Cheshire Street, E2

Road in/near Shoreditch, existing until now

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Road · Shoreditch · E2 ·
MARCH
22
2018
Cheshire Street is a street in the East End linking Brick Lane with Bethnal Green and Whitechapel.

Cheshire Street (1969).
Credit: David Granick (1912-80)
It has had various names in its history, such as Hare Street, and today forms part of Brick Lane Market on Sundays. The Cheshire Street part of the market is home to various Bric A Brac stalls; prior to the area become popular with artists, the market was a source of basic items (clothes, toys etc.) for working people from the East End.

The street runs parallel to the former Bishopsgate Goods Yard and the main railway track into Liverpool Street and the railway viaduct that used to carry trains into the good yard is one of the oldest brick rail viaducts in the world, the listed Braithwaite Viaduct. It is possible to see the original brick work of this viaduct from Grimsby Street, a tributary of Cheshire Street.

The old Carpenters Arms pub is also located on Cheshire Street. The notorious Kray twins bought the pub for their mother, who used to hold court in it at weekends. According to the last proprietors of the pub, the Krays installed a bespoke bar surface during the time they owned the pub - the surface employed was allegedly a coffin lid. Reggie Kray’s funeral procession went along Cheshire Street in 2000.

Cheshire Street is also home to the Repton Boys boxing club, London’s oldest boxing gym, alma mater to boxers such as Maurice Hope, Billy Walker, and Audley Harrison, not to mention underworld figures such as "Mad" Frankie Fraser.


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Cheshire Street (1969).
David Granick (1912-80)


 

Shoreditch

Shoreditch is a place in the London Borough of Hackney. It is a built-up district located 2.3 miles (3.7 km) north east of Charing Cross.

An old form of the name is Soersditch, and the origin is lost, though early tradition connects it with Jane Shore, the mistress of Edward IV.

It was the site of an Augustinian priory in the 12th Century until its dissolution in 1539. In 1576 the first playhouse (theatre) in England was opened, and in 1577 The Curtain theatre was opened in the middle of what is Curtain Road today.

During the 17th Century, wealthy traders and Huguenot silk weavers moved to the area, establishing a textile industry centered to the south around Spitalfields Market. The area declined along with the textile industry and from the end of the 19th Century to the 1960s, Shoreditch was a by-word for crime, prostitution and poverty.

Today Shoreditch is a busy and popular district, noted for its large number of art galleries, bars, restaurants, media businesses and an urban golf club.

Shoreditch High Street station officially opened to the public on 27 April 2010 with services running between Dalston Junction and New Cross or New Cross Gate. The station replaced nearby Shoreditch, which closed on 9 June 2006. The next station to the south is Whitechapel and to the north is Hoxton.
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.