


JANUARY
15
2019

 

Brunswick Gardens, W8
Brunswick Gardens runs north from Vicarage Gate - a wide tree-lined road with white stuccoed terraces on either side. The houses have small front gardens and are mainly two storeys plus basement. They are large family houses and the street is unexpectedly quiet, although very convenient for Kensington Church Street.

The northern end of Brunswick Gardens branches to the east and this part of the street is a particularly attractive and quiet backwater.

Brunswick Gardens was part of the Sheffield House and Glebe Estate.

The plots for Nos. 1-19 Brunswick Gardens, on the west side, were leased to Henry Little by Thomas Robinson in 1858-9 and Little built the houses there.

Thomas Finlay, a Paddington builder, built Nos. 21 – 33 Brunswick Gardens between 1856 and 1862.

Nos. 35-39 (odd) were built by Jeremiah and Henry Little in 1856-7.

On the east side, the houses to appear to have been built mainly by a Paddington builder, William Lloyd Edwards. He took leases of Nos. 2-56 in 1861, with the exception of Nos. 22-32 which went to Thomas Huggett, a Kensington builder in the same year.
»read full article


JANUARY
14
2019

 

Agdon Street, EC1V
Agdon Street was originally called Woods Close. Originally Woods Close, it was a rural avenue planted with trees. Renamed Northampton Street, it became Agdon Street in 1939.

The road name commemorates the local landowners, the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned a property called Agdon in Warwickshire.

George England (1740-1788) organ builder, lived here.

In 1739, it was reported that people would customarily gather here and ask for an armed patrol to escort them over the fields in the direction of the City of London because of the prevalence of highwaymen and footpads.
»read full article


JANUARY
13
2019

 

Holly Park, N4
Holly Park, in Crouch Hill, dates from the 1870s. As late as 1854, this area was still agricultural. ’The Hollies’, east of Crouch Hill, was sold off between 1864 and 1867 in 20 plots as Holly Park but was not developed until the 1870s. By 1878 residents founded the ’Holly Park Protection Association’.

The Holly Park Methodist Church was founded in 1881 by the Rev. Morley Punshon and Sir Francis Lycett. The architect was Elijah Hoole. The church with seating for 1000 opened in 1882 - the lecture hall and school classrooms, considered by Mr.Hoole to be his best work, opened in 1886. In 1962 a modern church was erected on the
site.

The Holly Park Estate was built between 1951-2 and named after the large villas that were once there -’The Hollies’, ’Tregaron’ and others.

»read full article


JANUARY
12
2019

 

Charlotte Street, W1T
Charlotte Street was laid out in the mid 18th century on open fields. The boundaries of those original fields and an existing pattern of land ownership can still be discerned from the orientation of Rathbone Street.

Charlotte Street, started in 1763, was named in honour of Queen Charlotte who married King George III in 1761. A typical 18th century grid of streets was laid out in the area, distorted by the line of Rathbone Street and the north end of Newman Street.

The street blocks were set out in small scale domestic plots for the erection of houses. By the end of the 19th century, the area was no longer completely residential, and plots were frequently amalgamated for the erection of larger commercial and semi-industrial buildings or for the erection of mansion blocks.
»read full article


JANUARY
11
2019

 

Lee Street, N11
Lee Street was built by Southgate and Colney Hatch Gas Light and Coke Limited. Southgate and Colney Hatch Gas Light and Coke Limited built a gasworks in 1858. Lee Street and Albert Street were provided for the gas company’s workers. When Station Road was partly redeveloped in the 1970s, both Lee Street and Albert Street disappeared under the bulldozer.
»read full article


JANUARY
10
2019

 

Houghton Street, WC2A
Houghton Street is a street which has been ’demoted’ over time. In the early eighteenth century John Strype described Clare Street, Houghton Street and Holles Street as "well built and inhabited", but he also noted pockets of poverty in small courts north of the market.

The area went rapidly downhill in the years after, turning into a ’rookery’, until the rebuilding of the whole area to create Aldwych and Kingsway in 1904-5.

Having been founded in 1895, the LSE was looking to establish a campus which didn’t happen until after the First World War. The foundation stone of the London School of Economics ’Old Building’, on Houghton Street, was eventually laid by King George V in 1920 and the building was opened in 1922.

The LSE’s neighbours had been small businesses and shops such as Meakin’s the grocer at 18 Houghton Street, Lynn and Harding publishers at no. 17 and the Three Tuns public house at the corner of Houghton Street and Clement’s Inn Passage.

The largest neighbour,...
»more


JANUARY
9
2019

 

Derry and Toms
Derry & Toms was a London department store. In 1853 Joseph Toms opened a small drapery shop on Kensington High Street. In 1862 Joseph Toms joined forces with his brother-in-law, Charles Derry to set up Derry & Toms. By 1870 the business had grown to incorporate seven of the surrounding stores, with one of the buildings being used as a mourning department. The company prided itself as being the supplier of goods to the upper class of Kensington.

In 1920 John Barker & Co., the department store next door, acquired Derry & Toms. The firm already owned Pontings, which was adjacent to Derry & Toms on the other side. In 1919 Derry & Toms employed the services of poster artist F Gregory Brown to produce advertising. His advert The Daintiest of Legwear at Derry & Toms sold for £6,240 at Bonhams in 2007.

In 1930 building work was started and the new, seven-storey building on Kensington High Street opened in 1933. The building was designed by Bernard George in an Art Deco style popular at the time, and fea...
»more


JANUARY
8
2019

 

Zoar Street, SE1
Zoar Street is named after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara. Zoar was the  Dead  Sea city where Lot shel­tered - it means (in the biblical sense) ’refuge’ or ’sanctuary’.

The Zoar Chapel was built by the Baptists of Southwark in 1687. It is possible that John Bunyan preached there shortly before his death.
»read full article


JANUARY
7
2019

 

Adam and Eve Court, W1D
The court was named for the nearby Adam and Eve tavern. Medieval mystery and morality plays were acted in inn-yards on holy days, often beginning with the story of Adam and Eve.

Many such inns adopted a signboard with their distinctive costume. An Adam & Eve stood in the fields about 50 yards behind Oxford Street, approached from the road by a little lane which was built up and named Adam & Eve Court in the 1720s.
»read full article


JANUARY
6
2019

 

The Oval
The Oval is an international cricket ground in Kennington. The Oval has been the home ground of Surrey County Cricket Club since it was opened in 1845. It was the first ground in England to host international Test cricket in September 1880. The final Test match of the English season is traditionally played there.

In addition to cricket, The Oval has hosted a number of other historically significant sporting events. In 1870, it staged England’s first international football match, versus Scotland. It hosted the first FA Cup final in 1872, as well as those between 1874 and 1892. In 1876, it held both the England v Wales and England v Scotland rugby international matches, and in 1877, rugby’s first Varsity match.

Read the The Oval entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


JANUARY
5
2019

 

Chapel Street, SW1X
Chapel Street runs south-west to north-east from Belgrave Square to Grosvenor Place. Chapel Street dates from 1775 and was named after a former Lock chapel here adjacent to a hospital, both now demolished. All of the short streets connecting Belgravia to Grosvenor Place - Chapel Street, Chester Street, Halkin Street and Wilton Street, predate Thomas Cubitt’s master plan for Belgravia and were built up from the late 18th century.

24 Chapel Street was home to Brian Epstein, the manager of the Beatles. He died there on 27 August 1967 of an accidental barbiturate and alcohol overdose.
»read full article


JANUARY
4
2019

 

Chester Row, SW1W
Chester Row with its tall stucco houses lies at the heart of the district of Belgravia. The street, dating from 1840, is so named because local landowners the Grosvenors also owned land near Chester.

The Grosvenor family came into ownership of the 200 acres which became Belgravia in 1677. That year Sir Thomas Grosvenor married Mary Davies, heiress to the Manor of Ebury. Ebury’s southern part was known as The Five Fields. It was a mixture of marshland, pasture, orchards, few scattered houses and reknowned as the haunt of highwaymen.

The end of the Napoleonic Wars ushered in a housing boom. After George IV moved into Buckingham House in 1826, it was decided that the Five Fields should be developed.

Robert, 1st Marquess of Westminster, engaged estate Surveyor Thomas Cundy and master builder Thomas Cubitt to produce an elegant estate of squares, streets and crescents.

Chester Row went by a series of other names in different parts of the street before being combined into one.

»read full article


JANUARY
4
2019

 

Florence Nightingale Museum
The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas’ Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames. The museum tells the real story of Florence Nightingale, "the lady with the lamp", from her Victorian childhood to her experiences in the Crimean, through to her years as an ardent campaigner for health reform. Nightingale is recognised as the founder of modern nursing in the United Kingdom. The new museum explains her legacy and also celebrates nursing today: it is a member of The London Museums of Health & Medicine group.

In 1860, four years after her famous involvement in the Crimean War, Nightingale founded the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St. Thomas’ Hospital and the museum is located on this site.
»read full article


JANUARY
3
2019

 

Harley Street, W1G
Harley Street, the centre of private medical practices in London, was named after Thomas Harley who was Lord Mayor of London in 1767. Most of the land belonged to the Portland Estate and its successor, the Howard de Walden Estate and around 1716, a street called Chandos Street was begun. Nearby was a street called Harley Street. In 1726, it was decided to swap the names – so Harley Street became Chandos Street and Chandos Street was called Harley Street.

Along its length, there was an existing inn called the Half Way House opposite a track which led to Marylebone village.

In 1719, it was joined by a new inn called the Blue Posts which was situated where 35 Harley Street now is, on the corner of Queen Anne Street. Harley Street could not continue south for a few years since the Blue Posts was in its way.

In the financial slump that followed the South Sea Bubble, growth was slow. A pair of small houses was built in 1723 next to the Blue Posts (later 31 and 33 Harley Strteet). A bath house came next on the site of 29 Harley Street, fed by the City of London’s conduit.»more


JANUARY
2
2019

 

Gower Street, WC1E
Gower Street is named after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, the wife of John Russell, the 4th Duke of Bedford. Leveson-Gower was noted as a formidable adviser to her husband who held various political roles during the reigns of George II and George III, including Lord Privy Seal and Ambassador to France at the end of the Seven Years’ War.

The Gower baronetcy was a subsidiary title of the Duke of Sutherland, held in the Leveson-Gower family until 1963.

The area now known as Bloomsbury had come into the possession of the Russell family in 1669. That year the 5th Earl of Bedford’s son married Lady Rachel Vaughan, daughter of the 4th Earl of Southampton.

Southampton had started developing the area in the 1660s. John Russell died in 1771 and Gower Street was laid out from the 1780s onwards under Lady Gertrude’s supervision. During its development, a square was proposed near the northern end but the land was taken instead for University College London. The university was founded to provide an alternative to the Anglican-dominated colleges of Oxford...
»more


JANUARY
2
2019

 

The Space
The Space is an arts space on the Isle of Dogs. The Space is located inside a former Presbyterian church. This was built in 1859 for the Scottish Presbyterian congregation who had migrated to the Isle of Dogs to work in the shipyards. It was designed by Thomas Knightley. It was taken over by the St. Paul’s Arts Trust, headed by Robert Richardson, in 1989, and has been restored.

The Space offers many kinds of performance, including dance, drama and live music. Sir Ian McKellen became the principal patron.

The Space has established itself as a community theatre, offering free drama classes for youths from nearby schools. It is staffed mainly by volunteers.
»read full article


JANUARY
1
2019

 

Carnaby Street, W1F
Carnaby Street became the heart of Swinging London. Carnaby Street was probably laid out in 1686, deriving its name from Karnaby House, which was built in 1683 to its east. A market, Carnaby Market, opened in the 1820s.

The first Carnaby Street boutique, His Clothes, was opened by John Stephen in 1957 and was followed by I Was Lord Kitchener’s Valet, Gear and others.

By the 1960s, Carnaby Street was popular with followers of the mod and hippie styles. Many fashion designers such as Mary Quant moved to the street. Various underground music bars such as the Roaring Twenties opened in the nearby streets. Bands such as the Rolling Stones, Small Faces and The Who appeared at the Marquee Club around the corner in Wardour Street.

On 15 April 1966, Carnaby Street featured on the cover of Time magazine. The article within extolled the street’s role in Swinging London.

Carnaby Street was satirised by The Kinks in their 1966 hit ’Dedicated Follower of Fashion’: "Ev...
»more


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