Gloucester Road, SW7

Road in/near Gloucester Road, existing between 1612 and now

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Road · Gloucester Road · SW7 ·
MAY
31
2013

Gloucester Road is a main street in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.


It runs north-south between Kensington Gardens (at which point it is known as Palace Gate) and the Old Brompton Road at the south end. At its intersection with Cromwell Road is Gloucester Road Underground station, close to which there are several pubs, restaurants, many hotels and St Stephen’s Church (built in 1867 and, notably, the church warden of which was the poet T. S. Eliot).

In 1612 or earlier it was called Hogs Moor or Hogmire Lane. It was a ’lane through marshy ground where hogs are kept’, a name that was still used until about 1850. and it was the site of an ultimately unsuccessful pleasure garden (and for a while a pick-your-own fruit and flower farm) in the late 18th century. At that time most of the vicinity was filled with nurseries and market gardens.

The road is now named after Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh who built a house there - Villa Maria (later Orford Lodge) - in 1805, on part of the pleasure garden’s site. She died there two years later. The politician George Canning bought the property in 1809 and retained it until 1825. The house (latterly called Gloucester Lodge) stood in extensive grounds close to what is now the south-east corner of Gloucester Road’s junction with Cromwell Road.

Much of the surrounding area was built up in the second quarter of the 19th century or soon afterwards.


Main source: Wikipedia
Further citations and sources


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Gloucester Road

Gloucester Road: Where Rumpole of the Bailey hung his hat.

Gloucester Road is a street in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea of London. It runs north-south between Kensington Gardens (at which point it is known as Palace Gate) and the Old Brompton Road at the south end. At its intersection with Cromwell Road is Gloucester Road tube station, close to which there are several pubs, restaurants, many hotels and St. Stephen's Church (built in 1867 and, notably, the church warden of which was the poet T. S. Eliot).

The road is named after Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh who built a house there in 1805. It was earlier called Hog Moore Lane (1612), that is 'lane through marshy ground where hogs are kept', a name that was still used until about 1850.

Gloucester Road is the residence (in the form of 25B Froxbury Court) of the fictional barrister Horace Rumpole of John Mortimer's Rumpole of the Bailey series of short stories.

Gloucester Road underground station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms, opened in 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway as part of the company's extension of the Inner Circle route from Paddington to South Kensington and to Westminster, and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway. A variety of underground and mainline services have operated over the sub-surface tracks. The deep-level platforms have remained largely unaltered. A disused sub-surface platform features periodic art installations as part of Transport for London's Art on the Underground scheme.
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