West Brompton

Underground station, existing between 1869 and now

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Underground station · West Brompton · SW5 ·
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West Brompton is a Network Rail West London Line and London Overground and Underground (District Line) station in west London.


It is located on Old Brompton Road immediately south of Earls Court Exhibition Centre.

The name refers to the older locality of Brompton to the east, although the areas of South Kensington and Earl's Court separate West Brompton from its namesake. Whilst in the early part of the 20th century, the whole area between Knightsbridge and here would have been known as Brompton, modern-day locals would not recognise Brompton and West Brompton as geographically contiguous. Today it still has its own Royal Mail London postcode of SW10 (though that also covers part of Chelsea).

On 12 April 1869, the Metropolitan District Railway (MDR, now the District Line) opened its own station as the terminus and only station on its extension from Gloucester Road station (Earl's Court station did not open until 1871). On 1 March 1880, the MDR opened an extension south from West Brompton to Putney Bridge.

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THE STREETS OF WEST BROMPTON
West Cromwell Road, SW5 West Cromwell Road is one of the streets of London in the SW5 postal area.



Mary Harris
Mary Harris   
Added: 19 Dec 2017 17:12 GMT   
IP: 217.63.194.106
2:1:113
Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

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LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 11 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:2:113
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.
Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=14542

LDNnews
LDNnews   
Added: 8 Oct 2019 15:27 GMT   
IP:
3:3:113
Post by LDNnews: Aldwych
The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.
The Cape Nursery once lay along the south side of Shepherd’s Bush Green.

https://www.theundergroundmap.com/article.html?id=51473

VIEW THE WEST BROMPTON AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WEST BROMPTON AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE WEST BROMPTON AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE WEST BROMPTON AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE WEST BROMPTON AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

West Brompton

West Brompton is a Network Rail West London Line and London Overground and Underground (District Line) station in west London.

It is located on Old Brompton Road immediately south of Earls Court Exhibition Centre.

The name refers to the older locality of Brompton to the east, although the areas of South Kensington and Earl's Court separate West Brompton from its namesake. Whilst in the early part of the 20th century, the whole area between Knightsbridge and here would have been known as Brompton, modern-day locals would not recognise Brompton and West Brompton as geographically contiguous. Today it still has its own Royal Mail London postcode of SW10 (though that also covers part of Chelsea).

On 12 April 1869, the Metropolitan District Railway (MDR, now the District Line) opened its own station as the terminus and only station on its extension from Gloucester Road station (Earl's Court station did not open until 1871). On 1 March 1880, the MDR opened an extension south from West Brompton to Putney Bridge.
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