Westbourne Manor

Large house in/near Westbourne Green, existing until 1866

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Large house · Westbourne Green · W9 · Contributed by The Underground Map
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1830 map of Westbourne Park


The Manor of Westbourne

The monks of Westminster claimed to have been granted a small farm at Paddington in 959 and to have held 2 hides there in 1042. Although the early charters were spurious, Paddington, Knightsbridge, and Westbourne were probably part of the abbey's ancient endowment and among the 13½ hides at Westminster attributed to it in Domesday Book.

The estate known in the 19th century as the manor of Westbourne formed part of the abbey's lands in the parish. Together with all the lands in Paddington formerly devoted to the Lady chapel, they were leased for 99 years in 1542 to Sir Edward North. Thereafter the estate consisted mainly of the three fields in Westbourne, 6 acres further south in the common fields near the Uxbridge Road, and five closes west of Arnold's field, formerly of St. Mary's chapel and known by 1669 as Ashgroves. They were leased in 1631 to George Stonhouse, who in 1632 succeeded as Sir George Stonhouse, Baronet of Radley. Sir George settled the lease on his third son James, for whom and for whose heirs it was repeatedly renewed. In 1725 the lessee was James's son Richard Stonhouse and in 1742 Richard's son James, physician, who later inherited the baronetcy, and in 1796 the Revd. Timothy Stonhouse Vigor and George Vansittart were trustees for Sir James Stonhouse's son Sir Thomas. Their interest was conveyed in 1805 to the engineer John Braithwaite (d. 1818), who obtained a new lease in 1811.

The Stonhouses probably always divided and subleased their estate: Ashgroves and William's field were subleased in 1634 and Ashgrove, Ash field, and Knight's field were part of the large Westbourne Green farm in 1776. No house was recorded in leases by Westminster until the early 19th century, when Westbourne Manor House stood north-east of Harrow Road and north of the Grand Junction canal, with William's field to the north-east. John Braithwaite's residence in 1814, with two storeys and a steeply pitched roof, was perhaps of c. 1700; the main front was of five bays, with a single-storeyed extension of three bays, beyond which it was proposed to build new stables and offices. Extensive improvements were reported in 1815, including the inclosure and planting of ground between the house and Harrow Road and probably a tree-lined walk which ran from the rear alongside William's field to the Westbourne. Braithwaite died at Westbourne Manor House, which his son John (1797-1870), also a noted engineer, retained until c. 1840. Later tenants were William Charles Carbonell, a wine merchant, who held it with 14 acres in 1846, and from 1854 John, afterwards Sir John, Humphreys. The house probably survived in 1866 but had been replaced by the western end of Sutherland Avenue in 1867.

Source: 'Paddington: Manors and Other Estates', A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 9: Hampstead, Paddington (1989), pp. 226-233.

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My Father Richard Knappe was born at 133 Elgin Crescent in 1923. My Grandfather being a refugee from the Italian border town of Gorizia.

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Mary Harris
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Post by Mary Harris: 31 Princedale Road, W11

John and I were married in 1960 and we bought, or rather acquired a mortgage on 31 Princedale Road in 1961 for £5,760 plus another two thousand for updating plumbing and wiring, and installing central heating, a condition of our mortgage. It was the top of what we could afford.

We chose the neighbourhood by putting a compass point on John’s office in the City and drawing a reasonable travelling circle round it because we didn’t want him to commute. I had recently returned from university in Nigeria, where I was the only white undergraduate and where I had read a lot of African history in addition to the subject I was studying, and John was still recovering from being a prisoner-of-war of the Japanese in the Far East in WW2. This is why we rejected advice from all sorts of people not to move into an area where there had so recently bee

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Maria Russ
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Post by Maria Russ: Middle Row Bus Garage

My mum worked as a Clippie out from Middle Row Bus Garage and was conductress to George Marsh Driver. They travel the City and out to Ruislip and Acton duiring the 1950’s and 1960’s. We moved to Langley and she joined Windsor Bus Garage and was on the Greenline buses after that. It was a real family of workers from Middle Row and it formed a part of my early years in London. I now live in New Zealand, but have happy memories of the early years of London Transport and Middle Row Garage.
Still have mum’s bus badge.

Happy times they were.

Julia elsdon
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Post by Julia elsdon: Shirland Mews, W9

I didn’t come from Shirland Mews, but stayed there when my father was visiting friends, sometime in the mid to late forties. As I was only a very young child I don’t remember too much. I seem to think there were the old stables or garages with the living accommodation above. My Mother came from Malvern Road which I think was near Shirland Mews. I remember a little old shop which had a "milk cow outside". So I was told, it was attached to the front of the shop and you put some money in and the milk would be dispensed into your container. Not too sure if it was still in use then. Just wonder if anyone else remembers it.yz5

David Jones-Parry
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Post by David Jones-Parry: Tavistock Crescent, W11

I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood ,from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

David Jones-Parry
David Jones-Parry   
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Post by David Jones-Parry: Mcgregor Road, W11

I lived at 25 Mc Gregor Rd from 1938 my birth until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957.Our house sided onto Ridgeways Laundry All Saints Rd. I had a happy boyhood living there

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VIEW THE WESTBOURNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE WESTBOURNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
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VIEW THE WESTBOURNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
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VIEW THE WESTBOURNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
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VIEW THE WESTBOURNE GREEN AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Westbourne Green

The story of the building of a suburb.

Westbourne Green had only a few houses by 1745, mostly south of the point where Harrow Road had a junction with Westbourne Green Lane (also known as Black Lion Lane) running northward from the Uxbridge Road. A footpath later called Bishop’s Walk (eventually Bishop’s Bridge Road) provided a short cut to Paddington Green. The Red Lion, where Harrow Road bridged the Westbourne, and another inn were recorded in 1730. The second inn was probably one called the Jolly Gardeners in 1760 and the Three Jolly Gardeners in 1770, near the Harrow Road junction, where it probably made way for the Spotted Dog.

The early 19th-century village contained five notable residences: Westbourne Place, west of Black Lion Lane at its junction with Harrow Road, and, from south to north on the east side of Harrow Road, Desborough Lodge, Westbourne Farm, Bridge House, and Westbourne Manor House. Bridge House was built c. 1805 by the architect John White, owner of Westbourne Farm.

Westbourne Green had a very refined air in 1795 and was still considered a beautiful rural place in 1820. The Grand Junction canal, passing north of the village between the grounds of Westbourne Farm and Bridge House, was a scenic enhancement, later used to attract expensive building to the area. Although housing was spreading along Black Lion Lane, it had not reached Westbourne Green by 1828, when a house later called Elm Lodge stood north-west of Westbourne Manor House. There was also a short row, later called Belsize Villas, alone to the west on the south side of Harrow Road at Orme’s Green, by 1830. The main addition was at the southern end of the village, opposite Bishop’s Walk, where Pickering Terrace (later part of Porchester Road), backed by a double row called Pickering Place, formed a compact block of cottages amid the fields.

The cutting of the G.W.R. line across the middle of Westbourne Green was begun in 1836, necessitating a slight northward realignment of Harrow Road east of its junction with Black Lion Lane, where a turnpike gate was moved. Since the railway obstructed the Paddington green end of Bishop’s Walk, the footpath was replaced by Bishop’s Road, soon extended westward as Westbourne Grove. (Although no large houses were demolished, the railway passed close to Westbourne Park, from which Lord Hill moved out. By 1840 several new roads were projected, including Westbourne Grove. Houses had been built there by 1842, when the Lock hospital, giving its name to the Lock bridge where Harrow Road crossed the canal, stood opposite Westbourne Manor House to the north. The centre of the area, however, along Harrow Road and on either side of the railway, remained empty.

Housing spread in the 1840s, mainly south of the railway. The eastern end of Bishop’s Road was built up and at first called Westbourne Place, where the publisher George Smith was visited by Charlotte Bronte in 1848 and 1849. Further north, residential growth was curtailed by the G.W.R. depots and sidings. Immediately to the west, where the Paddington Estate straddled the Westbourne, roads were laid out, with bridges over the railway to link them with Harrow Road. Holy Trinity church was finished in 1846 and Orsett Terrace, Gloucester Crescent (later the northernmost part of Gloucester Terrace), and Porchester Square had been planned by 1851. No. 37 Gloucester Gardens, Bishop’s Road, was the London home of the architect Decimus Burton by 1855. Most of the area between Bishop’s Road and the railway had been filled by 1855, except the site of Penny’s House, which was to be taken in 1871 for Royal Oak station.

A builder, William Scantlebury, erected much of the neighbourhood around Orsett Terrace and Gloucester Crescent, where he took leases in 1849-50 and 1852 respectively. John Scantlebury of Porchester Terrace North built part of Porchester Square, where many plots were subleased by George Wyatt between 1853 and 1855.

Farther west building had already begun for William Kinnaird Jenkins, a lawyer who also acquired part of the Ladbroke estate from W. H. Jenkins and was responsible for laying out Kensal New Town. Houses were planned for W. K. Jenkins along both sides of Westbourne Grove, west of Pickering Place, in 1838 and along an extension of Westbourne Grove in 1840. They were detached villas, like those to be built for him in Newton Road in 1846, when he also had plans for Hereford Road. More land in Hereford Road was leased out by the Paddington Estate between 1853 and 1855, much of it for terraces by J. P. Waterson, a Bayswater builder, who assigned his interest in several sites to John Wicking Phillips. To the north, Westbourne Park and its grounds made way for large semidetached villas in Westbourne Park Road and, beside the railway, Westbourne Park Villas. No. 16 Westbourne Park Villas from 1863 to 1867 was the intermittent home of Thomas Hardy, who also lived briefly at no. 4 Celbridge Place (later Porchester Road) and in Newton Road. Fields survived between Westbourne Park Road and Newton Road in 1851 but had been covered with modest terraces by 1855, when St. Stephen’s church was being built.

Between the railway and the canal, the pace of building and the social pattern were more varied. The eastern part, where Delamere Terrace lined the canal and Warwick Crescent overlooked the pool, was begun as an extension of Little Venice. Leases for 13 houses in Westbourne Terrace Road were taken in 1847 by G. L. Taylor, architect of some of the grandest houses in Tyburnia and Maida Vale, who also built in Blomfield Terrace, along Harrow Road. Other lessees included William Buddle, for 19 houses in Blomfield Street (later Villas) and Delamere Terrace in 1851 and 12 in Warwick Crescent, where plots were assigned to him by G. L. Taylor in 1852. Early residents included Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sister Arabel Barrett in Delamere Terrace; in order to be near her Robert Browning moved from lodgings at no. 1 Chichester Road and made his English home at no. 19 Warwick Crescent from 1862 until 1887.

Farther west, beyond Ranelagh (from 1938 Lord Hill’s) Road, building was slightly delayed by the survival until after 1855 of Desborough Lodge and Westbourne Farm. Brindley Street, Alfred Road, and their neighbours already formed densely packed terraces west of the Lock Bridge and Harrow Road. By 1861 Desborough Lodge and Westbourne Farm had made way for Clarendon, Woodchester and Cirencester Streets, whose small houses resembled those around Brindley Street rather than the stately terraces to the east.

North of the canal, the workhouse was built next to the Lock in 1846-7. Building, although not the imposing crescent planned in 1847, stretched from there along the south side of Harrow Road to Woodfield Road at Orme’s Green by 1855.

The 1860s saw housing, which had ended in 1855 at St. Stephen’s Church and Hereford Road, spread to the Kensington boundary.

North of the canal the site of Westbourne Manor House was built over from 1867 and Amberley Road with its timber wharves was built along the canal bank. The whole of Westbourne Green thus came to be built up.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Abbey Court Hotel:   The Abbey Court is a hotel located at 20 Pembridge Gardens in Notting Hill.
Ark Atwood Primary Academy:   Free schools (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Bayswater:   Bayswater is one of London's most cosmopolitan areas - also one of London's biggest concentration of hotels.
Bayswater Rivulet:   The Bayswater Rivulet was the original name for the Westbourne River
Bridge House:   Canal side house in Westbourne Park
College Park School:   Community special school which accepts students between the ages of 4 and 19.
Corner of Kilburn Park Road and Shirland Road:   Kilburn Park Road and Shirland Road meet at a junction in the north of Maida Vale.
Desborough Lodge:   Desborough Lodge was a house which was one of five grand houses in the village of Westbourne Green.
Duke of Cornwall (The Ledbury):   The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Edward Wilson Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Essendine Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 11.
Granville Plus Nursery School:   Local authority nursery school (Nursery) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 5.
Hallfield Primary School:   Community school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 11.
Horbury Chapel (Kensington Temple):   In September 1849, the Horbury Chapel, Notting Hill was officially opened.
Kensington Park School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 14 and 19. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Kilburn Aqueduct:   Some way from the area now called Kilburn, the Kilburn Aqueduct of the Grand Union Canal spanned the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge:   Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge Farm:   Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn Park:   Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm:   Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Kilburn Wells:   Kilburn Wells. a medicinal spring, existed between 1714 and the 1860s.
Maida Hill:   Maida Hill's name derives from the Hero of Maida inn which used to be on Edgware Road near the Regent's Canal.
Maida Vale Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Mercury Theatre:   The Mercury Theatre was situated at 2a Ladbroke Road, next to the Kensington Temple.
Naima Jewish Preparatory School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 2 and 11. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Notting Hill Gate:   Notting Hill Gate tube station is a London Underground station on the Central Line.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days:   Notting Hill in Bygone Days by Florence Gladstone, was originally published in 1924 by T. Fisher Unwin.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days: Kensington Gravel Pits and Northlands:   Chapter 2 of the book "Notting Hill in Bygone Days" by Florence Gladstone (1924)
Orme's Green:   Ormes Green was the former name for this part of Westbourne Park.
Our Lady of Dolours RC Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Paddington Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Pembridge Hall School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 4 and 11. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Prince Albert:   The Prince Albert has been a Notting Hill feature since the 1840s.
Queen's Cinema:   This cinema was situated at the top of Queensway, on the corner of Bishop's Bridge Road.
Queensway:   Queensway (formerly Queen's Road) is a bustling cosmopolitan street in the Bayswater district of west London, containing many restaurants and stores.
Queensway Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Red Lion:   The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
Red Lion Bridge:   Harrow Road once spanned the River Westbourne at this point.
River Westbourne:   The Westbourne is one of the lost rivers of London.
Royal Oak:   Royal Oak is a station on the Hammersmith and City Line, between Westbourne Park and Paddington stations, and is the least used station on the Hammersmith and City line.
Southbank International School Kensington:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Spotted Dog:   The Spotted Dog public house was one of the earliest buildings in Westbourne Green.
St Augustine’s CofE High School:   Voluntary aided school (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
St Augustine’s Church of England High School:   St Augustine’s Church of England High School is a Voluntary Aided Church of England comprehensive school in the West London borough of Westminster, Kilburn.
St Augustine’s, Kilburn:   St Augustine’s was founded by Richard Carr Kirkpatrick in the Anglo-Catholic tradition in 1870 and listed as a Grade I building by Historic England.
St George’s Catholic School:   Academy converter (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
St Mary Magdalene CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Mary’s Harrow Road:   St Mary’s Harrow Road was built as the infirmary for the Paddington Workhouse.
St Mary’s RC Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Peter’s CofE School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 5 and 11.
St Peter’s Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 4 and 11.
St Saviour’s CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Stephen’s CofE Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St. Mary of the Angels Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
The Kilburn Park School Foundation:   Foundation school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 7 and 11.
The School of the Islamic Republic of Iran:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 6 and 16. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
The Windsor Castle:   The Windsor Castle dates from the 1820s but its main incarnation was as a classic Victorian public house, seminal in 1970s musical history.
Westbourne Farm:   An old farm with a theatrical connection.
Westbourne Green:   The story of the building of a suburb.
Westbourne Green:   
Westbourne House:   Two hundred years ago, the biggest house hereabouts...
Westminster Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Wetherby Preparatory School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 8 and 13.


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Westbourne Lodge:   Westbourne Lodge appeared in one of the earliest photographs in London.
Whiteley's:   Whiteley’s, pictured here in the 1920s, was designated a Grade II Listed Building in 1970.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Abinger Mews, W9 · Admiral Walk, W9 · Aldsworth Close, W9 · Alexander Mews, W2 · Alexander Street, W2 · Alfred Road, W2 · Alpha Place, NW6 · Amberley Road, W9 · Andover Place, NW6 · Andover Place, W9 · Artesian Road, W2 · Ashworth Road, W9 · Bark Place, W2 · Barnard Lodge, W9 · Barnwood Close, W9 · Biddulph Mansions, W9 · Biddulph Road, W9 · Bolton Road, NW8 · Bourne Terrace, W2 · Bridstow Place, W2 · Bristol Gardens, W9 · Brondesbury Road, NW6 · Brondesbury Villas, NW6 · Bulmer Mews, W11 · Burdett Mews, W2 · Burlington Close, W9 · Cambridge Avenue, NW6 · Cambridge Court, NW6 · Cambridge Gardens, NW6 · Cambridge Road, NW6 · Campden Hill Towers, W11 · Canterbury Road, NW6 · Canterbury Terrace, NW6 · Canterbury Works, NW6 · Caradoc Close, W2 · Carlton Vale, NW6 · Carlton Vale, W9 · Caroline Place Mews, W2 · Caroline Place, W2 · Castellain Mansions, W9 · Castellain Road, W9 · Cathedral Walk, NW6 · Celbridge Mews, W2 · Cervantes Court, W2 · Charfield Court, W9 · Chepstow Corner, W2 · Chepstow Crescent, W11 · Chepstow Place, W2 · Chepstow Road, W2 · Chepstow Villas, W11 · Chichester Road, NW6 · Chichester Road, W2 · Chippenham Gardens, NW6 · Chippenham Mews, W9 · Chippenham Road, W9 · Cirencester Street, W2 · Clanricarde Gardens, W2 · Clearwell Drive, W9 · Consort House, W2 · Courtnell Street, W2 · Coventry Close, NW6 · Croxley Road, W9 · Dawson Place, W2 · Delamere Terrace, W2 · Delaware Road, W9 · Desborough Close, W2 · Dibdin House, W9 · Downfield Close, W9 · Dudley Street, W2 · East Westbourne Grove, W2 · Edbrooke Road, W9 · Elgin Avenue, W9 · Elgin Mansions, W9 · Elmfield Way, W9 · Elnathan Mews, W9 · Elsie Lane Court, W2 · Essendine Mansions, W9 · Essendine Road, W9 · Evesham House, W2 · Fosbury Mews, W2 · Foscote Mews, W9 · Garway Road, W2 · Gaydon House, W2 · Godson Yard, NW6 · Goldney Road, W9 · Gorefield Place, NW6 · Grantully Road, W9 · Granville Road, NW6 · Greville Mews, NW6 · Greville Place, NW6 · Greville Place, W9 · Greville Road, NW6 · Grittleton Road, W9 · Hansel Road, NW6 · Harrow Road, W9 · Hatherley Grove, W2 · Helmsdale House, NW6 · Hereford Road, W2 · Hermes Close, W9 · Hillside Close, NW6 · Hillside Close, W9 · Horbury Crescent, W11 · Hunter Lodge, W9 · Ilchester Gardens, W2 · Inverness Mews, E16 · Inverness Mews, W2 · Inverness Place, W2 · Inverness Terrace, W2 · Kensington Gardens Square, W2 · Kilburn Park Road, NW6 · Kilburn Park Road, W9 · Kilburn Priory, NW6 · Kilburn Square, NW6 · Kildare Terrace, W2 · Lanhill Road, W9 · Lauderdale Mansions South, W9 · Lauderdale Parade, W9 · Lauderdale Road, W9 · Ledbury Mews North, W11 · Ledbury Mews West, W11 · Ledbury Road, W11 · Ledbury Road, W2 · Leinster Square, W2 · Leith Mansions, W9 · Linden Gardens, W2 · Linden Mews, W2 · Lister Lodge, W9 · Lord Hills Road, W2 · Malvern Mews, NW6 · Malvern Mews, W9 · Malvern Road, NW6 · Manor Mews, NW6 · Maple Mews, NW6 · Marylands Road, W9 · Marylebone Flyover, W2 · Masefield House, NW6 · Monmouth Road, W2 · Moorhouse Road, W2 · Morshead Road, W9 · Moscow Place, W2 · Moscow Road, W2 · Needham Road, W11 · Nelson Close, NW6 · Neville Close, NW6 · Neville Road, NW6 · Newton Road, W2 · Northumberland Place, W2 · Northumberland Place, W2 · Notting Hill Gate, W2 · Oakington Road, W9 · Olympia Mews, W2 · Orme Court, W2 · Orme Lane, W2 · Orme Square, W2 · Ossington Street, W2 · Oxford Road, NW6 · Paddington Green, W2 · Palace Court, W2 · Peel Precinct, NW6 · Pembridge Crescent, W11 · Pembridge Gardens, W2 · Pembridge Mews, W11 · Pembridge Place, W11 · Pembridge Place, W2 · Pembridge Road, W11 · Pembridge Road, W2 · Pembridge Square, W2 · Pembridge Villas, W11 · Pembroke House, W2 · Pentland Road, NW6 · Pickering Mews, W2 · Pindock Mews, W9 · Plaza Parade, NW6 · Poplar Place, W2 · Porchester Gardens Mews, W2 · Porchester Gardens, W2 · Porchester Road, W2 · Porchester Square, W2 · Porchester Terrace North, W2 · Prince’s Square, W2 · Princes Mews, W2 · Princes Square, W2 · Princess Court, W2 · Princess Road, NW6 · Princethorpe House, W2 · Queens Court, W2 · Queens Mews, W2 · Queensborough Studios, W2 · Queensway, W2 · Randolph Gardens, NW6 · Ranelagh Bridge, W2 · Redan House, W2 · Redan Place, W2 · Rede Place, W2 · Regents Plaza, NW6 · Rosehart Mews, W11 · Rowington Close, W2 · Rudolph Road, NW6 · Saint Petersburgh Place, W2 · Saint Stephen’s Gardens, W2 · Salem Road, W2 · Saltram Crescent, W9 · Saltram Cresent, W9 · Senior Street, W2 · Sevington Street, W9 · Shirland Mews, W9 · Shirland Road, W9 · Shrewsbury Road, W2 · Springfield Lane, NW6 · St John’s Mews, W11 · St Petersburgh Mews, W2 · St Petersburgh Place, W2 · St Stephens Gardens, W2 · St Stephens Mews, W2 · St Stephen’s Gardens, W2 · Stafford Close, NW6 · Stafford Road, NW6 · Stuart Road, NW6 · Surrendale Place, W9 · Sutherland Avenue, W9 · Sutherland Place, W2 · Sutherland Place, W2 · Talbot Road, W2 · The Whiteleys Centre, W2 · Thorngate Road, W9 · Torquay Street, W2 · Torridon House, NW6 · Warlock Road, W9 · Warwick Court, W9 · Wellington Close, W11 · Wells Court, NW6 · Westbourne Gardens, W2 · Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 · Westbourne Grove Terrace, W2 · Westbourne Grove, W11 · Westbourne Grove, W2 · Westbourne Park Road, W11 · Westbourne Park Road, W2 · Westbourne Park Villas, W2 · Westway, W2 · Whiteleys Centre, W2 · Widley Road, W9 · Windsor Court, W2 · Windsor Gardens, W9 · Woodchester Square, W2 · Woodfield Crescent, W9 · Woodfield Road, W9 · Wymering Mansions, W9 · Wymering Road, W9 ·
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Maps


Inner West London (1932) FREE DOWNLOAD
1930s map covering East Acton, Holland Park, Kensington, Notting Hill, Olympia, Shepherds Bush and Westbourne Park,
George Philip & Son, Ltd./London Geographical Society, 1932

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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