Young Street, W8

Road in/near Kensington, existing between 1685 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
18.207.254.88 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Fullscreen map
Road · Kensington · W8 ·
MAY
11
2018

Young Street, named after the developer of Kensington Square, was in use as a road by 1685.



Running perpendicular to the square, it was the only thoroughfare leading into it from Kensington High Street until the opening of what is now Derry Street in the mid-1730s.

As with development at Kensington Square, the street was parcelled up into lots and let or sold to developers and builders. Young retained the freehold of the area on the west side, immediately north of no.16, and probably erected two houses there by 1695. Unlike Kensington Square this area was much more socially diverse in character, with occupants connected to the court of William III sharing the length of the street with resident tradesmen and shopkeepers. There were also several Huguenots attracted to residences here.

Little remains from this time. Going by the photographs taken in the 1860s, the street was largely unaltered. Bomb damage from the Second World War, however, and before that the construction of Kensington Square Mansions on the west side of Young Street in 1885, and the building of a Post Office at nos. 15 and 17 between the 1860s and 1890s, radically changed the appearance of Young Street.

South of the Post Office John Barker and Company rebuilt nos. 19 and 21 in 1890 with two shops separated by an arched entrance that led to stabling and workshops at the rear while less than a century later a multi-storey car park went up in 1968 on the sites of nos. 19-27.

Houses of note on what must have been a busy thoroughfare of horse-drawn carriages are no. 9, rebuilt in 1905 in Arts and Crafts style for a solicitor who occupied premises above a ground floor shop.


Main source: Planning documents
Further citations and sources


xxx



 

Kensington

Kensington is a district of West London, England within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, located west of Charing Cross.

The focus of the area is Kensington High Street, a busy commercial centre with many shops, typically upmarket. The street was declared London's second best shopping street in February 2005 thanks to its range and number of shops.

The edges of Kensington are not well-defined; in particular, the southern part of Kensington blurs into Chelsea, which has a similar architectural style. To the west, a transition is made across the West London railway line and Earl's Court Road further south into other districts, whilst to the north, the only obvious dividing line is Holland Park Avenue, to the north of which is the similar district of Notting Hill.

Kensington is, in general, an extremely affluent area, a trait that it now shares with its neighbour to the south, Chelsea. The area has some of London's most expensive streets and garden squares.

Kensington is also very densely populated; it forms part of the most densely populated local government district (the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea) in the United Kingdom. This high density is not formed from high-rise buildings; instead, it has come about through the subdivision of large mid-rise Victorian and Georgian terraced houses (generally of some four to six floors) into flats.
Print-friendly version of this page