Notting Hill

Suburb, existing between the 1820s and now

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Suburb · Notting Hill · W11 ·
September
6
2015

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill Carnival
Credit: Chris Croome
Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


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Notting Hill Carnival
Chris Croome

THE STREETS OF NOTTING HILL
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Addison Avenue, W11 Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North.
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
All Saints Road, W11 Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road.
Arundel Gardens, W11 Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s.
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Boxmoor Street, W11 Boxmoor Street was also known as Henry Place and Beaumont Street during its brief life.
Bulmer Mews, W11 Bulmer Mews is a tiny mews behind Notting Hill Gate.
Campden Hill Place, W11 Campden Hill Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Chepstow Crescent, W11 Chepstow Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Chepstow Villas, W11 Chepstow Villas is a road in W11 with a chequered history.
Clarendon Road, W11 Clarendon Road is one of the W11’s longest streets, running from Holland Park Avenue in the south to Dulford Street in the north.
Clydesdale Road, W11 Clydesdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove.
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood.
Colville Houses, W11 Colville Houses is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Road, W11 Colville Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Dale Row, W11 Dale Row is a street in Notting Hill.
Darnley Terrace, W11 Darnley Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Deanhill Court, SW14 A street within the W11 postcode
Denbigh Close, W11 Denbigh Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Road, W11 Denbigh Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Denbigh Terrace, W11 Denbigh Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Elgin Crescent, W11 Elgin Crescent runs from Portobello Road west across Ladbroke Grove and then curls round to the south to join Clarendon Road.
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill.
Evesham Street, W11 Evesham Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Freston Road, W11 Freston Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Hayden’s Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road.
Hayden’s Place, W11 Hayden’s Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hedgegate Court, W11 Hedgegate Court is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Road, W11 Holland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Horbury Crescent, W11 Horbury Crescent is a short and handsome half-moon shaped street between Ladbroke Road and Kensington Park Road, W11.
Horbury Mews, W11 Horbury Mews is a T-shaped mews in Notting Hill.
Hunt Close, W11 Hunt Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Gardens, W11 Kensington Park Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Kensington Park Road, W11 Kensington Park Road is one of the main streets in Notting Hill.
Kingsdale Gardens, W11 Kingsdale Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Gardens, W11 Ladbroke Gardens runs between Ladbroke Grove and Kensington Park Road.
Ladbroke Grove, W11 Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11.
Ladbroke Road, W11 Ladbroke Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Ladbroke Square, W11 The huge Ladbroke Square communal garden is part communal garden accessed from the backs of the houses lining it and part traditional London Square with roads between the houses and the square.
Ladbroke Terrace, W11 Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate.
Ladbroke Walk, W11 Ladbroke Walk, W11 is part of the Ladbroke Conversation Area.
Lambton Place, W11 Lambton Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Crescent, W11 Lansdowne Crescent has some of the most interesting and varied houses on the Ladbroke estate, as architects and builders experimented with different styles.
Lansdowne Rise, W11 Lansdowne Rise, W11 was originally called Montpelier Road.
Lansdowne Road, W11 Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lansdowne Walk, W11 Lansdowne Walk was named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham.
Ledbury Mews North, W11 Ledbury Mews North is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Mews West, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Lonsdale Road, W11 Lonsdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Lorne Gardens, W11 Lorne Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Mcgregor Road, W11 Mcgregor Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Nicholas Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Norland Road, W11 Norland Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Norland Square, W11 Norland Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Olaf Street, W11 Olaf Street is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Crescent, W11 Pembridge Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Gardens, W2 Pembridge Gardens is a street in Paddington.
Pembridge Mews, W11 Pembridge Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Pembridge Villas, W11 Pembridge Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Pencombe Mews, W11 Pencombe Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Penzance Place, W11 Penzance Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a portered Victorian mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens.
Portland Road, W11 Portland Road is a street in Notting Hill, rich at one end and poor at the other.
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market.
Pottery Lane, W11 Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street.
Powis Gardens, W11 Powis Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Mews, W11 Powis Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace.
Powis Terrace, W11 Powis Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Princedale Road, W11 Princedale Road was formerly Princes Road.
Princes Place, W11 Princes Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crecent, W11 Queensdale Crecent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Crescent, W11 Queensdale Crescent is a street in Notting Hill.
Queensdale Place, W11 Queensdale Place is a cul-de-sac which runs just off Queensdale Road.
Queensdale Road, W11 Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses.
Queensdale Walk, W11 Queensdale Walk is a small cul-de-sac with 2-storey cottages running south off Queensdale Road.
Rifle Place, W11 Rifle Place is a road in the W11 postcode area
Rosehart Mews, W11 Rosehart Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Rosmead Road, W11 Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road.
Royal Crescent Mews, W11 Royal Crescent Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Royal Crescent, W11 The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park.
Saint Anns Villas, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Saint Luke’s Road, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Saint Lukes Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Saint Marks Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Simon Close, W11 Simon Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Anns Villas, W11 St Ann’s Villas, leading into Royal Crescent, is a pleasant tree-lined if busy road.
St James Gardens, W11 St James Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is a road in the W11 postcode area
St James’s Gardens, W11 St James’s Gardens is an attractive garden square with St James Church in the middle of the communal garden.
St John’s Gardens, W11 St John’s Gardens runs around St John’s church.
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road.
St Lukes Mews, W11 St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11.
St Luke’s Mews, W11 St Luke’s Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
St Luke’s Road, W11 St Luke’s Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome.
Stanley Crescent, W11 Stanley Crescent was named after Edward Stanley.
Stanley Gardens Mews, W11 Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s.
Stanley Gardens, W11 Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s.
Swanscombe Road, W11 Swanscombe Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Talbot Road, W11 The oldest part of Talbot Road lies in London, W11.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road.
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Testerton Walk, W11 Testerton Walk is a street in Notting Hill.
Vernon Yard, W11 Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road.
Walmer Road, W11 Walmer Road is the oldest street in the area, dating from the eighteenth century or before.
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill.
West Cross Route, W11 The West Cross Route is a 1.21 km-long dual carriageway running north-south between the northern elevated roundabout junction with the western end of Westway (A40) and the southern Holland Park Roundabout.
Westbourne Grove Mews, W11 Westbourne Grove Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Grove, W11 Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wilby Mews, W11 Wilby Mews was named after Benjamin Wilby, who was involved in several 19th century development schemes.
Wilsham Street, W11 Wilsham Street was formerly known as St Katherine’s Road.



 

Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.
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