Scott Hatton

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  1. Kensal Green — 5 comments
  2. The Estates of West Hampstead — 5 comments
  3. Rillington Place — 4 comments
  4. Shopping in Kilburn High Road (1970s) — 3 comments
  5. All Saints Road, W11 — 3 comments

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Theobald Street, WD6

Theobald Street runs from the centre of Borehamwood to the centre of Radlett.

Pitt House

From “Hampstead, its historic houses, its literary and artistic associations” Anna Maxwell (1912) Pitt House, known in the eighteenth century as Wildwoods and North End Place, has now attained its due name of honour, for here once lived the great statesman. It was during the retirement of the first Earl of Chatham, from 1766 to …

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Curiosities of London: M

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London MAGDALEN HOSPITAL, ST. GEORGE’S FIELDS, for the relief and reformation of unfortunate women andpeni-tent prostitutes, was projected by Robert Dingley, Jonas Hanway, and a few others, in 1758 j* …

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Curiosities of London: N-O

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London NEW RIVER, A FINE artificial stream, yielding almost half the water-supply of London, or nearly the whole of the City, and a large portion of the metropolis northward of …

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Curiosites of London: L

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London LAMBETH, ALSO called Lambhith, Lambhyde, and Lambhei, is probably derived from lam, dirt, and hyd or hythe, a haven j or from lamb and Tiythe. It was anciently a …

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Curiosities of London: I-K

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London INNS OF OLD LONDON. OF Olden Inns, up gateways, and consisting of rooms for refection below, and long projecting balustraded galleries above, leading to the chambers—time and change have …

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Curiosities of London: G-H

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London GARDENS. FITZSTEPHEN records that in the time of Henry II. (1154-118iquII. (119) the citizens of London had large and beautiful gardens to their villas. The royal garden at Westminster …

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Curiosites of London: D-F

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London DAGUERREOTYPE (THE). THE first experiment made in England with the Daguerreotype was exhibited by M. St. Croix, on Friday, September 13,1839, at No. 7, Piccadilly, nearly opposite the southern …

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Curiosities of London: C

This was scanned in from an old document which has caused numerous misreadings of words. As time moves on, this will be improved. Curiosities of London CANONBURY TOWER, AT the northern extremity of the parish of Islington, denotes the site of the country house of the Prior of the Canons of St. Bartholomew; hence, it …

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Curiosities of London: A-B

ADMIRALTY OFFICE, THE FORMS the left flank of the detachment of Government Offices on the north side of Whitehall. It occupies the site of Wallingford House, from the roof of which Archbishop Usher saw King Charles I. led out to execution in the front of Whitehall Palace, and swooned at the sad scene. Wallingford House …

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