The Underground Map


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Belgravia ·
October
19
2019

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Victoria Coach Station
Victoria Coach Station is the largest coach station in London. It serves as a terminus for many medium- and long-distance coach services in the United Kingdom and is also the departure point for many countryside coach tours originating from London.

Victoria Coach Station was opened at its present site in Buckingham Palace Road in 1932, by London Coastal Coaches, a consortium of coach operators. The building is in a distinctive Art Deco style, the architects for which were Wallis, Gilbert and Partners. In 1970 the coach operators’ association which managed the station became a subsidiary of the National Bus Company.

In 1988, ownership of Victoria Coach Station Limited was transferred to London Transport. In 2000, Transport for London was formed and took over the station.

The freeholder of the site, Grosvenor Group, announced in 2013 that it wishes to redevelop the site and relocate the station elsewhere in London. However, the building was listed at Grade II by English Heritage in 2014.

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Featured articles

JULY
31
2019

 

Alderney Street, SW1V
Alderney Street was originally Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner. The Stanley family owned a plot of land here for centuries - hence the Stanley Arms in Lupus Street and Stanley Place. Streets of this name were so numerous in London that it had to be changed.

The streetname was changed to ’Alderley Street’ in 1879, still in honour of the Stanley of Alderley family. The family seemed not to be pleased with this change and so the name was changed once again.
»read full article


JULY
30
2019

 

St Mary Abbots
St Mary Abbots is a church located on Kensington High Street and the corner of Kensington Church Street in London W8. The present church structure was built in 1872 and designed by the celebrated architect Sir George Gilbert Scott, combining neo-Gothic and early-English styles. This edifice remains noted for having the tallest spire in London and is the latest in a series on the site since the beginning of the 12th century.

The church is listed Grade II* on the National Heritage List for England.


Read the St Mary Abbots entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


JULY
25
2019

 

Playford Road, N4
Playford Road was built in 1869/1870. Playford Road was originally Palmerston Road and name after Henry John Temple, 3rd Viscount Palmerston, (1784-1865), Prime Minister, February 1855 to February 1858 and from 1859 to November 1865.

However Playford Road itself commemorates John Playford (1623-86) who had a 20 roomed house in Islington High Street. His wife kept a
boarding school for young ladies, opposite to the parish church. His son was baptised there on 6 October 1665. In 1650-1 appeared his ’The English Dancing Master, or Plaine and Easie Rules for the Dancing of Country Dances, with the Time to Each Dance’. This work ran to no less than 18 editions up to 1725.

Clifton Court was built in Playford Road during 1968.

»read full article


JULY
24
2019

 

Walbrook Wharf
Walbrook Wharf is an operating freight wharf located in the City of London adjacent to Cannon Street station. It is used as a waste transfer station owned by the City of London Corporation and operated by Cory Environmental. Refuse from central London is transferred onto barges for transport to the Belvedere Incinerator in the London Borough of Bexley.

Walbrook Wharf was formerly arranged as a dock, but modern containerised loading has resulted in the infilling of the dock. The wharf is the point where the ancient stream, the Walbrook fed into the Thames, a location also known as Dowgate.
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JULY
22
2019

 

Clarendon Crecent, W9
Clarendon Crescent was said to be the longest road in London without a turning. By 1861 Desborough Lodge and Westbourne Farm had been demolished and Clarendon Street, Woodchester Street and Cirencester Street were build on their lands.

There was a rapid social decline in the streets between the railway and the canal. Subletting to weekly lodgers had made Brindley Street the most overcrowded in Paddington, with over 3 people to a room. By 1869, when the worst areas were near the canal basin at Paddington Green.

Clarendon Street (later Crescent) had 17 people per house on average. In Clarendon Street "where the more respectable women did laundry work, there were thieves and prostitutes". Subletting had gone so far that a room might have different tenants by day and by night and could only be controlled by declaring buildings to be lodging houses. Such decay was attributed in 1899 to the canal, as elsewhere in London, to isolation arising from a lack of through traffic, and to the density of building.

The road was renamed...
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JULY
21
2019

 

Aste Street, E14
Aste Street is a short street which once connected the western ends of Roffey Street and Judkin Street. There had been a housing boom in Cubitt Town which finished in 1867. A housing slump continued for over a decade before a revival of activity during the 1880s.

In 1882 the Millwall Dock Company produced a plan to set out Aste Street, Judkin Street, Muggeridge Street and Roffey Street in an area behind East Ferry Road. The plan was approved but barely carried out as planned with only ten houses being built in Judkin Street.

Muggeridge, Roffey and Aste Streets were not started by 1902. Muggeridge Street was abandoned in 1904 and in 1908 it was agreed that much of Roffey Street and Aste Street would not continue as planned.

Aste Street is now a street with modern housing in keeping with the Canary Wharf style.
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JULY
19
2019

 

Monza Street, E1W
Monza Street lies south of the Shadwell Basin. Shadwell Basin was formerly part of the London Docks and nowadays is one the most significant bodies of water surviving from the historical period.

Monza Street was originally called Star Street and, like other nearby streets, contained small chandlers and other maritime shops.

As Fiona Rule notes in ’London’s Docklands: A History of the Lost Quarter’, by the 1880s, most of the shops had disappeared and in Star Street, lightermen advertised their services on small brass plaques fixed to the front doors of their homes.
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JULY
18
2019

 

Woodcote Valley Road, CR8
Woodcote Valley Road falls within the boundary of William Webb’s Garden Estate at Woodcote. The Webb Estate was built by William Webb from 1898. Webb was a local estate agent and spent his lifetime developing his Garden Estate idea.

He designed Woodcote Valley Road to lead to his 1903 model village, Upper Woodcote Village, in the south-western corner of the Webb Estate.

At the centre is a four acre green.

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JULY
17
2019

 

Blythe House
Blythe House is a listed building located at 23 Blythe Road. Blythe House was built between 1899 and 1903 as the main office of the Post Office Savings Bank, which had outgrown its previous headquarter in Queen Victoria Street. By 1902 the Bank had 12,000 branches and more than 9 million accounts.

Blythe House included a post office intended to deal with the official correspondence involved in the work of the Savings Bank. The post office handled about 100,000 letters every working day.

In 1963 the government announced that the Bank’s main centre of operations would be moved to Glasgow. A small headquarters staff remained in London, moving to Charles House on Kensington High Street. The Bank finally left Blythe House in the early 1970s.
»read full article


JULY
16
2019

 

Trafalgar Street, W6
Trafalgar Street was a small street in Hammersmith, off Aspen Place. The ’Creek’ area was said to be the worst slum in west London. The 1891 census recorded very cramped conditions with 213 people living in the 22 houses of Trafalgar Street.

The Creek was once a picturesque inlet of the Thames and was spanned by a wooden bridge called the High Bridge. At the High Bridge, four old footpaths converged - two on the east: the Lower Mall and Aspen Place and two on the west: the Upper Mall and Bridge Street. Aspen Place, which Trafalgar Street lay off of, seems to have been known by a variety of names at different periods as Ship Lane, Pingsworth Lane and Cutthroat Lane.

How long a bridge existed at this spot is difficult to say. There was certainly one as early as 1541. The bridge was repaired by Bishop Howley in 1820, and again by Bishop Blomfield in 1837.

The eastern bank of the creek became occupied by wharves.

The 1800 map shows the site of Trafalgar Street as an open field. The name sugge...
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JULY
15
2019

 

Lakeside Road, W14
Lakeside Road was built on the site of artificial lakes formed by local brickworks. Black Bull Ditch (or Parr’s Ditch) was first mentioned in 1493 as a man-made tributary of the Stamford Brook, flowing into the Thames south of Chancellor’s Wharf where it formed the boundary between Hammersmith and Fulham.

The hamlet of Brook Green, around the ditch, was established by the 16th century, originating as an outlying farm of a manor. It was largely marshland with the brook running through, and where an annual fair was held until 1823.

Nearer to the River Thames, the good soil enabled farmers to grow soft fruits such as gooseberries, red currants, raspberries and strawberries which were taken by boat to sell at Covent Garden market.

Further from the Thames during the early 19th century a considerable amount of the local farmland was turned over to the creation of brickfields. The clay soil provided good building materials for London as it continued to expand westwards. Many ponds and lakes were formed as a result of this a...
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JULY
14
2019

 

St Gregory by St Paul’s
St Gregory’s by St Paul’s was a parish church in the Castle Baynard ward of the City of London. The church was dedicated to St Gregory the Great. It was in existence by 1010, when the body of St Edmund was housed there. The remains of the king, martyred in 870, had been translated to London from Bury St Edmunds by Alwyn, later Bishop of Elmham, for safe-keeping during a period of Danish raids, and were returned there three years later. The patronage of the church originally belonged to the crown, but during the reign of Henry VI it was transferred to the minor canons of St Paul’s.

Between June and November 1571, services were transferred from St Paul’s to St Gregory’s while fire damage was being repaired in the cathedral.

On 19 December 1591, Elizabeth Baldry, wife of the 2nd Baron Rich and mother-in-law to Penelope Devereux, Lady Rich, was buried at St Gregory’s.

The existence of the church came under threat while Inigo Jones was remodelling the cathedral in the 17th century. At first he thought that he could accommodate St G...
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JULY
11
2019

 

Belmont Road, UB8
Belmont Road was the original site for Uxbridge station. Uxbridge Common was enclosed in the 17th century to provide sites for country residences. Blue House or Belmont on the Common, west of the Harefield Road, was built in the late 17th century. The name for the house became the name for the road which was built to connect the Common with the town centre.

Uxbridge was a major centre for Quakers since 1658. The Friends Meeting House on the corner of Belmont Road and York Road dates from 1817 but this had replaced the original 1692 Meeting House on this site.

Also in the road, the Uxbridge Lancasterian or British School was a school for children ’of all labouring people or mechanics’ based in the Uxbridge Market House until premises in Belmont Road were erected in 1816.

Victorian housing became established in the road with building stretching from the Uxbridge end.

At the end of the nineteenth century, the Harrow and Uxbridge Railway Company was established under the auspice...
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JULY
10
2019

 

Passmore Edwards Public Library
The Passmore Edwards Public Library on the Uxbridge Road, Shepherd’s Bush, was built in 1895 and funded by the journalist and philanthropist Passmore Edwards. It is one of a number of public libraries that still bear his name today. In 2008 a new library was built in Shepherd’s Bush, part of the substantial Westfield London development, and the Passmore Edwards library fell into disuse. In October 2011 it re-opened as the new home of the Bush Theatre.


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JULY
8
2019

 

Barclay Road, SW6
Barclay Road runs from Fulham Road to the rails of the District Line. The history of Barclay Road is linked with that of Fulham, and later Walham Green. Originally part of Fulham Fields, and from Norman times the Manor of Fulham, it remained sparsely populated and predominantly involved in agriculture.

By 1706 this part of Fulham was being described as "a village in which lives a considerable number of people, mostly gardeners, whose kitchen greens, plants, herbs, roots and flowers dayly supply Westminster and Covent Gardens. Here are no houses of considerable note."

In 1813, Thomas Faulkner describes this part of Fulham as the "great kitchen garden, north of the Thames for supplying London". There were orchards of apples, pears, cherries, plums and walnuts, with soft fruit such as raspberries and gooseberries grown in between the trees. Once vegetable growing became more profitable, many orchards were replaced and land given over to vegetables. The market gardeners often cultivated a succession of crops throughout the yea...
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JULY
4
2019

 

Bishop’s Wood
Together with Winnington Road, Ingram Avenue and the reknowned Bishop’s Avenue, the wood was named after Arthur Winnington-Ingram, who as Bishop of London owned much of the surrounding area following a land grant in 704 AD. Bishop’s Wood, with one further to the north called Mutton Wood, and another to the west known as Wild Wood, was a portion of the great wood attached to the estate and castle of the Bishop of London, at Highgate.

In 1755 it was purchased by Lord Mansfield, and left as a wild copse, strictly preserved as a cover for game.

Most of the land was sold privately in the early 20th century.
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JULY
3
2019

 

Woodcock Dell Farm
’Woodcock’ is derived from the old English word ’Woodcot’ meaning a dweller at a cottage in or near a farm. Woodcock Hill (Lane) is the road leading south from the crossroad of Kenton Lane and Kenton Road.

Before 1930, a footpath was an alternative route to using Woodcock Hill Lane. It reached the location of Woodcock Dell, and then across fields to Harrow on the Hill - now the route of The Ridgeway and Northwick Avenue.

Woodcock Dell with its pond, by the time it came to adjoin the Metropolitan Railway, was a pig farm. A small ’cattle creep’ went under the nearby railway line in the direction of what is now Windermere Avenue.

Woodcock Dell Farm was demolished in the 1930s to make way for a new residential estate built by Costin, and Comben and Wakeling.
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JULY
2
2019

 

Boyle Street, W1S
Boyle Street was built on a piece of land called the Ten Acres to discharge some Boyle family debts. The Boyle family were the Earls of Burlington who held land rather than had money.

Jabez Collier, a lawyer, suggested that part of the Ten Acres, also known as Crabtree Field, which the Burlingtons used as a garden should be given over to building leases. In January 1718, Lord Burlington submitted a Bill in the House of Lords to permit him to grant building leases of the part of the Ten Acres lying behind Burlington-House Garden. On this piece of ground were built Boyle Street, Cork Street, Clifford Street, Old Burlington Street and some houses in New Bond Street.

The street runs east-west from the junction of the Coach and Horses Yard and Old Burlington Street, to Savile Row. Although mainly offices now, the street once had houses and the Burlington Charity Schoolhouse, built about 1720.
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JULY
1
2019

 

Northwick Park
Northwick Park is a park, suburb and tube station. The park was originally an estate which was part of Sheepcote Farm and named after its lord, Northwick. Middlesex County Council acquired 192 acres in the 1930s to create public land. The amount of public open space has since diminished, partly due to the building of Northwick Park Hospital.

The Metropolitan Railway run their lines through here in 1880 but the station opened only in 1923 as the suburbs was built.

Kenton station on the Bakerloo line and London Overground is within walking distance.
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