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Website · Kensington · NW6 · Contributed by The Underground Map
MARCH
16
2017

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Linley Sambourne House
18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne and open as a museum. It was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844-1910).

18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. Linley Sambourne set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.

Read the Linley Sambourne House entry on the Wikipedia...

»more


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

FEBRUARY
15
2019

 

Linley Sambourne House
18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne and open as a museum. It was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne (1844-1910).

18 Stafford Terrace was an almost new townhouse when the Sambournes moved in, in 1875. Linley Sambourne set about re-decorating the house in the Aesthetic style. Today the house is a fine example of middle-class Aestheticism; its influences can still be seen permeating throughout the house, from decorative Sunflower motifs in the stained glass windows to the fine selection of William Morris wallpapers that hang within the rooms through to the displayed collection of blue-and-white Chinese import porcelain.

Read the Linley Sambourne House entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


FEBRUARY
12
2019

 

Mile End
Mile End is recorded in 1288 as ’La Mile ende’ and means ’the hamlet a mile away’. It was a mile distance from Aldgate in the City of London as reached by the London to Colchester road.

In around 1691 Mile End became known as Mile End Old Town because a new unconnected settlement to the west and adjacent to Spitalfields had taken the name Mile End New Town.

Excavations have suggested there were very few buildings before 1300.

Mile End Road moved to its present-day alignment after the foundation of Bow Bridge in 1110. In the medieval period, it was known as ‘Aldgatestrete’, as it led to the eastern entrance to the City of London at Aldgate. The area running alongside Mile End Road was known as Mile End Green, and became known as a place of assembly for Londoners, as reflected in the name of Assembly Passage.

For most of the medieval period, this road was surrounded by open fields on either side. Speculative developments existed by the end of the 16th century and continued throughout the 18th century. It ...
»more


FEBRUARY
11
2019

 

Archer Street, W1D
Archer Street was Arch Street in 1675, Orchard Street in 1720 and Archer Street by 1746. In Colonel Panton’s building petition of 1671, Archer Street first appears as a "short street leading from out of Windmill Street over against Windmill Yard towards St. Giles." Before 1836, the street came to an abrupt end at the eastern boundary of Panton’s ground. It was connected to Rupert Street by a narrow passage through a stable yard. But in 1836, the stable buildings had been demolished and Archer Street extended to Rupert Street.

Archer Street was lined for the most part with modest houses. Old photographs showed a pair of small cottages dating from about 1700.

So far, a normal Soho street history.

But in the twentieth century, Archer Street became known as a meeting point for West End musicians. The street became this hub due to its proximity to work places (nearby theatres and clubs) and places to drink and socialise.

The Apollo and The Lyric both had stage doors which opened onto the street. Meanwhile, the M...
»more


FEBRUARY
10
2019

 

Belsize Avenue, NW3
Belsize Avenue was once the driveway to the former Belsize House. Before suburbanisation the main drive leading to Belsize House (c.1500-1853) corresponded with the line of the present Belsize Avenue. The house itself had a substantial courtyard form and was surrounded by extensive gardens with views over London to the south. The surrounding land was in agricultural production with a combination of arable land and pasture supplying the capital.

Belsize Avenue was the scene of 18th century traffic jams when the grounds were used as a pleasure garden. Until 1835 a five-barred gate closed the east end of Belsize Avenue.

In 1852 Charles James Palmer, a Bloomsbury solicitor, bought the lease of Belsize House, with the intention of building. The Dean and Chapter of Westminster decided to retain control of the Avenue, keeping it undeveloped and so Palmer had to change his building layout plans.

A temporary fire station was established in Belsize Avenue during 1869, and in 1870 the Dean and Chapter finally gave...
»more


FEBRUARY
9
2019

 

Boxall Road, SE21
Boxall Road was formerly Boxall Row. In about 1773, wheelwright John Shaw and builder William Levens built six brick houses at the eastern end (starting with a wheelwright’s shop), for Robert Boxall, lessee of ’The Greyhound’ Inn. The road was gradually extended westward, to link up with Turney Road in the late 1870s.

Dulwich Village was expanding rapidly by the late 1870s and this brought work for gardeners, cooks and other occupations that tended to the needs of the wealthy. There was an increasing shortage of accommodation for the low-paid.

One of the Governors of Dulwich College therefore set up the Dulwich Cottage Company Ltd (DCCL) to provide low rental housing for those who attended to the richer homes of Dulwich. It acquired land from Dulwich College Estate that faced onto Boxall Row.

Cottages in Boxall Road were designed by Charles Barry Jnr, architect to the Dulwich Estate, in the ’Dutch/German’ style designed to blend in with the character o...
»more


FEBRUARY
8
2019

 

Soho Square, W1D
In its early years, Soho Square was one of the most fashionable places to live in London. Soho Square is a public park within a sqaure leased by the Soho Square Garden Committee to Westminster City council.

The original name was King Square (after Charles II) and a statue of the ’Merry Monarch’ has stood in the square since 1681.

The development lease to convert the surrounding fields, for ​53 years and four months, was granted in 1677 to Richard Frith, elector of the Corporation of London and bricklayer.

In 1778, the naturalist Joseph Banks of 32 Soho Square was elected president of the Royal Society and his home hosted scientists visiting from around the world.

Between 1778 and 1801 the Square was home to the infamous White House brothel at the Manor House, 21 Soho Square.

A sequence of house rebuilding and renovation began in the 1730s, when many of the houses built in the 1670s and 1680s were becoming dilapidated and old fashioned, continued for over a century. Between 1880 and 1...
»more


FEBRUARY
7
2019

 

Choumert Square, SE15
Choumert Square is reputedly London’s smallest square. Choumert Square consists of small Victorian houses that were infilled a garden of a Rye Lane house in the c 1870s.

It is now a car-free cul-de-sac off of Choumert Grove and was built as a row of one-bedroom cottages without back gardens. Each cottage has a small front garden which are generally well-tended.

While called a ’square’, it is more of a lane which has a community of residents which opens itself for a summer Open Day once every year.


»read full article


FEBRUARY
6
2019

 

Agar Place, NW1
Agar Place is a survivor of Agar Town. The stretch of countryside between the future site of Agar Place and the future site of King’s Cross Station was leased by ’Counsellor’ William Agar, QC in 1816.

A quarter of a century later, he started to cover his fields with tightly-packed rows of two- and four-roomed workers’ cottages. Agar Town, as it became known, turned into a notorious slum area, crowded with the poor of St Giles whose homes were destroyed when New Oxford Street was formed. Agar Town was built over in turn by the Midland Railway.

Agar Place stood slightly apart from the rest of Agar Town and survives to this day.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
5
2019

 

Agar Grove, NW1
Formerly known as St Paul’s Road, the name Agar Grove dates from the early 20th century. Agar Grove was called after William Agar an irascible lawyer who lived in Camden. Having also been the name and the brains behind the squalid Agar Town, he opposed Regent’s Canal going through his land. Agar Town disappeared when the next transport revolution - the Midland Railway - arrived in the area.

Although there was some development in Agar Grove during the 1840s, the majority of houses date from the 1860s - mostly semi-detached villas on a similar scale and design to houses in nearby St Augustine’s Road and Cantelowes Road.

Modern, post war housing is now very much an additional feature of Agar Grove.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
4
2019

 

Balaclava Road, KT6
Balaclava Road was set out by Charles Adams, a local builder. Houses in Balaclava Road began to be built in 1894. Charles Adams erected 17 villas in three phases between 1894 and 1898, with the houses of each phase being of the same design.

A group of five houses at the western end of Balaclava Road were the final works of Charles Adams, who commissioned local architect Alfred Mason to design the five detached villas for him. Other local examples of Mason’s work are the Surbiton Assembly Rooms.

After 1905 there was no further building activity in the area until the 1930s when infill development took place at the eastern end of Balaclava Road.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
3
2019

 

Callcott Street, W8
Callcott Street is a small street between Uxbridge Street and Hillgate Place. The area itself is sometimes known as ‘Hillgate Village’. The houses are small terraced Victorian houses one two floors plus basements, and are painted in a multitude of colours from dark blue to light green.

The street is tree-lined and has a village feel to it. At the end of the street is a small old-fashioned neighbourhood pub called the Uxbridge Arms.

It was part of the estate known as The Racks. Then William Johnson and Joseph Clutterbuck began turning what had been a brickfield into a residential area.

Clutterbuck died in about 1851 having made a start on development, using other builders to carry out the work. William Johnson continued selling off plots. Over 200 houses were built in the following decade, with a large number of individual builders constructing a few houses each.

Clutterbuck, or builders appointed by him, were responsible for the construction of houses in Calcott Street (formerly William Street).
»read full article


FEBRUARY
2
2019

 

Red Lion Court, EC4A
Red Lion Court forms part of labyrinth of little passages behind the shops on the north side of Fleet Street. Although many of the old buildings have been replaced by modern structures these age-old byways hold a great deal of history and provide for a very satisfying stroll away from the hustle and bustle of Fleet Street.

The narrow passage of Red Lion Court branches from Fleet Street. A little way along, the passage widens out and here, until quite recently, stood the Red Lion tavern – after which the Court was named. There has been a tavern in Red Lion Court since 1575 but unfortunately the long establishment came to an end when redevelopment encompassed the area. Just past the site of the tavern a right left kink leads to Pemberton Row where an arrow on the wall points right, under an archway, to Dr Johnson’s House in Gough Square.

As the Great Fire approached Red Lion Court, on its westward progression, it came up against a brick built house which gave the City fire fighters that much needed time to demolish buildings further along the way. By creating a...
»more


FEBRUARY
1
2019

 

Pageantmaster Court, EC4M
Pageantmaster Court was Ludgate Court and renamed in the summer of 1993. One of the final bombsites to survive in the City of London, the existing Queen’s Head pub had until that fatal day in 1940 the Queen’s Head had the company of the Blue Last tavern in Ludgate Broadway, the Ventura Restaurant and a philatelists shop.

The Roman Lud Gate was situated a few metres from the later Pageantmaster Court. Lud-Gate was the last and most westerly of the gates. The gate was far from small but compared with its counterparts was probably one of the minor ways into the City. During the Roman occupation of the City there would have been a stone bath just inside the wall where those with right of entry could clean off the grime of the dusty road from the west.

London’s Roman wall, along with all the gates, was demolished in 1760 and no evidence remains of either Ludgate or any of the other five gates.
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