Florence Nightingale Museum

Museum in/near Waterloo, existing between 1989 and now

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Museum · Waterloo · SE1 · Contributed by The Underground Map
JANUARY
4
2019

The Florence Nightingale Museum is located at St Thomas’ Hospital, which faces the Palace of Westminster across the River Thames.


The museum tells the real story of Florence Nightingale, "the lady with the lamp", from her Victorian childhood to her experiences in the Crimean, through to her years as an ardent campaigner for health reform. Nightingale is recognised as the founder of modern nursing in the United Kingdom. The new museum explains her legacy and also celebrates nursing today: it is a member of The London Museums of Health & Medicine group.

In 1860, four years after her famous involvement in the Crimean War, Nightingale founded the Nightingale Training School for nurses at St. Thomas’ Hospital and the museum is located on this site.

Source: Wikipedia



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Christobel Warren-Jones
Christobel Warren-Jones   
Added: 26 Feb 2018 13:50 GMT   
IP: 143.159.49.39
2:1:2692
Post by Christobel Warren-Jones: Hurley Road, SE11

Hurley Road was off Kennington Lane, just west of Renfrew Raod, not where indicated on this map. My Dad was born at number 4 in 1912. It no longer exists but the name is remembered in Hurley House, Hurley Clinic and Hurley Pre-School

Pauline jones
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   
IP: 86.136.68.202
2:2:2692
Post by Pauline jones: Bessborough Place, SW1V

I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see there children playing, we use to call it the block as it was built in such a way

Message truncated
Johnshort
Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   
IP: 10.9.55.126
2:3:2692
Post by Johnshort: Hurley Road, SE11

There were stables in the road mid way also Danny reading had coal delivery lorry.n

peter hiller
peter hiller   
Added: 13 Sep 2017 11:07 GMT   
IP: 81.141.12.149
2:4:2692
Post by peter hiller: Sancroft Street, SE11

what is the history of tresco house 2 sancroft street ,it looks older than a 1990s site

Robert smitherman
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   
IP: 2.220.194.137
2:5:2692
Post by Robert smitherman: Saunders Street, SE11

I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

LDNnews
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Post by LDNnews: Covent Garden
Good news - it’s about to get even colder according to the Met Office
Bad news for all the warm weather lovers, it is about to get an awful lot colder.

https://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/17378379.london-weather-met-office-forecast-says-it-will-get-even-colder/?ref=rss

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Added: 23 Jan 2019 15:20 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Charing Cross



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Post by LDNnews: Blackfriars
Gonzalo Higuain in London to complete Chelsea transfer but will not face Tottenham in the EFL Cup
January Window LIVE | Stay on top of the latest news and rumours in our transfer blog

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Added: 23 Jan 2019 07:30 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Southwark
Bankside Cycle Club to receive TfL funding
An initiative to provide bicycles and training for young people and adults in the Bankside area is among 30 community cycling projects across the capital to receive funds from Transport for London.

http://feeds.london-se1.co.uk/~r/se1-news/~3/AoAtxfGMGgY/9802

LDNnews
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Added: 22 Jan 2019 13:30 GMT   
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3:10:2692
Post by LDNnews: Covent Garden
Relatives exploiting Blue Badges have been named and shamed by Bromley Council
More people exploiting their relatives’ Blue Badge disabled parking permits have been named and shamed by Bromley Council.

https://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/17375416.blue-badge-disabled-parking-offenders-named-by-bromley-council/?ref=rss

LDNnews
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Added: 22 Jan 2019 13:30 GMT   
IP:
3:11:2692
Post by LDNnews: Charing Cross
Council vows to stand up for residents over Heathrow
Council vows to stand up for residents over Heathrow

https://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/17375715.harrow-council-plans-to-protect-public-over-heathrow/?ref=rss

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Added: 22 Jan 2019 13:20 GMT   
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3:12:2692
Post by LDNnews: Southwark
Arsenal vs Man Utd: FA Cup score prediction, line-ups, team news, odds, live stream, TV, tickets, h2h
Arsenal will look to become the first team to beat Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s Manchester United at the Emirates Stadium on Friday.

https://www.standard.co.uk/sport/football/arsenal-vs-man-utd-fa-cup-score-prediction-lineups-odds-live-stream-tv-tickets-preview-a4045046.html

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Added: 22 Jan 2019 13:20 GMT   
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3:13:2692
Post by LDNnews: Blackfriars
Arsenal fans warned Stan Kroenke should not be trusted: Why owner is still reviled on streets of St Louis
If Stan Kroenke feels unloved by Arsenal fans, such disdain pales into insignificance compared with the feeling on the streets of St Louis.

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Added: 21 Jan 2019 16:20 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Covent Garden



https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/festive-revellers-celebrate-as-34k-of-parking-fines-written-off-by-hackney-council-a4044256.html

LDNnews
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Added: 21 Jan 2019 15:40 GMT   
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Post by LDNnews: Charing Cross
Duchess of Cambridge visiting Forest Hill tomorrow to launch new family support service
The Duchess of Cambridge will be visiting Forest Hill tomorrow to launch a new national helpline to help carers.

https://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/17373207.duchess-of-cambridge-kate-in-lewisham-to-launch-familyline-service/?ref=rss

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Post by LDNnews: Southwark
Baby dies a week after his mother was killed while crossing a road in Penge

The eight-month old son of a young mum killed in a car crash in Penge has died in hospital.


https://www.thisislocallondon.co.uk/news/17373505.baby-son-of-nicole-newman-who-was-killed-in-penge-crash-has-died/?ref=rss

VIEW THE WATERLOO AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
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VIEW THE WATERLOO AREA IN THE 1830s
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VIEW THE WATERLOO AREA IN THE 1860s
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VIEW THE WATERLOO AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Waterloo

London Waterloo station is a central London railway terminus and London Underground complex. The station is one of 18 in Britain owned and operated by Network Rail and is close to the South Bank of the River Thames.

The London and South Western Railway (L&SWR) opened the station on 11 July 1848 as 'Waterloo Bridge Station' (from the nearby crossing over the Thames) when its main line was extended from Nine Elms. The station, designed by William Tite, was raised above marshy ground on a series of arches. The unfulfilled intention was for a through station with services to the City. In 1886, it officially became Waterloo Station, reflecting long-standing common usage, even in some L&SWR timetables.

It is located in the Waterloo district of London, which was itself named after the Battle of Waterloo in which Napoleon was defeated near Brussels.

As the station grew, it became increasingly ramshackle. The original 1848 station became known as the 'Central Station' as other platforms were added. The new platform sets were known by nicknames - the two platforms added for suburban services in 1878 were the 'Cyprus Station', whilst the six built in 1885 for use by trains on the Windsor line became the 'Khartoum Station'. Each of these stations-within-a-station had its own booking office, taxi stand and public entrances from the street, as well as often poorly marked and confusing access to the rest of the station. This complexity and confusion became the butt of jokes by writers and music hall comics for many years in the late 19th century, including Jerome K. Jerome in Three Men in a Boat.

The present buildings were inaugurated in 1922. Part of the station is a Grade II listed heritage building.

With over 91 million passenger entries and exits between April 2010 and March 2011, Waterloo is easily Britain's busiest railway station in terms of passenger usage. The Waterloo complex is one of the busiest passenger terminals in Europe. It has more platforms and a greater floor area than any other station in the UK (though Clapham Junction, just under 4 miles down the line, has the largest number of trains). It is the terminus of a network of railway lines from Surrey, Berkshire, Hampshire, South West England, and the south-western suburbs of London.

Waterloo tube station is, like its namesake, the busiest station on the network and is served by the Bakerloo, Jubilee, Northern and the Waterloo & City lines.

The first underground station at Waterloo was opened on 8 August 1898 by the Waterloo & City Railway (W&CR), a subsidiary of the owners of the main line station, the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR). The W&CR, nicknamed the Drain, achieved in a limited way the L&SWR's original plan of taking its tracks the short distance north-east into the City of London.

On 10 March 1906, the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway (BS&WR, now the Bakerloo line) was opened. On 13 September 1926, the extension of the Hampstead & Highgate line (as the Charing Cross branch of the Northern line was then known) was opened from Embankment to the existing City & South London Railway station Kennington with a new station at Waterloo.

As a subsidiary of the L&SWR and its successor the Southern Railway, the W&CR was not a part of the London Underground system. Following nationalization of the main line railway companies in 1948, it became part of British Railways (later British Rail). Following a period of closure during 1993 when the line was converted to use the four rail electrical system of the London Underground, the ownership of Waterloo & City line was transferred to the Underground on 1 April 1994.

On 24 September 1999, the Jubilee line station was opened as part of the Jubilee Line Extension. The station was temporarily the western terminus of the extension running from Stratford in east London, before the final section to link the extension to the original line was opened between Waterloo and Green Park on 20 November 1999.[9] The Jubilee platforms are at the opposite end of the site from those of the Bakerloo and Northern lines, but the two ends are connected by a 140-metre moving walkway link (one of only two on the Underground - the other gives access to the Waterloo & City line platform at Bank station).

Waterloo station is linked to the South Bank by an elevated walkway. It was once possible to walk directly by elevated walkways and footbridges all the way from the concourse of Waterloo to that of Charing Cross railway station on the north side of the Thames, but the demolition of part of the Waterloo walkway and the reconstruction of the Hungerford Footbridge means that that is no longer possible.

OTHER LOCATIONS NEAR HERE
Aquinas Street · Canterbury Music Hall · Centaur Street · DLD College London · Embankment · Evelina Hospital School · Friars Primary Foundation School · Gray Street · Hercules Road · Jubilee Gardens · King’s College London · Lambeth Palace Road · Lambeth Road · Lambeth Walk · London Aquarium · Lower Marsh · Mitre Road · Necropolis Station · Old Vic · Peabody Square · Pontypool Place · Samford Street · Southbank Centre Square · Southbank · Stamford · Station Approach · Steam Pump Lane · Strand Lane · The Marine Society College of the Sea · The Queen’s Steps · The Queen’s Walk · The Queen’s Walk · The Queen’s Walk · The Tunnel · Ufford Street · Victoria Embankment · Waterloo · Waterloo Air Terminal (1953) · Waterloo Bridge · Webber Row · Whittlesey Street · Windmill Walk · York Road Curve · Young Vic ·
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Central London, south east (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, south east.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Cruchley's New Plan of London (1848) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cruchley's New Plan of London Shewing all the new and intended improvements to the Present Time. - Cruchley's Superior Map of London, with references to upwards of 500 Streets, Squares, Public Places & C. improved to 1848: with a compendium of all Place of Public Amusements also shewing the Railways & Stations.
G. F. Cruchley

Cary's New And Accurate Plan of London and Westminster (1818) FREE DOWNLOAD
Cary's map provides a detailed view of London. With print date of 1 January 1818, Cary's map has 27 panels arranged in 3 rows of 9 panels, each measuring approximately 6 1/2 by 10 5/8 inches. The complete map measures 32 1/8 by 59 1/2 inches. Digitising this map has involved aligning the panels into one contiguous map.
John Cary

John Rocque Map of London (1762) FREE DOWNLOAD
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers central London at a reduced level of detail compared with his 1745-6 map.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1843) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured.
Chapman and Hall, London

Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge (1836) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Insets: A view of the Tower from London Bridge -- A view of London from Copenhagen Fields. Includes views of facades of 25 structures "A comparison of the principal buildings of London."
Chapman and Hall, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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