Allum Lane, Elstree, Herts.

Road in/near Elstree, existing between 1437 and now

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Road · Elstree · WD6 ·
November
11
2017

Allum Lane links Borehamwood with Watling Street just north of Elstree village.

Elstree:Station Road, now Allum Lane, with Nicoll Farm on the left. Postcard dated 14 September 1910
Originally the road was much straighter but encroachment by landowners altered the course slightly. Allum Lane is mentioned as far back as 1437 and at that time was known as Alwynlane. Following the Enclosure Act of 1776, which divided up the Boreham Wood Common, roads such as this were improved from what originally would have been simple dirt tracks.

Along the road many grand houses were slowly built including Hillside (also known as Barham House and Clock House) build in 1789. The explorer (not the actor) Sir Richard Burton, explorer was there.

In the 1860s, the Midland railway reached the area and Elstree station was built at the Borehamwood end of the lane. Allum Lane then became more used as Elstree people used it to access their station. Lord Aldenham build a carriage drive from Aldenham House to meet Allum Lane at the Elstree end so that his estate could easier access the station.

Though many of the larger houses made way for housing, Allum Lane and the road remained rural at the Elstree end, even after the development of the estates of Borehamwood.

Allum Lane Cemetery saw its first burial in July 1962. It stands on the grounds of the old Radnor Hall Estate, which was demolished in the late 1950s.

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Elstree:Station Road, now Allum Lane, with Nicoll Farm on the left. Postcard dated 14 September 1910
User unknown/public domain

VIEW THE ELSTREE AREA IN THE 1750s
The 1750 Rocque map is bounded by Sudbury (NW), Snaresbrook (NE), Eltham (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1750 map does not display.

VIEW THE ELSTREE AREA IN THE 1800s
The 1800 mapping is bounded by Stanmore (NW), Woodford (NE), Bromley (SE) and Hampton Court (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1800 map does not display.

VIEW THE ELSTREE AREA IN THE 1830s
The 1830 mapping is bounded by West Hampstead (NW), Hackney (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Chelsea (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1830 map does not display.

VIEW THE ELSTREE AREA IN THE 1860s
The 1860 mapping is bounded by Brent Cross (NW), Stratford (NE), Greenwich (SE) and Hammermith (SW).
Outside these bounds, the 1860 map does not display.

VIEW THE ELSTREE AREA IN THE 1900s
The 1900 mapping covers all of the London area.

 

Elstree

Elstree is a village in the southermost area of Hertfordshire situated on Watling Street.

Though since boundary changes fully in Hertfordshire, until the 1990s it was half in Hertfordshire and half in Middlesex (now Greater London).

It is most famous for giving its name to the Elstree Film Studios in nearby Borehamwood where a number of famous British films were made.

Elstree has an airfield, with a paved runway, suitable for light aircraft use. The nearest railway station is Elstree & Borehamwood.






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Maps


Ordnance Survey of the London region (1939) FREE DOWNLOAD
Ordnance Survey colour map of the environs of London 1:10,560 scale
Ordnance Survey. Crown Copyright 1939.

Outer London (1901) FREE DOWNLOAD
Outer London shown in red, City of London in yellow. Relief shown by hachures.
Stanford's Geographical Establishment. London : Edward Stanford, 26 & 27, Cockspur St., Charing Cross, S.W. (1901)
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