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Website · Bermondsey · NW6 · Contributed by Scott Hatton
MARCH
16
2017


The Underground Map is a project which is creating a history website for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

Latest on The Underground Map...
There are now over 23 000 articles on all variety of locations including amongst others, roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - use the Google Map control to change to a particular decade.The Underground Map project is creating a decade-by-decade series of historical maps of the area which lies within London's M25 ring.

From the 1800s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today.

Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence


 

Featured articles

SEPTEMBER
12
2018

 

The Angel
The Angel Public House is grade II listed and dates from the 1830s. The building potentially includes material from a 17th century building formerly occupying the site. The Angel name has been recorded since that date.

In the 15th century an inn and rest house for travellers called The Salutation was kept at or near this site by monks from Bermondsey Priory. In 1682 The Angel was in a position diagonally opposite its present site, and was referred to by the famous diarist Samuel Pepys as "the famous Angel." The former Redriffe stairs used to be located immediately to its west.

By the 19th century, The Angel marked the commencement of a continuous built-up river frontage running to the east. Gaps in the frontage are evident providing access to the river via stairs.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
11
2018

 

Albemarle Street, W1S
Albemarle Street has historic associations with Lord Byron, whose publisher John Murray was based here, and Oscar Wilde, a member of the Albemarle Club, where an insult he received led to his suing for libel and to his eventual imprisonment. Albemarle Street was built by a syndicate of developers headed by Sir Thomas Bond. The syndicate purchased a Piccadilly mansion called Clarendon House from Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle in 1684, which had fallen into ruin due to neglect caused by the dissolute duke’s spendthrift ways. It was sold for £20,000, a fifth less than the duke had paid for it only nine years previously despite the land values in the area increasing in the intervening period. The house was demolished and the syndicate proceeded develop the area. At that time the house backed onto open fields and the development of the various estates in Mayfair was just getting underway. The syndicate also built Old Bond Street, Dover Street and Stafford Street.

The Royal Institution is located at 21 Albemarle Street and forms an imposing backdrop on the street with its row of classical columns on its frontage. The building has been greatly enlarged and redeveloped since 1799 when the Instituti...
»more


SEPTEMBER
10
2018

 

Barlby Road, W10
Barlby Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10 Barlby Road started its life as Edinburgh Road, a small cul-de-sac street with a school, running from Ladbroke Grove, beside the railway lines towards Old Oak Common.

Today the start of Edinburgh Road can still be seen in Barlby Road, but it used to be of cobbles and tarmac whereas now it is part of a small concreted car park for the occupants of houses.

In 1902, five acres of land were quickly bought for the Clement Talbot Motor Works in North Kensington. It was established in 1903 as the UK’s first purpose-built car factory. The workshops, built in brick with the latest saw-tooth roof line liberally glazed to provide the maximum natural light, were equipped with the most modern machine tools from every part of the world.

Edinburgh Road was extended to provide access to the south front of the works and it was almost immediately renamed Barlby Road.

Barlby Road was then extended to connect Ladbroke Grove with North Pole Road and Scrubs Lane, providing a through road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
9
2018

 

Alma Grove, SE1
Alma Grove was formerly Alma Road, and before that Tenter Ground Lane. A map from 1850-51 confirms that at this time the local area remained largely undeveloped with the exception of Alma Grove (then Tenter Ground Lane) and Southwark Park Road (then Blue Anchor Road).

The name Alma Grove records both the date of its development and famous military victories of the Crimean War still fresh in the public’s mind at that time.


»read full article


SEPTEMBER
8
2018

 

Amelia Street, SE17
Amelia Street originally consisted of late 19th century tenement blocks built by James Pullen, a local builder, between 1886 and 1901. Amelia Street predated most of the streets in the area being of eighteenth century origin.

James Pullen & Son, who advertised themselves as “lead burners and manufacturers of the patent cast lead D trap & plumbers’, tinmen’s and blow pipe solder”, had a builder’s yard in Amelia Street and traded from premises at 73 Penton Place, Kennington Park Road.

Pullen acquired property in the area and the first block was erected in 1886 at the Penton Place end of Amelia Street. This was surrounded by controversy, as by-law approval for the development had been refused by the Metropolitan Board of Works.

The first two blocks were condemned upon completion but that they were allowed to remain when Mr Pullen agreed to change the design.

During the 1980s the buildings between Manor Place and the south side of Amelia Street were demolished by the council using their housing improvement powers. The demolition of the rest of the Pul...
»more


SEPTEMBER
7
2018

 

Great Windmill Street, W1F
Great Windmill Street has had a long association with music and entertainment, most notably the Windmill Theatre. The street took its name from a windmill on the site which was recorded 1585 and demolished during the 1690s. In a parliamentary survey of 1658 the mill was described as "well fitted with Staves and other materials".

The area was developed around 1665 but the building was speculative and of poor quality; this led to a royal proclamation in 1671 that prohibited unlicensed development in "Windmill Fields, Dog Fields and Soho". Later that year, Thomas Panton, one of the original speculators, was granted a licence to continue his scheme with the condition that it was supervised and directed by Sir Christopher Wren who was the Surveyor General of the King’s Works. By 1682, maps show that both sides of the street were developed along their whole length.

In 1767 the Scottish anatomist and physician William Hunter FRS built a large house at number 16 after demolishing an earlier large dwelling. Hunter’s house incorporated a large library, a museum and an anat...
»more


SEPTEMBER
6
2018

 

Eynsham Drive, SE2
Eynsham Drive dates from the late 1950s with the construction of the Abbey Wood Estate. A parade of shops was constructed in 1966 with Abbey Wood Library helping to form a focus for the new estate.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
5
2018

 

Albany Street, NW1
Albany Street runs from Marylebone Road to Gloucester Gate following the east side of Regent’s Park. The street was laid out during the 1820s, and takes its name from Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, the younger brother of King George IV.

The freeholds of the west side of the street are owned by the Crown Estate, as part of Regent’s Park. The southern part of the east side of the street is part of the Regent’s Park Estate.

The building numbering system has odd numbers on the west side, and even numbers on the east. At the Marylebone Road end is the Holy Trinity Church. Next is "The White House", formerly a set of luxury flats, and now a hotel renamed "The Melia White House". Both stand on traffic islands to themselves. Numbers 31 and 33 are Grade I listed buildings, designed by John Nash. Between 35 and 55 there is an inserted street. This area was occupied by a huge construction called "The Colosseum" designed by Decimus Burton. It was demolished in 1875, and replaced by houses called "Colosseum Terrace" in 1878.

At...
»more


SEPTEMBER
4
2018

 

Barfett Street, W10
Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10 Barfett Street forms part of the Queens Park Estate, built by the Artisans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company.

The Artisans Company’s first project was Shaftesbury Park, a development of 1,200 two-storey houses covering 42.5 acres built in 1872 on the site of a former pig farm in Battersea. The success of Shaftesbury Park led to the construction of Queen’s Park, built in 1874 on a far more ambitious scale on 76 acres of land to the west of London, adjacent to the railway line out of Paddington (Queen’s Park station opened in 1879), purchased from All Souls College, Oxford.

The architecture of that estate of some 2000 small houses is distinctively Gothic-revival, with polychrome brickwork, pinnacles and turrets along the bigger roads.

Barfett Street was originally called "B Street" since the Estate had street names of numbers and letters: Avenues 1-6 and streets A-P.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
3
2018

 

Mortimer Place, NW6
Mortimer Place can be found in Kilburn, NW6. A.A.Milne was born in Kilburn in 1882. The house where he was living was destroyed in the war when a V1 fell in the vicinity and the site is now occupied by Remsted House, part of the Mortimer Estate, at the junction of Mortimer Place and Kilburn Priory.

In 1948 the L.C.C. began clearing the area between Greville Road and Mortimer Place and Crescent, which it replaced with the Mortimer Crescent estate, eight smallscale, brick blocks of flats, which were opened c. 1955.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
2
2018

 

Adler Street, E1
Adler Street is one of the streets of London in the E1 postal area. The street was named after Nathan Marcus Adler, Chief Rabbi of Great Britain 1845–1890
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
1
2018

 

Abingdon Road, N3
Abingdon Road runs north east from Long Lane, roughly parallel with the North Circular Road. Now a development of typical Finchley suburbia, Abingdon Road was laid out in a narrow field backed by a footpath which ran from Bow Lane to Tarling Road past a gravel pit in Victorian times.

Tudor Primary School, now at the end of the road, was built between Abingdon Road and the footpath, cutting it off.
»read full article


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