Harvist Road, NW10

Road in/near Queen's Park

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MAPPING YEAR:1750180018301860190019302018Fullscreen map
Road · Queen's Park · NW10 ·
JANUARY
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2000


Harvist Road is a street in Willesden.



ADD A STORY TO HARVIST ROAD
VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE QUEEN'S PARK AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Queen's Park

Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen's Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen's Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen's Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen's Park 'proper' formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen's Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen's Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett's wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen's Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queens Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen's Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway (LNWR) on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen's Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen's Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR. As of December 2013, no mainline services calling at the station and the Watford service has been transferred to London Overground.


LOCATIONS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
1879 Royal Agricultural Society Show:   Washout summers are not only a modern phenomenon
1950 to 1963 at 3 woodnook road, sw16:   house with gas mantles, kitchen range, bread and milk delivered by horse drawn vans.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed):   The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Aldershot Manor Park:   
Ark Brunel Primary Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Ark Franklin Primary Academy:   Academy sponsor led (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Bales College:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 20. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Bassett House School:   Bassett House School is a mixed independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Black Park Country Park:   
Blackheath:   
Boxhill:   
Bricket Wood Sports and Country Club:   
Brondesbury College:   Brondesbury College for Boys is a selective independent school for boys.
Brondesbury College London:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Selective (grammar).
Bulstrode Park:   
Canterbury Park:   
Capel Manor Environmental Centre for Schools:   
Carmelite Monastery of The Most Holy Trinity:   Convent in North Kensington
Castle Park:   
Chamberlayne Farm:   Chamberlain (Wood) Farm developed out of the manor of Chambers, named after Richard de Camera, an early 13th century cleric.
Cherry Tree Park:   
Chipperfield Common:   
Clandon Park:   
Clarence Park:   
Clayton Arms:   A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Cock Marsh:   
Color Printing Works:   Color (sic) Printing Works featured on the 1900 map of North Kensington.
Crown Court Brookman Park:   
Custom:   
Deer Park:   
Dissenters’ Chapel:   The Dissenters’ Chapel is a redundant chapel in Kensal Green Cemetery, recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II* listed building.
Epping Forest Public Open Space:   
Eton Dorney:   
Gas Light and Coke Company:   The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Grays Beach Riverside Park:   
Guards Club Park:   
Ingress Park:   
Jarman Park:   
Kensal House:   There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Kensal Rise:   Former location of the National Athletic Grounds
Kensington Memorial Park:   
La Petite Ecole Francaise:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
Lads of the Village:   One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Lee Valley Regional Park Authority:   
Lee Valley White Water Centre:   
Lily Hill Park:   
Lower Green:   
Lower Park:   
M25 Junction 30:   Junction 30 (J30) of the M25 motorway is the junction to the north of the Dartford River Crossing.
Malorees Junior School:   Foundation school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 7 and 11.
Manor School:   Academy special converter which accepts students between the ages of 4 and 11.
Marylebone Boys’ School:   Free schools (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 18. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Mertsham:   Merstham is a largely residential dispersed village in four sections in the borough of Reigate and Banstead, and lying near to the M23 and M25 motorways.
Middle Row Bus Garage:   Middle Row Bus Garage was situated on the corner of Conlan Street and Middle Row, W10.
Middle Row School:   Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Moneyhole Lane Park:   
North Kensington:   North Kensington lies either side of Ladbroke Grove, W10.
North West London Jewish Day School:   Academy converter (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Northfleet Urban Country Park:   
Northlands Park:   
Notting Hill Barn Farm:   Notting Barns Farm was one of two farms in the North Kensington area.
Notting Hill in Bygone Days: St. Charles’s Ward:   Chapter 10 of the book "Notting Hill in Bygone Days" by Florence Gladstone (1924)
Odney Club:   
Preston Recreation Ground:   
Princess Louise Hospital:   The Princess Louise Hospital for Children was opened by King George V and Queen Mary in 1928. It had 42 beds, an Out-Patients Department and Dispensary for Sick Women.
Queen Victoria/Narrow Boat:   The 'Vic' was the first building on the right when crossing the canal going north along Ladbroke Grove.
Queen's Park:   Queen's Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.
Queens Park Community School:   Queens Park Community School (commonly abbreviated to QPCS) is a secondary school and sixth form with academy status.
Queens Park Community School:   Academy converter (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 19. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
Queens Park Estate:   The part of Queen's Park which is in the W10 postcode and City of Westminster, is known as the Queens Park Estate.
Queen’s Park:   
Queen’s Park Library:   Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
River Gardens:   
Runnymede:   
Saint John the Evangelist:   Saint John’s Church stands on the busy crossroads of Harrow Road, Kilburn Lane and Ladbroke Grove and on the boundaries of the London Boroughs of Brent, Kensington and the City of Westminster, in which it stands.
Saint Mary’s Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
Shrub End Playing Field:   
Silwood Park:   
Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School:   Sion Manning Roman Catholic Girls’ School is in St Charles Square.
Sion-Manning Catholic Girls’ School:   Voluntary aided school (Secondary) which accepts students between the ages of 11 and 16. Admissions policy: Comprehensive (secondary).
St Albans Centurians Rugby League Club:   
St Charles Catholic Primary School:   Voluntary aided school (Primary) which accepts students between the ages of 3 and 11.
St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College:   St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College is a Roman Catholic sixth form college.
St Charles Catholic Sixth Form College:   Further education (16 plus) which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 99.
St Charles Hospital:   The St Marylebone workhouse infirmary was opened in 1881 on Rackham Street, North Kensington and received a congratulatory letter from Florence Nightingale.
St Martins Mission:   Saint Martin's Mission was originally known as Rackham Hall as it was situated on Rackham Street.
St Quintin’s Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Stoke Park:   
Tesco Sports Ground:   
The Brocas:   
The Eagle:   The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road.
The Flora:   The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters:   A lost pub of London W10
The Home Park:   
The Lloyd Williamson School:   Other independent school which accepts students between the ages of 1 and 16. Admissions policy: Non-selective.
The Plough:   From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Prince of Wales (Chilled Eskimo):   A pub in Kensal Town
The Rough Park:   
The Royal Pavillion:   
The Rye:   
The Underground Map:   The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.
The Whites:   
Theobold Park:   
Three Trees Children’s Centre:   This is a children’s centre.
Tidemills:   
Titness Park:   
Town Mead:   
Upper Park:   
Weald Country Park:   
West End Sports Ground:   
Western Arms:   The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
Wombwell Park:   


PHOTOS OF THE AREA
Corner of Rackham Street, Ladbroke Grove (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Exmoor Street (1950):   Photographed just after the Second World War, looking north along Exmoor Street.
Kensal Rise (1907):   Motor buses at Kensal Rise station.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900):   This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1950):   Ladbroke Grove on the corner of St Charles Sqaure taken outside the Eagle public house, looking north, just prior to the outbreak of the Second World War.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge:   Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Rackham Street, eastern end (1950):   The bombing of the Second World War meant that some whole streets were wiped off the future map. Rackham Street, in London W10, was one of them.
Rackham Street, western end (1950):   A bombed-out Rackham Street, looking down from the junction with Exmoor Street.
Rural Chamberlayne Road (1900s):   Until after the first world war, the area north of Kensal Rise was still fields.
St Charles Square after bombing (1950):   A corner of St Charles Square looking north, just after the Second World War
St Charles Square ready for redevelopment (1951):   Photographed in 1951, the corner of St Charles Square and Ladbroke Grove looking northwest just after the Second World War.
St Charles’ Square Training College (1908):   St Charles’ Square Training College/Carmelite Convent.
St Quintin Park Cricket Ground (1890s):   Before the turn of the 20th century, west of present day North Kensington lay fields - the future Barlby Road was the site of the St Quintin Park Cricket Ground.
The Victoria (1920s):   The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it ’conveniently burned down’.
Western Dwellings from below (1960s):   This photo was taken from the bottom of Southern Row steps.
William Miller's Yard:   William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.


NEARBY STREETS AND BUILDINGS ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP
Adela Street, W10 · Admiral Mews, W10 · Allington Road, NW6 · Allington Road, W10 · Alverstone Road, NW2 · Archway Close, W10 · Ashburnham Road, NW10 · Aylestone Avenue, NW6 · Banister Road, W10 · Barlby Gardens, W10 · Barlby Road, W10 · Bassett Road, W10 · Bayford Road, NW10 · Bembridge Close, NW6 · Blake Close, W10 · Bolton Gardens, NW10 · Bonchurch Road, W10 · Branstone Street, W10 · Bridge House, NW10 · Brondesbury Park, NW6 · Bruce Close, W10 · Brunel Mews, W10 · Buller Road, NW10 · Bunny Lane, TW13 · Burrows Road, NW10 · Canal Close, W10 · Canal Way, W10 · Carlisle Road, NW6 · Cavendish Place, W1 · Chamberlayne Road, NW10 · Chesterton Road, W10 · Chevening Road, NW6 · Christchurch Avenue, NW2 · Christchurch Avenue, NW6 · Christchurch Court, NW6 · Chudleigh Road, NW6 · Claremont Road, W10 · Claremont Road, W9 · Clement Close, NW6 · Clifford Gardens, NW10 · Compton Road, NW10 · Conlan Street, W10 · Coverdale Road, NW6 · Crediton Road, NW10 · Creighton Road, NW6 · Dalgarno Way, W10 · Deerhurst Road, NW6 · Droop Street, W10 · Dudley Road, NW6 · Dundonald Road, NW10 · Dunmore Road, NW6 · East Row, W10 · Esher Common NT, KT22 · Exmoor Street, W10 · Faraday Road, W10 · Fifth Avenue, W10 · Forest Close, NW6 · Galton Street, W10 · Halstow Road, NW10 · Hanover Road, NW10 · Hanover West, NW10 · Harrow Road, W10 · Harvist Road, NW10 · Harvist Road, NW6 · Hawthorn Walk, W10 · Hewer Street, W10 · Hill Farm Road, W10 · Honeyman Close, NW2 · Honeyman Close, NW6 · Hopefield Avenue, NW6 · Horton Road, SL3 · Humber Drive, W10 · Huxley Street, W10 · Ilbert Street, W10 · Kelfield Gardens, W10 · Kelfield Mews, W10 · Kempe Road, NW10 · Kempe Road, NW6 · Kensal House, W10 · Keslake Mansions, NW10 · Keslake Road, NW6 · Keslake Road, NW6 · Kilburn Lane, W10 · Kings Parade, NW10 · Kingsbridge Road, W10 · Kingswood Avenue, NW6 · Ladbroke Grove, W10 · Langler Road, NW10 · Lavie Mews, W10 · Leigh Gardens, NW10 · Liddell Gardens, NW10 · Linden Avenue, NW10 · Lionel Mews, W10 · Manchester Drive, W10 · Manor House Drive, NW6 · Mapesbury Road, NW6 · Maple Walk, W10 · Marlow Court, NW6 · Matthew Close, W10 · Maxilla Walk, W10 · Methwold Road, W10 · Middle Row, W10 · Millwood Street, W10 · Milman Road, NW6 · Milverton Road, NW6 · Montrose Avenue, NW6 · Mortimer Road, NW10 · Mount Pleasant Road, NW10 · Mount Pleasant Road, NW2 · Mount Pleasant Road, NW6 · Norburn Street, W10 · Nutbourne Street, W10 · Oakworth Road, W10 · Okehampton Road, NW10 · Okehampton Road, NW6 · Oliphant Street, W10 · Pangbourne Avenue, W10 · Peach Road, W10 · Pember Road, NW10 · Peploe Road, NW6 · Porlock Street, W10 · Post Office Way, SW95 · Purves Road, NW10 · Rackham Street, W10 · Radnor Road, NW6 · Rainham Road, NW10 · Raymede Street, W10 · Regent Street, NW10 · Ronan Walk, W10 · Rootes Drive, W10 · Saint Charles Place, W10 · Saint Charles Square, W10 · Saint Helens Gardens, W10 · Saint Lawrence Terrace, W10 · Saint Mark’s Road, W10 · Saint Michaels Gardens, W10 · Saint Quintin Avenue, W10 · Salters Road, W10 · Salusbury Road, NW6 · Shrewsbury Court, EC1Y · Shrewsbury Street, W10 · Sidmouth Road, NW2 · Sixth Avenue, W10 · Southern Row, W10 · St Charles Place, W10 · St Charles Square, W10 · St Helens Gardens, W10 · St Hildas Close, NW6 · St Johns Terrace, W10 · St Laurence Close, NW6 · St Laurences Close, NW6 · St Lawrence Terrace, W10 · St Marks Road, W10 · St Quintin Avenue, W10 · St Quintin Gardens, W10 · Station Terrace, NW10 · Summerfield Avenue, NW6 · Sunbeam Crescent, W10 · Sycamore Walk, W10 · Telford Road, W10 · The Avenue, NW6 · The Quadrant, W10 · The Ridge, RH8 · Tiverton Road, NW10 · Trevelyan Gardens, NW10 · Treverton Street, W10 · Wakeman Road, NW10 · Warfield Road, NW10 · Wellington Road, NW10 · West Row, W10 · Western Dwellings · Whitmore Gardens, NW10 · Windermere Avenue, NW6 · Wrentham Avenue, NW10 ·
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Maps


Land ownership in Willesden (1823) FREE DOWNLOAD
Map of land ownership in the Willesden area in 1823
City of London Corporation

Central London, north west (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Central London, north west.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)

John Rocque Map of Ealing and Acton (1762)
John Rocque (c. 1709–1762) was a surveyor, cartographer, engraver, map-seller and the son of Huguenot émigrés. Roque is now mainly remembered for his maps of London. This map dates from the second edition produced in 1762. London and his other maps brought him an appointment as cartographer to the Prince of Wales in 1751. His widow continued the business after his death. The map covers an area from Greenford in the northwest to Hammersmith in the southeast.
John Rocque, The Strand, London

Environs of London (1832) FREE DOWNLOAD
Engraved map. Hand coloured. Relief shown by hachures. A circle shows "Extent of the twopenny post delivery."
Chapman and Hall, London

London Underground Map (1921).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1921.
London Transport

The Environs of London (1865).  FREE DOWNLOAD
Prime meridian replaced with "Miles from the General Post Office." Relief shown by hachures. Map printed in black and white.
Published By J. H. Colton. No. 172 William St. New York

London Underground Map (1908).  FREE DOWNLOAD
London Underground map from 1908.
London Transport

Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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