Vauxhall

Underground station, existing between 1848 and now

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Underground station · Vauxhall · SW8 ·
November
4
2013

Vauxhall is an inner city area of Central London in the London Borough of Lambeth.

Vauxhall Cross transport exchange (2005)
Credit: Fin Fahey
It is generally accepted that the etymology of Vauxhall is from the name of Falkes de Breauté, the head of King John's mercenaries, who owned a large house in the area, which was referred to as Faulke's Hall, later Foxhall, and eventually Vauxhall.

There is no mention of Vauxhall in the 1086 Domesday Book. The area formed part of the extensive Manor of South Lambeth. From various accounts three local roads, the South Lambeth Road, Clapham Road (previously called Merton Road) and Wandsworth Road (previously called Kingston Road) were ancient and well known routes to and from London. The area was flat and marshy with parts poorly drained by ditches. The area only started to be developed in the mid 18th century. Prior to this it provided market garden produce for the nearby City of London.

The area only became generally known by this name when the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens opened as a public attraction. Initially most visitors would have approached by river, but crowds of Londoners of all classes came to know the area after the construction of Westminster Bridge in the 1740s.

There are competing theories as to why the Russian word for a central railway station is vokzal, which coincides with the 19th-century transliteration of Vauxhall. It has long been suggested that a Russian delegation visited the area to inspect the construction of the London and South Western Railway in 1840, and mistook the name of the station for the generic name of the building type. The locality of the L&SWR's original railway terminus, Nine Elms Station, was shown boldly and simply as Vauxhall in the 1841 Bradshaw timetable.

Another likely explanation is that the first Russian railway, constructed in 1837, ran from Saint Petersburg via Tsarskoye Selo to Pavlovsk Palace, where extensive Pleasure Gardens had earlier been established. In 1838 a music and entertainment pavilion was constructed at the railway terminus. This pavilion was called the Vokzal in homage to the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens in London. The name soon came to be applied to the station itself, which was the gateway that most visitors used to enter the gardens. It later came to mean any substantial railway station building.

It has also given its name to the Vauxhall Motors car manufacturer, which originated in the area.

Vauxhall station was opened by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) as 'Vauxhall Bridge Station' on 11 July 1848 when the main line was extended from Nine Elms to Waterloo, then 'Waterloo Bridge Station'. It is on a viaduct with eight platforms. The deep tube London Underground station is on the Victoria line, and opened on 23 July 1971.

Vauxhall was located next to a major creamery and milk bottling plant for United Dairies. Milk trains from all over the West Country would stop at Clapham Junction in the evening, and reduce their length by half so that they did not block Vauxhall station while unloading. They would then proceed to Vauxhall, and pull into the down side platform, where a discharge pipe was provided to the creamery on the other side of the road. There was also pedestrian access from below the station, under the road to the depot, in the tunnel where the pipeline ran. Unloaded trains would then proceed to Waterloo, where they would reverse and return to Clapham Junction to pick up the other half of the train. The procedure was then repeated, so that the entire milk train was unloaded between the end of evening peak traffic and the start of the following morning.


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Vauxhall Cross transport exchange (2005)
Fin Fahey

THE STREETS OF VAUXHALL
Albert Embankment, SW8 Albert Embankment is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Andrew Place, SW8 Andrew Place is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Ascalon Street, SW8 Ascalon Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Auckland Street, SE11 Auckland Street is a continuation of Glyn Street.
Battersea Park Road, SW8 Battersea Park Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Bedser Close, SE11 Bedser Close is named for Alec Bedser, widely regarded as one of the best English cricketers of the 20th century, by association with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground.
Belmore Street, SW8 Belmore Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Blore Close, SW8 Blore Close is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Bondway, SW8 Bondway is named after the late 18th century developers of the street, John and Sarah Bond.
Bonnington Square, SW8 Bonnington Square was built in the 1870s to house railway workers.
Bradmead, SW8 Bradmead is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Bridgefoot, SW8 Bridgefoot is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Brooklands Passage, SW8 Brooklands Passage is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Brooks Court, SW8 Brooks Court is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Carey Gardens, SW8 Carey Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Christchurch Vicarage, SW8 Christchurch Vicarage is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Clyston Street, SW8 Clyston Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Condell Road, SW8 Condell Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Corunna Road, SW8 Corunna Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Cowthorpe Road, SW8 Cowthorpe Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Crimsworth Road, SW8 Crimsworth Road is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Cringle Street, SW11 A street within the SW8 postcode
Cringle Street, SW1V Cringle Street is a road in the SW1V postcode area
Cringle Street, SW8 Cringle Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Deeley Road, SW8 Deeley Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Durham Street, SE11 Durham Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Ebbisham Drive, SW8 Ebbisham Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Farnham Royal, SE11 Farnham Royal is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Flower Market, SW8 Flower Market is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Fount Street, SW8 Fount Street is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Fruit And Vegetable Market, SW8 Fruit And Vegetable Market is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Fruit Vegetable Market, SW8 Fruit Vegetable Market is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Glyn Street, SE11 Glyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Goding Street, SE11 Goding Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Goldsboro Road, SW8 Goldsboro Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Goldsborough House Springfield Estate, SW8 Goldsborough House Springfield Estate is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Harleyford Road, SE11 Harleyford Road was named after local leaseholders the Claytons, whose country house was Harleyford Manor, Buckinghamshire.
Havelock Terrace Arches, SW8 Havelock Terrace Arches is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Havelock Terrace, SW8 Havelock Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Hookham Court, SW8 Hookham Court is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Imex Business Centre, SW8 Imex Business Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Imex Centre, SW8 Imex Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Kirtling Street, SW8 Kirtling Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Knight’s Walk, SE11 Knight’s Walk is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Langley Lane, SW8 Langley Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Laud Street, SE11 Laud Street is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Lawn Lane, SW8 Lawn Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Linford Street, SW8 Linford Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Lockington Road, SW8 Lockington Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Market Towers, SW8 Market Towers is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Miles Street, SW8 Miles Street was developed from 1778 onwards by the Sarah and John Bond.
New Covent Garden Centre, SW8 New Covent Garden Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
New Union Square, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Oval Way, SE11 Oval Way is a road in the SE11 postcode area
Pagden Street, SW8 Pagden Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Palmerston Way, SW8 Palmerston Way is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Park Place, SW8 Park Place is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Parry Street, SW8 Parry Street was laid out by John and Sarah Bond.
Patmore Street, SW8 Patmore Street is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Ponton Road, SW8 Ponton Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Riverlight 4 Riverlight Quay, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Riverlight Quay 8Ea, SW11 A street within the postcode
Riverlight Quay, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Rudolf Place, SW8 Rudolf Place is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Savona Street, SW8 Savona Street is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Sleaford Industrial Estate, SW8 Sleaford Industrial Estate is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Sleaford Street, SW8 Sleaford Street is virtually the last of the surviving streets of Battersea New Town.
South Lambeth Place, SW8 South Lambeth Place links South Lambeth Road to Bondway.
Southville, SW8 Southville is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
St George Wharf, SW8 St George Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
St Oswalds Place, SE11 St Oswalds Place is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
St. Georges Close, SW8 St. Georges Close is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Stanley Close, SW8 Stanley Close is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Stewart Court, SW8 Stewart Court is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Stewart’s Road, SW8 This is a street in the SW8 postcode area
Stewarts Road, SW8 Stewarts Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Studios, N1 Studios is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
The Pavilion, SW8 The Pavilion is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Thessaly Road, SW8 Thessaly Road is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Thorparch Road, SW8 Thorparch Road is a road in the SW8 postcode area
Tideway Walk, SW11 A street within the SW8 postcode
Tun Yard, SW8 Tun Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Tyers Terrace, SE11 Tyers Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Vauxhall Cross, SW8 Vauxhall Cross is now known as the site of the MI5 headquarters.
Vauxhall Grove, SW8 Vauxhall Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Vauxhall Street, SE11 Vauxhall Street is one of the streets of London in the SE11 postal area.
Wadhurst Road, SW8 Wadhurst Road is a road in the SW8 postcode area
West Bridge, SW8 West Bridge is one of the streets of London in the SW8 postal area.
Westminster Business Square, SE11 Westminster Business Square is a business centre.



 

Vauxhall

Vauxhall is an inner city area of Central London in the London Borough of Lambeth.

It is generally accepted that the etymology of Vauxhall is from the name of Falkes de Breauté, the head of King John's mercenaries, who owned a large house in the area, which was referred to as Faulke's Hall, later Foxhall, and eventually Vauxhall.

There is no mention of Vauxhall in the 1086 Domesday Book. The area formed part of the extensive Manor of South Lambeth. From various accounts three local roads, the South Lambeth Road, Clapham Road (previously called Merton Road) and Wandsworth Road (previously called Kingston Road) were ancient and well known routes to and from London. The area was flat and marshy with parts poorly drained by ditches. The area only started to be developed in the mid 18th century. Prior to this it provided market garden produce for the nearby City of London.

The area only became generally known by this name when the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens opened as a public attraction. Initially most visitors would have approached by river, but crowds of Londoners of all classes came to know the area after the construction of Westminster Bridge in the 1740s.

There are competing theories as to why the Russian word for a central railway station is vokzal, which coincides with the 19th-century transliteration of Vauxhall. It has long been suggested that a Russian delegation visited the area to inspect the construction of the London and South Western Railway in 1840, and mistook the name of the station for the generic name of the building type. The locality of the L&SWR's original railway terminus, Nine Elms Station, was shown boldly and simply as Vauxhall in the 1841 Bradshaw timetable.

Another likely explanation is that the first Russian railway, constructed in 1837, ran from Saint Petersburg via Tsarskoye Selo to Pavlovsk Palace, where extensive Pleasure Gardens had earlier been established. In 1838 a music and entertainment pavilion was constructed at the railway terminus. This pavilion was called the Vokzal in homage to the Vauxhall Pleasure Gardens in London. The name soon came to be applied to the station itself, which was the gateway that most visitors used to enter the gardens. It later came to mean any substantial railway station building.

It has also given its name to the Vauxhall Motors car manufacturer, which originated in the area.

Vauxhall station was opened by the London and South Western Railway (LSWR) as 'Vauxhall Bridge Station' on 11 July 1848 when the main line was extended from Nine Elms to Waterloo, then 'Waterloo Bridge Station'. It is on a viaduct with eight platforms. The deep tube London Underground station is on the Victoria line, and opened on 23 July 1971.

Vauxhall was located next to a major creamery and milk bottling plant for United Dairies. Milk trains from all over the West Country would stop at Clapham Junction in the evening, and reduce their length by half so that they did not block Vauxhall station while unloading. They would then proceed to Vauxhall, and pull into the down side platform, where a discharge pipe was provided to the creamery on the other side of the road. There was also pedestrian access from below the station, under the road to the depot, in the tunnel where the pipeline ran. Unloaded trains would then proceed to Waterloo, where they would reverse and return to Clapham Junction to pick up the other half of the train. The procedure was then repeated, so that the entire milk train was unloaded between the end of evening peak traffic and the start of the following morning.
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