Some street name derivations

Albemarle Street W.1
Takes its name from the second Duke of Albermarle, son of General Monk.
Aldermanbury E.C.2 – Saxon name for Eldermen (elder statesmen) Bury (home or house) stood where now stands Guild Hall.
Aldersgate E.C.1 – From the Roman gate for the Elders that led to the north and Scotland.
Aldgate E.1 – The Oldest Roman gate that lead to the East and Roman town of Colchester.
Aldwych W.C.2 – Saxon name meaning Ald (Old) Wic (Village).
Amen Court E.C.4 – Below the cross of Saint Paul’s, Where in medievil times were held processions, with rosaries calling “Amen”.
Andre Street E.8 – After Major John Andre, hanged wrongfully as a spy in 1780 in the American war of Independance. He was born in Pond house, Clapton.
Andrew Borde Street W.C.2 – Named after Andrew Borde, Andrew Boorde, Doctor Boord, a physician and holy man who was no doubt a learned physician (quack) he was imprisoned in the Fleet, where he made his will on 9 April 1549. Andrew Borde was also the last Master of St Giles Lepers’ Hospital, which stood on the corner of this street from 11th to 16th century.
Arnold Circus E.1 – Named after Sir Arthur Arnold, an alderman in the late 19th century.
Balls Pond Road N.1 – At the end of the seventeenth centuary, on John Ball’s land , was a pond well stocked with fowl for the gentlemen visiting his tavern to shoot.
Battersea S.W.11 – Westminster monks from St Peters used the place for convalescent homes, the name was Patricsey Island, (St peter’s Island).
Baker Street W.1 – A street in the City of Westminster, which is famous for its connection to the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, of the late 19th and early 20th century, created by British author and physician Arthur Conan Doyle. Holmes was said to have lived at 221B Baker Street (an upper-storey flat at 221 Baker Street; in early notes it was described as Upper Baker Street), where he spent many of his professional years with his friend and colleague Dr. Watson, who lived at 221B Baker Street. The street takes its name from the builder William Baker who laid the street out in the 18th century
Bayswater W.2 – The name is a corruption of Bayards Water, a former well that stood in Hyde Park.
Bell Yard W.C.2 – A small lane off the Stand where once stood the Bell hostel that was owned by the Knights Templer. Nearby land being used for training for the defence of the holy lands of Palestine.
Berkley Square W.1
The Square was made in 1698 from the gardens of Berkley House, the home of Lord Berkley of Stratton, whose name lives on also in Stratton Street off the Square.
Bermondsey Street S.E.1 – Towards the southern end of the Street, once stood a Priory or Abbey of St. Saviours called Bermond’s Eye in Southwark, founded by Alwin Childe, in the year 1081. The Street as well as the area became known as Bermondsey.
Berners Street W.1 – Josias Berners bought a small estate close to Hanway Street, his ancestor William Berners between 1750 – 1763 built what is today Berners Street.
Bevis Marks E.C.4 – Named after a large house and gardens belonging to the Abbots of Bury in Suffolk with the house being called Buries Markes, Corrupted to Bevis Marks.
Billiter Street E.C.3 – Once home to a medieval Bell Foundry, Billiter from the ancient French word for ‘Bell Founder.’
Birchin Lane E.C.3 – The builder and owner of houses in this lane was Birchervere.
Black Prince Road S.E.1 – Edward III gave his son Edward the Black Prince 1330-76 the manor of Vauxhall and Kennington.
Bloomsbury Street/Place/Way W.C.1 – The name Bloomsbury is derived from a William Blemund, who was Lord of the Manor at the time of Henry III. After passing through several hands it came into the possession of Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, the Patron of Shakespeare. It passed to his granddaughter, Lady Rachel, who by her marriage to William, Lord Russell, brought it into the Bedford Familly, who have supplied much of the nomenclature of the district.
Bond Street W.1 – Sir Thomas Bond a property developer from Peckham laid out a number of streets in this part of the west end.
Britton Street E.C.1 – Named after Thomas Britten a 17th century coal-man who had a great opera voice who performed with Mr Handel in nearby Jerusalem Passage and created the first musical concerts in England.
Byward Street E.C.3 – From a byword, password spoken to Beefeaters from the nearby Tower of London.
Carlton Gardens S.W.1 – Designed by John Nash and built in 1830. at Number 2 Lord Kitchener would turn up for work each day in full field marshal’s uniform. It was here one day that he devised his First World War poster, with the famous slogan, ‘Your Country Needs You.’
Chancery Lane E.C.1 – Called New Street and running down from the north of Holborn, with the residence of important officers of state, renamed Chancellor’s Lane, becoming known as Chancery Lane.
Chenies Street W.C.1 – Takes its name from the Buckinghamshire village where since 1556, the Russell family have been buried.
Chester Square/Street S.W.1 – Named after the city of Chester.
Clarges Street W.1 – Sir Thomas Clarges, an important politician who built this street that was named after him.
Cloth Fair E.C.1 – The narrow street named Cloth Fair, stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times, and runs by the side of the ancient church of St Bartholomew the Great, where some of the buildings have survived the Great Fire of London 1666, numbers 41 and 42, was built between 1597 and 1614.
Cold Bath Square E.C.1 – So called from a well of cold water that stood here in fields. In 1794 a house of correction was built on these fields.
College Hill E.C.4 – Named after Sir Richard Whittington’s college, set up here in the early part of the fifteenth century.
Cons Street S.E.1 – Emma Cons was the founder of the Roayal Victoria Coffee Music Hall, that later became known as the Old Vic.
Coventery Street W.C.2 – Henry Coventry, King Charles the II ‘s secretary of state brought a house in 1672 that he named Coventry house, the street was later named after him
Crane Court, Fleet Street E.C.4 – At the entrance to this court stood the Two Crane Inn Tavern.
Cromwell Road S.W.7 – Once known as Cromwell Lane, named after one of Cromwell’s sons who lived here.
Danvers Street S.W.3 – Sir John Danvers, who died in 1655 and first taught us the way of Italian gardens, had his mansion Danvers House which spread from the river to the Kings Road. Sir John served at the Court of Charles I, although afterwards fought for Parliament and signed King Charles’s death warrant in 1649. Danvers Street was built on the site of his garden.
Dollis Hill/Road/ N.W.2 – Named after the Dollis Brook that runs from Arkley and joins up with the Mutton Brook to form the River Brent. Dollis comes from the Saxon word ‘Dwllice’ meaning ‘erratic’.
Du Cane Road, East Acton – Edmund Du Cane, designed the Wormwood Scrubs Prison in the fields of Wormholt Scrubs, ‘holt’ meaning woods. The road leading to the prison takes Edmund’s name.
Dukes Place E.C.3 – Named after Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, beheaded in 1572.
Eaton Square/Place/Mews S.W.1 – Eaton Hall in Cheshire is the principal seat of the Duke of Westminster, owner of these streets and land in Westminster.
Eccleston Street/Square S.W.1 – Derives its name from Eccleston in Cheshire, where the Grosvenor family own property.
Edgware Road N.W.2/ N,W.9/ W.2 – This is the old Roman Road of Watling Street that ran from Dover to Chester.
Edwardes Square W.8 – Derived its name from William Edwardes, 2nd Lord Kensington that was on part of his Holland House Estate.
Essex Road N.1 – Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, had a country house here in the sixteenth century where he often entertained Queen Elizabeth I. The Old Queens Head pub was built on the site of his old house.
Exmouth Market E.C.1 – Built on land formerly known as Spa Fields. The name celebrates Admiral Lord Exmouth (1757-1833) who distinguished himself at the battle of Lake Champlain.
Fetter Lane E.C.1 – Corrupted from Fewtar’s or Fautre that was the name for a spear rest, that was made here or closes by.
Finsbury Pavement E.C.2 – Named after the first pavement of firm ground in the marshy Moorfields.
Fouberts Place W.1 – Named after a French man who had a riding school here in the reign of Charles II.
Frith Street W.1 – Richard Frith is remembered as the builder of this Soho Street.
Furnival’s Inn E.C.1 – Furnival’s Inn, where Dickens later wrote Pickwick Papers, took its name from Sir Richard Furnival, who possessed two Messuages and 13 shops there during the reign of Richard II. The Prudential Assurance Company the red brick building at Holborn Bars is sprawled over what was once Furnival’s Inn, the name only survives in the little street opposite.
George Yard E.C.3 – Now the courtyard of Barclay’s banks H.Q. Was first an ordinary house that was coverted into a public house called ‘The George’. Distroyed in the great fire of 1666, becoming a public square. In the twelfth centuary, standing on the corner of Lombard street, was the house of the Earl of Ferrers, where his brother was murdered, and his body thrown onto the street.
Goodge Street W.1- Named after John Goodge a carpenter, his two nephews developed Crab Tree Fields forming Goodge Street in 1740.
Grafton Way W.1 – The second Duke of Grafton wanted a short cut transporting his cattle from Paddington to Islington. With a few farmers and friends he won a petition from parliament to build a turnpike along which is present day Grafton Way.
Gray’s Inn Road W.C.1 – John de Gray gave this land now covered by the Gray’s Inn law chambers to St Bartholemew’s Priory in the year 1314, and it was given that masses would be said for his soul.
Great Peter Street S.W.1 – Great Peter Street bears the name of the patron saint of Westminster Abbey. St Peter at Westminster is the formal name of Westminster Abbey.
At a house on the corner of Great Peter Street and Tufton Street, once resided, the notorious Colonel Blood, who tried to steal the Crown Jewels and Regalia from the Tower of London. From Tufton Street to Millbank Great Peter Street was at one time called Wood Street, as our picture insert shows.

Old street sign of Wood Street, Westminster – showing the former name of the southside of Great Peter Street. Picture courtesy of Jack, taken from scaffolding.
Great Turnstile W.C.1 – In the 17th century, there stood a revolving barrier that did allow pedestrians to pass from Holborn into Lincolns Inn Fields.
Gun Street E.1 – Gunners at the Tower made their weekly repairs here on the former artillery ground.
Half Moon Sreet W.1 – Deriving its name from a long lost tavern, renown for its considerable repute.
Halkin Street S.W.1 -The name comes from Halkin Castle in Flintshire.
Hallam Street W.1 – Takes its name from the historian Henry Hallam who lived close by at No. 67 Wimpole Street.
Hanging Sword Alley E.C.4 – John Stow says, ‘Then is Water Lane, running down, by the west side of a house called the Hanging Sword, to the Thames.’ Stow remarks can certainly be traced back to the 1560’s and the Alley was probably here long before that, when it was known as Ouldwood Alley and formed part of the Bishop of Salisbury’s estate.
Hanway Street/Place W.1 – Major John Hanway appears in the rate-books from 1710 and the street itself appearers in the rate-books in 1725.
Harrowby Street W.1 – Remembers Dudley Ryder, Ist Earl of Harrowby
Henriques Street E.1 – Once named Berner Street with the name changed after Jack the Rippers third victim, and subsequently named after Sir Basil Henriques.
Holland Street S.E.1 – In 1630 Elizabeth Holland (Madam Holland) opened her first-class brothel establishment Hollands Leaguer, on the site now covered by Hopton Street and Holland Street. The brothel was surrounded by a moat, gatehouse and drawbridge with plesant walks alongside trees and shrubberies in what was once Paris Gardens House; covering the area now known as Paris Gardens.
Honor Oak S.E.5 – At the summit of this road there was a tree known as the Oak of Honour, where Queen Elizabeth 1 on one of her excursions on horse back from Greenwich, dined beneath its shade. Many years later the oak was struck by lightning, and was replaced by a succesor.
Horseferry Road S.W.1 – The point where an ancient horse ferry took passengers from Thorney Island (Westminster) to Lamb Hythe (Lambeth) Where Lambeth bridge now stands. King James the II fleeing London threw the Great seal into the Thames at this point and was picked up by the Horse ferryman in 1688.
Judd Street W.C.1 – Takes its name from Sir Andrew Judd, Lord Mayor, 1551-2, “erected one notable free schoole at Tonbridge in Kent” he was a land owner of St Pancras. Thus kentish names like Tonbridge Street in the area.
Kings Cross N.1 – The Station at Kings cross took it’s name from the statue of George the IV that was at the cross road with Pentonville Road and Grays Inn Road.
Kings Road S.W.1 – Once an old footpath through fields taken over by Charles II, as his own private road leading him to Richmond Palace.
Lambeth S.E.1 – Original name was Lambhythe, Hythe being a Dock where lambs were transported.
Lamb’s Conduit Street W.C.1 – In Henry VIII’s time there was a Kentish man named William Lamb who built “a faire conduit” in Holborn where there was spring water as clear as crystal. The water was carried along in lead pipes from the north fields for more than two thousand yards at his own cost of more than fifteen hundred pounds. The conduit was removed in 1746, but Lamb’s name remains at the end of the street were his conduit once stood.
Lant Street S.E.1 – Derives its name from the Lant family who inherited the estates known as Southwark Olace which was formerly in the possesion of Heath, Archbishop of York.
Lennox Gardens S.W.3 – Named after Lord William Lennox.
Liverpool Street E.C.2 – Named after the Prime Minister, Lord Liverpool. Also home to the Great Eastern Railway, one of London’s largest stations.
Lombard Street E.C.3 – After the Jewish moneylenders based around here were expelled from England in 1290, the Italian’s from Lombard arrived here in the thirteenth-century to collect taxes due to the Pope.
Lots Road S.W.3 – In 1544 it was recorded as lez lotte when the name discribed the “lots” of ground which were “originally part of the manor over which the parishoners held Lammas rights”. Thus bringing the words allotments into present day word.
Lupus Street S.W.1 – Named after Hugh Lupus Earl of Chester.
Marble Arch W.1 – This is a landmark structure near Speaker’s Corner in Hyde Park, at the western end of Oxford Street. It was designed by John Nash in 1828, based on the triumphal arch of Constantine in Rome. It is built of white Carrara marble. It was originally erected on The Mall as a gateway to the new Buckingham Palace (rebuilt by Nash from the former Buckingham House), but was found to be too narrow for the state coach, and had to be moved in 1851 to its present location. at the north east corner of Hyde Park.
Mile End Road E.1 – The first milestone from the Roman Wall at Aldgate stood near to Stepney Green and the Mile End Road.
Milner Square N.1 – Thomas Milner (1806-84) an active politician and friend of Disraeli and Charles Dickens owned many acres of Islington.
Millbank S.W.1 – From the fourteenth centuary Westminster Abbey mill that stood at the junction of Great college street, and begun as a riverside walk from the Abbey to Chelsea.
Notting Hill W.11 – Known as Knottynghull in the 14th century, to Noding Hill in 1680. The manor which stood here in the IIth century was part of the estates of the De Veres. The only street name to is Notting Hill Gate, which pass over the site of an early turnpike gate.
Oxford Street W.1 – Takes its name from the road leading to oxford. Until 1725 it was known as Tyburn Road which lead to the Tyburn Hanging Tree.
Panton Street W.C.2 – Colonel Thomas Panton, having made an enormous fortune out of gambling, decided never to gamble again. Instead he bought Shaver’s Hall (named not from a barbers but from Lord Dunbar who lost £3,000 there at one sitting, whereon it was said a nothern lord was shaved there) which stood on the north-east corner of the Haymarket and Coventry Street, all the way down to present day Panton Street. He demolished the gambling hall to build over.
Pye Street S.W.1 – Derives its name from Sir Robert Pye, member for Westminster in the time of Charles I.
Plough Court E.C.3 – A tavern of the same name stood here and the poet Alexander Pope was born here in 1688.
Purser’s Cross S.W.6 – On the 7th of August 1738, a highwayman having commited several robberies on Finchley Common, was pursued to London. He thought he was safe in a public house in Burlington Gardens, (near Piccadilly) though it was not long before he was pursued again. He escaped by horse and rode through Hyde Park where gentlemans servants who were airing their horses did give chase, and persued him to Fulham Fields, where the Highwayman having no escape, threw money to the peasants at work in the fields, and told them ‘they would soon witness the end of an unfortunate man’. He pulled out his pistol, clapped it to his ear, and shot himself. He was buried at the cross road with a stake through him, it was never discovered who he was.
Peter’s Hill E.C.4 – Named after the church of the same name, built in the twelfth century. Burnt in the great fire of 1666, and not rebuilt. The churchyard today is remembered by an inscription on a modern wall.
Peter’s Lane E.C.1 – Listed in Stow’s Survay as St Peter’s Lane, the church once stood close to the tavern called Cross Keys. Today a modern office block stands here but the sign lives on. Opposite the lane is the old site of Hicks Hall, the old Sessions house built by Sir Baptis Hicks in the seventeenth century.
Playhouse Yard E.C.4 – Named after the Blackfriars theatre which stood here in Shakespeare’s time and where his play’s were performed.
Piccadilly W.1 – The name is taken from the collar or neckerchief called a piccdil, that was made by a tailor close by in the Haymarket.
Pickering Place S.W.1 – Hidden just behind Berry Brothers and Rudd is a quite and unspoilt Georgian corner of London. Built by William Pickering as a hide-a-way from his money making coffee company.
Pottery Lane W.11 – Takes its name from the brickfields at its northern end, where high-quality clay was dug from about 1818. The original kiln still stands and has been extended and converted into a three-bedroom house, and dates back to about 1820.
Praed Street W.2 – Named after Sir William Praed, first chairman and for many years manager of the Regent Canal company.
Quick Street N.1 – Recalls the favourite comedian of King George III John Quick.
Red Lion Square W.C.1 – Formerly known as Red Lion Fields where in the early 17th century stood the Red Lion Inn, and it was here that Cromwell’s body was dragged and rested at the Inn. It is said his decapitated head was buried somewhere under the present day square.
Rochester Row S.W.1 – In 1666 the Bishop of Rochester had a house here.
Romilly Street W.1 – A small side turning that runs behined Shafsbury Avenue and takes its name from the lawyer Samuel Romilly, who was successful in campaigning to abolish the death penalty for petty crimes such as theft during 1810.
Rotten Row S.W.1 – A corruption of route du roi.
Russell Street ect W.C.1 – See Bloomsbury.
Rutland Gate S.W.1 – Takes its name from the Duke of Rutland.
Seven Dials W.C.2 – The work of building Seven Dials had begun in 1693, on what was then called Cock-and-pie Fields taken from a nearby inn. Thomas Neale undertook the task of making a great junction, and, in the centre he erected a pillar with seven dials, one for each of the streets at the junction. In 1733 the pillar was taken down as there was believed to be a fortune lodged at the base, but no money was found, and the pillar was transported to Weybridge in Surrey. Good news it was returned to the original spot just a couple of years ago.
Shepherd Market W.1 – Builder/architect, Edward Shepherd, who had a hand in the building of Grosvenor and Cavendish Squares. He obtained permission to build a cattle market in May Fair in 1738, where every May a large fair was held around the cattle market. The annual fair gave its name to the area of Mayfair.
Southamton Buildings W.C.1 – Here once stood the house of the 4th Earl of Southampton son of Shakespeare’s patron. In 1638 he replaced the house with tenements on the land now known as Southampton Buildings, he moved to a new mansion in Bloomsbury named Southampton House, built where Southampton Place now stands. See also Bloomsbury.
St Johns Wood N.W.8 – Part of the forest of Middlesex now known as St Johns Wood was in the manor of Lilestone (Lisson). It was in the reign of Edward I that a gift of the woods was made from Otho, son of William de Lileston to the Knights Templers, and later passed to the Knights Hospitallers of St Johns of Jerusalem, when it became St Johns Wood and has so remained ever since.
Spitalfields E.1 – In 1197, Mr Walter Brune, a Londoner, founded in the fields just east of Bishopsgate a large hospital for poor brethren of the order of St. Austin; the surrounding pastures took the name Hospital-fields, and then the cockney slang dropping the first two letters to form the name (Ho) “Spitalfields.”
Stafford Street W.1 – Named after Margaret Stafford partner of developer Sir Thomas Bond who built on this site in the seventeenth century.
Stag Place S.W.1 – The old brewhouse of the Westminster Abbey moved here after the dissolution of the monasteries in the sixteenth century. Later known as the Stag Brewery, was demolished in 1959,
Storey’s Gate S.W.1 – Abraham Storey, one of Wren’s master-masons, built Storey’s gate that now remembers his name.
Strype Street E.1 – John Strype,the son of a Huguenot weaver, was born here in 1643. He became an antiquary, historian and a parson.
Tabard Street S.E.1 – Name taken from the Tabard Inn, that was already an ancient tavern when the poet Geoffrey Chaucer and the Pilgrim Fathers left for their long journey to America. The name Tabard comes from a sleeveless coat, open on both sides, with a square collar, winged at the shoulders, commonly worn by noblemen in wars as their coat-of-arms. The sign of this tavern was this garment.
Tabernacle Street E.C.1 – In 1567 this Meadow was home to three windmills and known as Windmill Hill, and it is where George Whitefield’s “Tabernacle” was built by his supporters after he separated from Wesley in 1741.
Thavie’s Inn E.C.1 – Named after an honest man, John Thavie who was an armourer, and lived there in the time of Edward III. It was sold in 1769 and now is hardly noticeable as it forms part of Holborn Circus.
Throgmorton Street E.C.2 – Corruption of the name of Nicholas Throckmorton, Elizabeth I’s ambassador to France and Scotland.
Tokenhouse Yard E.C.2 – Before the reign of James I, stood on this site the manufacturer of tokens that were used as the copper coinage of England.
Turnmill Street E.C.1 – Shakespeare’s Turnbull-Street, a well known street for harlots in his time. It was Trimullstrete in Edward III’s day, with three water-mills in a graceful River Fleet setting.

 

Street names etymologies
This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Hatton Garden. Its area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are the generally accepted ones of Clerkenwell Road to the north, Farringdon Road to the east, Holborn and Charterhouse Street to the south and Gray’s Inn road to the west.

Baldwins Gardens – from Richard Baldwin (or Baldwyn), gardener to Queen Elizabeth I and treasurer of the Middle Temple, who owned property in the area in the 16th century[24][25]
Beauchamp Street – from Beauchamp Court, the Warwickshire birthplace of Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, local property owner[26][27]
Black Bull Yard – unknown; this yard has now largely been covered by shop developments and is not accessible to the public
Bleeding Heart Yard – thought to be from the sign of a former pub in this area called the Bleeding Heart[28][29][30]
Brooke Street, Brooke’s Court and Brooke’s Market – after Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[31][27]
Charterhouse Street – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France – a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371[32][33]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area to this district[34][35]
Dorrington Street – corruption of ‘Doddington’, from Anne Doddington, wife of Robert Grenville who owned a house near here in the 17th century[36][27]
Ely Court and Ely Place – after the Bishops of Ely, Cambridgeshire who owned much of this area prior to 1659[37][38]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[39][40][41]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[42][43]
Greville Street – from Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[44][27]
Hatton Garden, Hatton Place and Hatton Wall – from Sir Christopher Hatton, who was ceded much of this area from the Bishops of Ely by Elizabeth I in 1577-1580[45][46]
Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here[47][48][49][50]
Kirby Street – from Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire[51][46]
Leather Lane – thought to come not from ‘leather’ but from Leofrun, a personal name in Old English; formerly known as Le Vrunelane (13th century), Loverone Lane (14th century) and Liver Lane[52][53]
Leigh Place – from the Barons Leigh, who bought land in the area from the Baldwin family in 1689[24][25]
Lily Place
Onslow Street
Portpool Lane – thought to be a corruption of ‘Purta’s Pool’, the local area is recorded as the manor of Purtepol in the early 13th century;[54][55] written “Purple Lane” in Arlidge’s Survey
Saffron Hill and Saffron Street – these used to be the gardens of the Bishops of Ely, where they grew saffron[56][57]
St Cross Street – originally Cross Street, as it crossed land belonging to the Hatton family; the ‘St’ was added in 1937 to avoid confusion with numerous streets of the same name[58][59]
Verulam Street – from 16th-17th century lawyer, scientist and philosopher Francis Bacon, later created Baron Verulam, who had chambers at Gray’s Inn opposite[60][61]
Viaduct Buildings – after their position directly adjacent to Holborn Viaduct[50]
Waterhouse Square – after Alfred Waterhouse, architect of Holborn Bars, also known as the Prudential Assurance Building, which surrounds the square

Street name etymologies
Adelphi has no formally defined boundaries, though they are generally agreed to be: Strand to the north, Lancaster Place to the east, Victoria Embankment to the south and Charing Cross station to the west. The small set of streets east of Northumberland Avenue are included here for convenience.

Adam Street – after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s[4][5]
Adelphi Terrace – the area was developed by the brothers John and Robert Adam, in the 1760s, and was named after adelphos, the Greek for ‘brother’[6][7]
The Arches – presumably descriptive, after the railway arches here
Buckingham Arcade and Buckingham Street – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets[8][9]
Carting Lane – thought to be from the carts that brought good to and from the wharf formerly located here; until the 1830s it was called Dirty Lane[10]
Charing Cross – after the Eleanor cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[11][12]
Corner House Street – unknown
Craven Passage and Craven Street – after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s[13][14]
Durham House Street – this was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in Medieval times[15][16]
Embankment Place – after the Thames Embankment, built in the Victorian era[17]
George Court – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets[8][18]
Hungerford Lane – after the Hungerford family, who owned a house on this site in the 15th century, later sold due to debts to create Hungerford Market, before the building of Charing Cross station[19][20][21]
Ivybridge Lane – named after a former ivy-covered bridge that crossed an old watercourse on this spot; the bridge was demolished sometime before 1600[22][23]
John Adam Street – after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s[24][25]
Lancaster Place – former site of the Savoy Palace. It passed into the ownership of the earls of Lancaster in the 13th century, the most famous of which was John of Gaunt, who owned the palace at the times of its destruction in Peasant’s Revolt of 1381[26][27]
Northumberland Avenue and Northumberland Street – site of the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland[28][29]
Robert Street and Lower Robert Street – after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s[30]
Savoy Buildings, Savoy Court, Savoy Hill, Savoy Place, Savoy Row, Savoy Steps, Savoy Street and Savoy Way – the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245[31][32]
Strand and Strand Lane – from Old English ‘stond’, meaning the edge of a river; the river Thames formerly reached here prior to the building of the Thames Embankment[33][34]
Victoria Embankment – after Queen Victoria, reigning queen at the time of the building of the Thames Embankment[35][36]
Villiers Street – after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets[37][38]
Watergate Walk – after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House[39][40]
York Buildings and York Place – a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich – in the reign of Queen Mary it was acquired by the archbishops of York and named ‘York House’; York Place was formerly ‘Of Alley’, after George Villiers (see Buckingham Street above)

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Belgravia. The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of the area viz. South Carriage Drive to the north, Grosvenor Gardens/Place/Square to the east, Buckingham Palace Road/Victoria railway line to the south-east and Chelsea Bridge Road, Lower Sloane Street/Sloane Square/Sloane Street to the west.

Albert Gate – named for Albert, Prince Consort, husband of Queen Victoria [1]
Ann’s Close – unknown [2]
Avery Farm Row – after a former farm here of this name; ‘Avery’ is a corruption of ‘Ebury’ [3][4]
Belgrave Mews South, Belgrave Mews West, Belgrave Place, Belgrave Square, Belgrave Yard, Lower Belgrave Street and Upper Belgrave Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), after their home estate of Belgrave, Cheshire; the building of the this area started under the tutelage of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster[5][6]
Bloomfield Terrace – alteration of ‘Blomfield’, after Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London 1828 – 1856, who consecrated the nearby Church of St Barnabas, Pimlico[7][8][8]
Boscobel Place – after a former pub here called the Royal Oak, by association with Charles II who hid from Parliamentary forces in the Royal Oak at Boscobel House [9][10]
Bowland Yard –
Bourne Street – as this used to run beside the river Westbourne [11][12]
Buckingham Palace Road – by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham [13][14]
Bunhouse Place – after a former shop here selling Chelsea buns [15]
Burton Mews –
Cadogan Lane and Cadogan Place – after Lord Cadogan, owner of this land when Henry Holland started building on this land in the 1750s [16][17]
Capener’s Close – after John Capener,19th century builder who owned a carpentry/undertakers business here [18][19]
Caroline Terrace – unknown [20]
Chapel Street – after a former Lock chapel here adjacent to a hospital, both now demolished [21][22]
Chelsea Bridge Road – as it leads to Chelsea Bridge opened 1858 [23]
Chesham Close, Chesham Mews, Chesham Place and Chesham Street – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners, whose seat was at Chesham, Buckinghamshire [24][25]
Chester Close, Chester Cottages, Chester Mews, Chester Row, Chester Square, Chester Square Mews, Chester Street and Little Chester Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Chester [26][27]
Cliveden Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Cliveden House in Buckinghamshire in the late 19th century [28][29]
Cundy Street – after Thomas Cundy and his son, surveyors to local landowners the Grosvenors in the 19th century [30][31]
Dorset Mews – presumably after the Dorset landholding of the Grosvenor family
Dove Walk –
D’Oyley Street – after Sarah D’Oyley, who inherited land here from her grandfather Hans Sloane [32][33]
Duplex Ride –
Eaton Close, Eaton Mews North, Eaton Mews South, Eaton Mews West, Eaton Place, Eaton Row, Eaton Square, Eaton Terrace, Eaton Terrace Mews, South Eaton Place and West Eaton Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [34][35]
Ebury Bridge Road, Ebury Mews, Ebury Mews East, Ebury Square and Ebury Street – as this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury, thought to have originated as a Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon toponym ‘eyai’, which means ‘island’ [36] in reference to a marsh that once dominated the area [37][35]
Eccleston Mews and Eccleston Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Eccleston, Cheshire [37][29]
Elizabeth Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Elizabeth Leveson-Gower was the wife of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster [29]
Ellis Street – after Anne Ellis, who inherited land here from her grandfather Hans Sloane [32][38]
Frederic Mews – unknown [39]
Gatliff Road – after John (or Charles) Gatliff, secretary of the Metropolitan Association for Improving the Dwellings of the Industrious Classes [40][41]
Gerald Road – unknown [42]
Graham Terrace – after its 19th century lessee/builder William Graham [43][44]
Groom Place – after a former pub here called the Horse and Groom [45]
Grosvenor Cottages, Grosvenor Crescent, Grosvenor Crescent Mews, Grosvenor Gardens, Grosvenor Gardens Mews North, Grosvenor Gardens Mews South, Grosvenor Place and Grosvenor Road – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [5][46]
Halkin Arcade, Halkin Street and West Halkin Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Halkyn Castle in Wales [47][29]
Harriet Street and Harriet Walk – after Harriet Lowndes of the Lowndes family, former local landowners [48][25]
Headfort Place – after Thomas Taylour, 3rd Marquess of Headfort, who lived nearby on Belgrave Square [49][50]
Hobart Place – named after Robert Hobart, 4th Earl of Buckinghamshire, who lived nearby on Grosvenor Place [51][52]
Holbein Mews and Holbein Place – after Hans Holbein the Younger, who painted local families for a period in the 1520s; its former name was The Ditch, as it lay next to the river Westbourne [51][52]
Kinnerton Place North, Kinnerton Place South, Kinnerton Street and Kinnerton Yard – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Lower Kinnerton, Cheshire [53][54]
Knightsbridge – unknown; there are several theories – see Knightsbridge#Origins of name
Laneborough Place –
Lowndes Close, Lowndes Place, Lowndes Square and Lowndes Street – after the Lowndes family, former local landowners [24][25]
Lyall Mews, Lyall Mews West and Lyall Street – after Charles Lyall, business partner with local landowners the Lowndes [55][25]
Lygon Place – unknown [56]
Minera Mews – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Minera, Wales [53][29]
Montrose Place – as this lay near a house owned by the Dukes and Duchesses of Montrose [57][58]
Motcomb Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster owned land in Motcombe, Dorset [59][29]
Old Barrack Yard – as this approached a former barracks located on Wilton Place [60][61]
Ormonde Place – probably after the Dukes of Ormonde, who owned Ormonde House in Chelsea
Palace Mews – probably by association with the nearby Buckingham Palace Road
Passmore Street – after its 1830s builder Richard Passmore [62][63]
Pembroke Close – unknown [64]
Phipp’s Mews –
Pimlico Road – as it leads to Pimlico, possibly named after Ben Pimlico, 17th century brewer [65][66][67]
Pont Street – thought to be from the French ‘pont’ (bridge), over the river Westbourne [68][69]
Ranelagh Grove – after Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh who owned a house near here in the late 17th century [70][71]
Rembrandt Close –
Roberts Mews – after Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, of the local landowning family the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave) [72]
St Barnabas Street – after the nearby Church of St Barnabas, Pimlico [73][74]
St Michael’s Mews –
Sedding Street and Sedding Studios – after John Dando Sedding, designer of the nearby Holy Trinity, Sloane Street church [75][76]
Semley Place – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned a property called Semley [77][29][76]
Serpentine Walk – as it leads to The Serpentine lake in Hyde Park
Seville Street – unknown; it was formerly Charles Street, after Charles Lowndes of the local landowning Lowndes family [78]
Skinner Place –
Sloane Gardens, Sloane Square, Sloane Street, Sloane Terrace and Lower Sloane Street – after Hans Sloane, local landowner when this area was built up in the 18th century [79][80]
South Carriage Drive – after the carriage which formerly used this path [81][82]
Studio Place – as this are was home to many artists’ studios in the early 20th century [83]
Wellington Buildings –
Whittaker Street – after its 1830 builder John Whittaker [84][85]
Wilbraham Place – unknown [56]
William Mews and William Street – after William Lowndes of the local landowning Lowndes family [86][25]
Wilton Crescent Mews, Wilton Place, Wilton Row, Wilton Street and Wilton Terrace – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Eleanor Egerton was the wife of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Bloomsbury. The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of Bloomsbury viz. Euston Road to the north, Gray’s Inn Road to the east, New Oxford Street, High Holborn, Southampton Row and Theobald’s Road to the south and Tottenham Court Road to the west.

Adeline Place – after Adeline Marie Russell, Duchess of Bedford, wife of George Russell, 10th Duke of Bedford, local landowner[1]
Alfred Mews and Alfred Place – after Alfred Waddilove, son of John, who built this street in 1806[2][3]
Argyle Square, Argyll Street and Argyle Walk – named for Argyll in Scotland[4]
Bainbridge Street – after Henry Bainbridge, local resident in the 17th century[5][6]
Barbon Close – after 17th century property developer Nicholas Barbon[7][8]
Barter Street – after the Bloomsbury Market, which stood here in the 17th – 19th centuries[9][10]
Bayley Street – after Sir John Bayley, 1st Baronet, 18th – 19th century judge who lived nearby on Bedford Square[11][12]
Beaumont Place – after Joseph Beaumont, who built this street in 1791[13][14]
Bedford Avenue, Bedford Place, Bedford Square and Bedford Way – after local 18th century landowners the Russell family, earls/dukes of Bedford[15][16]
Belgrove Street – formerly Belgrave Street, thought to be for a Warwickshire locality of this name [17][18]
Bernard Street – after Sir Thomas Bernard, 3rd Baronet, 18th – 19th century social reformer who held several high level positions at the nearby Foundling Hospital[19][20]
Bidborough Street – after Bidborough in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[21][22]
Birkenhead Street – after Birkenhead in Cheshire; formerly Liverpool Street [17][23]
Bloomsbury Court, Bloomsbury Place, Bloomsbury Square, Bloomsbury Street and Bloomsbury Way – the name is first noted in 1201, when William de Blemond, a Norman landowner, acquired the land[24] The name Bloomsbury is a development from Blemondisberi – the bury, or manor, of Blemond.
Boswell Court and Boswell Street – after local 17th bricklayer Edward Boswell[25][26]
Brownlow Mews – after William Brownlow, local 17th century landowner (further to the south, hence Brownlow Street in Holborn); his daughter Elizabeth married into the Doughty family, who owned land in this area[27][28]
Brunswick Square – after the German city of Braunschweig (Brunswick), by connection with the reigning House of Hanover[29][20]
Burton Place and Burton Street – after the 18th century architect James Burton, who worked on the nearby Foundling Hospital and Bedford estate[30][22]
Bury Place – a shortening of ‘Bloomsbury’[30][31]
Byng Place – after George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington, father-in-law to local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford[32]
Capper Street – after the Capper farmer, tenant farmers on this land in the 17th – 18th centuries[33][34]
Cartwright Gardens – after John Cartwright, 19th century political reformer who lived here; it was originally Burton Crescent, after the architect James Burton[35][36]
Chenies Mews and Chenies Street – after local landowners the dukes of Bedford, also titled Barons Russell, of Chenies[37][38]
Cockpit Yard – site of a cock fighting yard in the 18th century[39][40]
Colonnade – this was formerly a Georgian-era colonnade of shops [41][42]
Compton Place –
Coptic Street – named in 1894 after a recent acquisition of Coptic manuscripts by the British Museum; before this it was Duke Street, after the dukes of Bedford[43][44]
Coram Street – after Thomas Coram, 18th century founder of the Foundling Hospital which was formerly near here[43][45][45]
Cosmo Place – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford[46][47][48]
Crestfield Street – unknown, formerly Chesterfield Street[17][23]
Cromer Street – formerly Lucas Street, which had gained notoriety due to the landlord of a local inn (the Lucas Arms) being involved with the Gordon Riots; it was changed to the neutral Cromer, for the town in Norfolk[49][50]
Dombey Street – named is 1936 after local resident Charles Dickens’s book Dombey and Son; it was formerly East Street, in relation to the nearby New North Street[51][52]
Doughty Mews and Doughty Street – after the Doughty family, local landowners in the 18th century[53][54]
Dukes Road – after the dukes of Bedford, local landowners[55][56]
Dyott Street – after either Simon Dyott, local resident in the 17th century[57] or Jane Dyott, granddaughter or local landowner Henry Bainbridge[6]
Emerald Court and Emerald Street – Green Street prior to 1885, changed to avoid confusion with numerous other streets of that name[58][59]
Endsleigh Gardens, Endsleigh Place and Endsleigh Street – after Endsleigh, a property in Tavistock, Devon owned by the dukes of Bedford[60][61]
Euston Road – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s[62][63]
Flaxman Terrace – after the John Flaxman, 18th–19th century sculptor who is buried at the nearby St Pancras Old Church[64][65]
Gage Street – unknown[66]
Galen Place – after Ancient Greek physician Galen, by connection with the Pharmaceutical Society whose examination hall formerly stood here[67][66]
Gilbert Place –
Gordon Square and Gordon Street – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford[68][69]
Gower Court, Gower Mews, Gower Place and Gower Street – after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford[70][71]
Grafton Way – after local landowners the dukes of Grafton[72][71]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[73][74]
Great James Street – after James Burgess, assistant to local landowners the Brownlow family[75]
Great Ormond Street, Ormond Close and Ormond Mews – thought to commemorate James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, prominent 17th century soldier[76][77]
Great Russell Street – see Russell Square
Grenville Street – after William Wyndham Grenville, 1st Baron Grenville, prominent 19th century politician[78][20][79]
Guilford Place and Guilford Street – after Prime Minister Lord North, 2nd Earl of Guildford, who was also President of the nearby Foundling Hospital from 1771 until his death[80][20]
Handel Street – after the 18th century composter George Frederick Handel, a benefactor of the nearby Foundling Hospital and organist at its chapel[81][44]
Harpur Mews and Harpur Street – after either local 18th century landowner Peter Harpur[82] or Sir William Harpur, founder of the Bedford School[83]
Harrison Street – after local 18th – 19th century landowners and brickmakers the Harrison family[84][85]
Hastings Street – after Hastings in Sussex, near to Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[22]
Heathcote Street – after Michael Heathcote, governor of the nearby Foundling Hospital in the early 19th century[86][20]
Henrietta Mews – named after Foundling Hospital vice-president (mid-19th century) Sir Stephen Gaselee’s wife Henrietta[87][20]
Herbrand Street – after local landowner Herbrand Arthur Russell, 11th Duke of Bedford[88][89]
High Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that the road led away from the river to higher ground.[90][91][92][93]
Hunter Street – after prominent 18th century surgeon John Hunter, by association with adjacent School of Medicine[94][95]
Huntley Street – after Cosmo George Gordon, 3rd Duke of Gordon, Marquess of Huntly grandfather of Lady Georgiana, wife of local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford[46][95]
John’s Mews and John Street – after local 18th century carpenter John Blagrave[94][75]
Judd Street – after Andrew Judd, who developed the local area via the Skinners’ Company in the 1570s[94][22]
Kenton Street – after the 18th century vintner Benjamin Kenton, benefactor of the nearby Foundling Hospital[96][20]
Keppel Street – after Elizabeth Keppel, wife of local landowner Francis Russell, Marquess of Tavistock[96][97]
King’s Mews – by association with Theobald’s Road, formerly King’s Way[98]
Kirk Street –
Lamb’s Conduit Street – named after William Lambe, in recognition of the £1,500 he gave for the rebuilding of the Holborn Conduit in 1564.[99] (According to The London Encyclopaedia, “The conduit was an Elizabethan dam made in one of the tributaries of the Fleet River and restored in 1577 by William Lamb, who also provided 120 pails for poor women”)[100]
Lamp Office Court –
Lansdowne Terrace – after William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne, Prime Minister 1782–83[101][20]
Leigh Street – after Leigh in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[21][22]
Long Yard – simply a descriptive name for this former stable yard[102]
Loxham Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s[103]
Lytton Court –
Mabledon Place – after Mabledone in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[21][22]
Malet Place and Malet Street – after Sir Edward Baldwin Malet, 4th Baronet, husband of Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of local landowner Francis Russell, 9th Duke of Bedford[104][105]
Marchmont Street – after Hugh Hume-Campbell, 3rd Earl of Marchmont, governor of the nearby Foundling Hospital[106][20]
Mecklenburgh Place, Mecklenburgh Square and Mecklenburgh Street – after Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife George III, reigning monarch when the square was built[107][20]
Midhope Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s[103]
Millman Mews, Millman Place and Millman Street – after local 17th century landowner William Millman[108][109]
Montague Place and Montague Street – after Montagu House, built in the 1670 for Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu, which was formerly on the site of the British Museum[110][111]
Mortimer Market – after the market formerly on this site, founded by Hans Winthrop Mortimer in 1768[112][113]
Morwell Street – after Morwell in Devon, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford held land[114][113]
Museum Street – after the British Museum adjacent[115][116]
New North Street – as it leads northwards from Red Lions Square, ‘New’ so as to contract with Old North Street which continues southwards[117][118]
North Crescent and South Crescent – simply description of their shape [119]
Northington Street – after Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, Lord Chancellor 1761–66[120][121]
North Mews – after Lord North, Prime Minister[122]
Old Gloucester Street – after Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, son of Queen Anne; the street was formerly just ‘Gloucester Street’ until 1873[123][124]
Orde Hall Street – after Orde Hall, 19th century chairman representing this area at the Metropolitan Board of Works[125][126]
Pied Bull Court and Pied Bull Yard –
Powis Place – former site of Powis House, built for William Herbert, 2nd Marquess of Powis, a prominent 17th – 18th century Jacobite[127][128]
Queen Anne’s Walk and Queen Square and Queen Square Place – after Queen Anne, reigning monarch when the square was laid out[129][130]
Queen’s Yard –
Regent Square – after the Prince Regent, later George IV; the square dates to after the Regency ended, however the name has already been chosen years before[131][132]
Richbell Place – after its 18th century builder, John Richbell[133][134]
Ridgmount Gardens, Ridgmount Place and Ridgmount Street – after Ridgmont, Bedfordshire, where the dukes of Bedford also owned land[133][135]
Roger Street – renamed in 1937 from ‘Henry Street’, after local landowner Henry Doughty[136][137]
Rossetti Court –
Rugby Street – after Rugby School; its founder Lawrence Sheriff gave land here in 1567 as an endowment[138][139]
Russell Square and Great Russell Street – after local landowner the Russells, Dukes of Bedford[140][139]
St Chad’s Street – after the nearby St Chad’s well, reputed to be a medieval holy well; St Chad was a 7th-century bishop[141][142]
St Giles Circus, St Giles High Street and St Giles Passage – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th-century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction.[143][144]
St Peter’s Court –
Sandwich Street – after Sandwich in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[21][22]
Seaford Street – thought to be named for Seaford in Sussex[145]
Shropshire Place –
Sicilian Avenue – this Italianate arch is built from Sicilian marble[146][147]
Sidmouth Mews and Sidmouth Street – either for Sidmouth in Devon, then a fashionable resort town[148] or Prime Minister Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth[149]
Southampton Place and Southampton Row – Southampton House, home of the earls of Southampton, formerly stood here in the 16th century[150][151]
South Crescent Mews –
Speedy Place – after the Speedy family, landlords of the former nearby pub the Golden Boot[152][50]
Stedham Place –
Store Street – unknown[153]
Streatham Street – after Streatham, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford also owned property[154][155]
Tankerton Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s[103]
Tavistock Place and Tavistock Square – after Tavistock, Devon, where the dukes of Bedford owned property[60][156]
Taviton Street – after Taviton, Devon, where the dukes of Bedford owned property[60][156]
Thanet Street – after Thanet in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd[21][22]
Theobald’s Road – this road formerly formed part of a route used by Stuart monarchs to their hunting grounds at Theobalds House, Hertfordshire[157][158]
Thornhaugh Mews and Thornhaugh Street – after local landowners the dukes of Bedford, also titled Barons Russell of Thornhaugh[159][158]
Tonbridge Street and Tonbridge Walk – after Tonbridge in Kent, home town of Andrew Judd, local landowner of the 16th century[94][22]
Torrington Place and Torrington Square – after George Byng, 4th Viscount Torrington, father-in-law to local landowner John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford[160][161]
Tottenham Court Road, Tottenham Mews and Tottenham Street – after the former manor of Tottenham (Tottenhall) which stood here from the 13th century, possibly from one local William de Tottenall, or else meaning ‘Tota’s Hall’. The name later became confused with the unconnected Tottenham, Middlesex[160][162][161]
United Alley – ‘
University Street – due to its location near London University[163][164]
Vernon Place – after Elizabeth Wriothesley, Countess of Southampton, (née Vernon), ancestor to Rachel Russell, Lady Russell, wife of William Russell, Lord Russell of the local landowning Russell family[165][166]
Wakefield Mews and Wakefield Street – after a former local pub, the Pindar of Wakefield[167][85]
Westking Place –
Whidborne Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s[103]
Willoughby Street – after GP Willoughy, mayor of Holborn Borough in the 1910s[168]
Woburn Place, Woburn Square, Woburn Walk and Upper Woburn Place – after Woburn Abbey, principal seat of local landowners the dukes of Bedford[169][170]
Woolf Mews – presumably after the author and local resident Virginia Woolf

Chinatown has no officially defined size, but they have been commonly considered to be approximated to encompasses Gerrard St, the bottom half of Wardour St, Rupert St and Rupert Court, a section of Shaftesbury Avenue and Lisle St, Macclesfield Street and Newport Place, Newport Court and Little Newport Street.[6]

Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[7][8][9] [10]
Coventry Street – after Henry Coventry, Secretary of State to Charles II, who lived near here in Shaver’s Hall[11] [12]
Cranbourn Street – built in the 1670s and named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (or Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset[13][14]
Dansey Place – unknown; formerly named George Yard, after a pub adjacent called the George and Dragon [15][16]
Gerrard Place and Gerrard Street – after Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, who owned this land when the street as built in the 1680s; the form ‘Gerrard’ developed in the 19th century[17][18]
Great Windmill Street – after a windmill that formerly stood near here in Ham Yard in the 16th-17th century; the ‘great’ prefix was to distinguish it from Little Windmill Street, now Lexington Street[19][20]
Horse and Dolphin Yard – after the Horse and Dolphin inn which stood here in the 17th – 19th centuries[21][22]
Leicester Court, Leicester Place, Leicester Square and Leicester Street – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester; Leicester Court was formerly Ryder Court, after local leaseholder Richard Ryder – it was renamed in 1936[23][24][25]
Lisle Street – after Philip, Viscount Lisle, who succeeded to the earldom of Leicester in 1677[26][27]
Macclesfield Street – after Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, local landowner in the 17th century[28][29]
Newport Court, Newport Place and Little Newport Street – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on this street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road, Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today[30][31]
Rupert Court and Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I; he was First Lord of the Admiralty when this street was built in 1676[32][33]
Shaftesbury Avenue – after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist[34][35]
Wardour Street – named after local 17th century landowners the Wardour family, and formerly called Colman Hedge Lane/Close after a nearby field; the section south of Brewer Street was formerly Prince Street prior to 1878, in parallel with Rupert Street

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the City of London.

Abchurch Lane and Abchurch Yard – after the adjacent St Mary Abchurch[1][2][3]
Adam’s Court – thought to be for Sir Thomas Adams, 1st Baronet, master of the Worshipful Company of Drapers and later Lord Mayor of London[4]
Addle Hill – from an Old English word for prince (athling)[5][6][7]
Addle Street – from an Old English word for filth/dung, presumably descriptive,[5] though also may be the same etymology as Addle Hill above[7]
Alban Highwalk and St Albans Court – after the adjacent St Alban, Wood Street church, of which only the tower now remains[8]
Albion Place (off London Wall)
Albion Way
Aldermanbury and Aldermanbury Square – the site of a burgh (enclosed settlement) of a Saxon-era alderman[9][10][11]
Alderman’s Walk – formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century; it was changed when he became an alderman[9][11]
Aldersgate Court and Aldersgate Street – The name Aldersgate is first recorded around 1000 in the form Ealdredesgate, i.e. “gate associated with a man named Ealdrad”. The gate, constructed by the Romans in the 2nd or 3rd centuries when London Wall was constructed, probably acquired its name in the late Saxon period[12]
Aldgate, Aldgate Avenue and Aldgate High Street – thought to be an alteration of ‘Old Gate’; others think it stems from ‘Ale Gate’ (after a local inn) or ‘All Gate’ (as it was open to all)[13][14][15][16][17][18]
Allhallows Lane – after the church of All-Hallows-the-Great and Less, both destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666; the Great was rebuilt by Christopher Wren, but was demolished in 1894[19][20]
Amen Corner and Amen Court – by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral[21][22]
America Square – laid out in 1767-70 by George Dance the Younger and named in honour of the American colonies[23][22]
Andrewes Highwalk – presumably after Lancelot Andrewes, rector of the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church
Angel Court – named after a long demolished inn of this name[24][25]
Angel Lane
Angel Street – after a demolished inn of this name; formerly Angle Alley[24][25]
Apothecary Street – after the nearby Worshipful Society of Apothecaries[24][26]
Appold Stree
The Arcade (Liverpool Street) – presumably descriptive
Arthur Street – unknown[27]
Artillery Lane – this formerly led to the Tasel Close Artillery Yard, which stood here in the 17th–18th centuries[28][27]
Artizan Street
Ashentree Court – after the ashen trees formerly located here at the Whitefriars’ monastery[29]
Athene Place
Austin Friars and Austin Friars Passage and Austin Friars Square – after Austin Friars, a medieval friary which stood here in the Medieval period[28][30]
Ave Maria Lane – after the Hail Mary (Ave Maria), by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral[21][30]
The Avenue (Cutlers Gardens) – presumably descriptive
Back Alley – presumably descriptive
Back Passage – presumably descriptive
Bakers Hall Court – after the nearby hall of the Worshipful Company of Bakers[31]
Ball Court
Baltic Street West – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Baltic refers to the Baltic softwood trade[32][33]
Barbon Alley
Barley Mow Passage – after a former inn here of this name, possibly by reference to alcohol, or else a corruption of the nearby St Bartholomew’s church and hospital[34]
Barnard’s Inn – named after Lionel Barnard, owner of a town house (or ‘inn’) here in the mid-15th century[35]
Bartholomew Close and Bartholomew Place – after St Bartholomew’s Priory, which stood here and is remembered in the names of the local hospital and two churches[36][37]
Bartholomew Lane – after the former St Bartholomew-by-the-Exchange church, demolished in 1840[36][38][39]
Bartlett Court, Bartlett Street and Bartletts Passage – after Thomas Bartlett, court printer to Edward VI, who owned property here[40][41]
Basinghall Avenue and Basinghall Street – thought to be after land owned here by the people of Basa or Basing (in Old Basing, Hampshire), or possibly after a mansion house of the Bassing (or Basing) family, who were prominent in the City beginning in the 13th century[36][42][43][41]
Bassishaw Highwalk – after the Bassishaw ward in which it’s located[41]
Bastion Highwalk – presumably after the adjacent Roman bastion ruins
Bear Alley – thought to be after a former inn of this name[44][45]
Beech Gardens and Beech Street – after beech trees which formerly stood here; the name is an old one, recorded as ‘Bechestrete’ in the 13th century[46][47]
Beehive Passage – after a former tavern here of this name[47]
Bengal Court – presumably after the former British colony of Bengal
Bell Court
Bell Inn Yard – after a former inn of this name[48][49]
Bell Wharf Lane – unknown, possibly after a former tavern of this name; formerly Emperor’s Head Lane, after an inn here[50][49]
Ben Jonson Place – after Ben Jonson, 17th century playwright and poet
Bennet’s Hill – after the adjacent St Benet’s church[51]
Bevis Marks – corruption of ‘Bury Marks’, after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s; mark is thought to note a boundary here[52][53][54]
Billiter Court and Billiter Street – after former ‘belzeter’ (bell foundry) located here[55][56][57]
Birchin Lane – unknown, though suggested to come from the Old English ‘beord-ceorfere’ (bear carver i.e. a barbers); it has had several variation on this name in the past, including Berchervere, Berchenes and Birchen[55][54][58]
Bishop’s Court
Bishopsgate, Bishopsgate Arcade and Bishopsgate Churchyard – after one of the City gates that formerly stood here, thought to commemorate Saint Earconwald, Bishop of London in the 7th century[59][60]
Blackfriars Bridge, Blackfriars Court, Blackfriars Lane, Blackfriars Passage and Blackfriars Underpass – after the former Dominican (or Black friars, after their robes) friary that stood here 1276–1538[61][62]
Blomfield Street – after Charles James Blomfield, Bishop of London 1828–1856[63][64]
Bloomberg Arcade – after its owners/developers Bloomberg L.P.
Bolt Court – thought to be after a former tavern called the Bolt-in-Tun[65][66]
Bond Court – after a 17th-century property developer of this name[67][68]
Booth Lane
Botolph Alley and Botolph Lane – after the St Botolph Billingsgate church which stood near here, destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666[67][38][69]
Bouverie Street – after William Bouverie, 1st Earl of Radnor[70][71]
Bow Churchyard and Bow Lane – after the adjacent St Mary-le-Bow church; it was formerly known as Hosier Lane (after the local stocking making trade), and prior to that Cordewanere Street (meaning ‘leather-workers’)[72][2][71]
Brabant Court – thought to be after the Dutch/Belgian province of this name, though possibly a corruption of a personal name (prior to the 18th century it was known as Braben Court, and before that Brovens Court)[73]
Brackley Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here[73][74]
Braidwood Passage – presumably after 19th century fireman James Braidwood
Brandon Mews
Bread Street – after the bakery trade that formerly took place here[75][76][77]
Bream’s Buildings – thought to be named for its 18th century builder[77]
Breton Highwalk – presumably after the 16th–17th century poet Nicholas Breton
Brewer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Brewers hall
Brick Court – as this was home to the first set of brick buildings in the area[78]
Bride Court, Bride Lane, St Bride’s Avenue, St Bride’s Passage and St Bride Street – after the adjacent St Bride’s Church[79][38][78]
Bridewell Place – after the adjacent St Bride’s Church and a well that was formerly located here in the early Middle Ages; the name was later given to Bridewell Palace (demolished in the 1860s[80][78]
Bridgewater Highwalk, Bridgewater Square and Bridgewater Street – after the Earls of Bridgewater, also called the Viscounts Brackley, who owned a house near here[73][74]
Britannic Highwalk
Broadgate and Broadgate Circle – developed in the late 1980s, presumably named for the former Broad Street station on this site and the adjacent Bishopsgate
Broad Lane, Broad Street Avenue, New Broad Street and Old Broad Street – simply a descriptive name, dating to the early Middle Ages; the northern-most section was formerly ‘New Broad Street’; however, this has now switched onto an adjacent sidestreet[81][82][83]
Broken Wharf – this wharf fell into disrepair owing to a property dispute in the 14th century[84][85]
Brown’s Buildings
Brushfield Street – after Thomas Brushfield, Victorian-era representative for this area at the Metropolitan Board of Works; the western-most section, here forming the boundary with Tower Hamlets, was formerly called Union Street[86][87]
Bucklersbury and Bucklersbury Passage – after the Buckerel/Bucherel family who owned land here in the 1100s[86][88][89]
Budge Row – formerly home to the drapery trade; a ‘budge/boge’ was a type of lamb’s wool[90][91][89]
Bull’s Head Passage – thought to be after an inn or shop of this name[92][89]
Bunyan Court – after the author John Bunyan, who attended the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate church
Burgon Street – after Dean Burgon of St Paul’s Cathedral; prior to 1885 it was called New Street[93]
Bury Court and Bury Street – after a former house on this site given to Bury St Edmunds Abbey in the 1100s[94][95][54]
Bush Lane – thought to be after a former inn of this name[94][96][97]
Byward Street – after the adjacent Byward Tower of the Tower of London[98][97]
Camomile Street – after the camomile formerly grown here for medicine[99][100]
Canon Alley – presumably in reference to the adjacent St Paul’s Cathedral
Cannon Street – a contraction of the 14th century ‘Candlewick Street’, meaning a street where candle-makers were based[101][102]
Capel Court – after William Capel, Lord Mayor of London in the early 16th century[103]
Carlisle Avenue – unknown[104]
Carmelite Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I[105][106]
Carter Court and Carter Lane – after the cartering trade that formerly took place here,[107][108] or possibly also after someone with this name[109]
Carthusian Street – after the Carthusian monks who lived near here in the Middle Ages[110][111]
Castle Baynard Street – after Castle Baynard which formerly stood here[107]
Castle Court – after a former inn of this name[107]
Catherine Wheel Alley – after a former inn of this name, which was named for the Catherine wheel on the coat of arms of the Worshipful Company of Turners[112][113]
Cavendish Court – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s[112][114]
Chancery Lane – the former site of Edward III’s office of the Master of the Rolls of Chancery[115][116][117]
Change Alley – after the nearby Royal Exchange[115][118]
Charterhouse Square and Charterhouse Street – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371[119][120]
Cheapside and Cheapside Passage – from ‘chepe’, an Old English word meaning ‘market’; this was the western end of a market that stretched over the Eastcheap[121][122][120]
Cheshire Court – after the adjacent Ye Olde Cheshire Cheese pub[123]
Chiswell Street – either for old term meaning ‘stony/gravelly earth’,[124] or a corruption of ‘Choice Well’, denoting a source of clean water[54]
Church Cloisters – after the adjacent St Mary-at-Hill church; Church Passage till 1938[125]
Church Court – after the adjacent Temple Church
Church Entry – after the former St Ann Blackfriars church which burned down in the 1666 fire[126][62]
Circus Place – after the adjacent Finsbury Circus[127]
Clements Lane and St Clement’s Court – after the adjacent St Clement’s, Eastcheap church[38][128]
Clerk’s Place
Clifford’s Inn Passage – after an inn (townhouse) given to Robert de Clifford, 1st Baron de Clifford by Edward II[129][130]
Cloak Lane – unknown, though possibly from ‘cloaca’, an old word for a sewer; prior to the mid-17th century it was Horseshoebridge Street, after a bridge that stood here over the Walbrook[129][131]
Cloth Court, Cloth Fair and Cloth Street – after a long-running cloth fair that was formerly held here[129][132]
Clothier Street – after the former clothes market that operated here[129][132]
Cobb’s Court
Cock Hill – unknown, possibly from an old inn of this name[133]
Cock Lane – thought to be after either cock rearing or cock fighting that formerly occurred here[134][135][133]
Coleman Street and Coleman Street Buildings – possibly after a church of this name or a personal name,[136][137] or literally after the coalmen who formerly lived in this area in the Middle Ages[138]
College Hill, College Street and Little College Lane – after the adjacent St Michael Paternoster Royal, which was created as a collegiate church by Richard Whittington in 1419; College Street was formerly Paternoster Street (meaning rosary makers]] and College Hill was Royal Street (a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from)[139][140][141]
Compter Passage – presumably after the former Wood Street Compter
Cooper’s Row – after an 18th-century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Woodruffe Lane, also thought to be after a property owner[142][143]
Copthall Avenue, Copthall Buildings and Copthall Close – after a former ‘copt hall’ (crested hall) that stood here[144][143]
Corbet Court – after a local 17th century property developer[144]
Cornhill – thought to be after the corn formerly grown or sold here[144][145][146]
Cousin Lane – after either Joanna or William Cousin, the first a local landowner, the latter a 14th-century sheriff[147][148][149]
Cowper’s Court – after the Cowper family, local landowners[150]
Crane Court – formerly Two Crane Court, possibly after a coat of arms of one of the local landowning families[150]
Creechurch Lane and Creechurch Place – after the former Holy Trinity Priory, Aldgate near here; it was also named Christ Church, later corrupted to ‘Creechurch’, and later also given to St Katharine Cree church[151][152]
Creed Court and Creed Lane – by association with the nearby St Paul’s Cathedral[21][152]
Crescent – thought to be first crescent-shaped street in London[127]
Cripplegate Street – after the former Cripplegate that stood here, referring either to a crepel (Latin for ‘covered way’) or the association with the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate church (St Giles is the patron saint of cripples)[151][153]
Cromwell Highwalk and Cromwell Place – presumably after Oliver Cromwell, who was married in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church in 1620
Crosby Square – after Crosby House, built for Sir John Crosby, 15th century merchant and politician[154][155]
Cross Keys Square – after a house or inn called Cross Keys that stood here in Tudor times[154][155]
Cross Lane – descriptive; it was formerly Fowle Lane (literally ‘foul’)[154][156][155]
Crosswall – descriptive, as it crosses the boundary of the city wall[154][157]
Crown Court
Crown Office Row – after the Clerks of the Crown Office formerly located here[158]
Crutched Friars – after the Crutched Friars, a religious order who had a friary here in the early Middle Ages which was dissolved by Henry VIII[159][160][158]
Cullum Street – after either Sir John Cullum, 17th century sheriff who owned land here,[159] or Thomas Cullum[161]
Cunard Place – after the Cunard Line headquarters, formerly located here[161]
Cursitor Street – after the Cursitors’ office, established here in the 16th century[162][161]
Custom House Walk – after the adjacent Custom House
Cutler Street and Cutlers Gardens Arcade – after the Worshipful Company of Cutlers, who owned land here[162][163]
Dark House Walk – after a former inn here called the Darkhouse; it was formerly Dark House Lane, and prior to that Dark Lane[164]
Dean’s Court – after the Dean of St Paul’s[165][166]
Defoe Place – after the author Daniel Defoe
Devonshire Row and Devonshire Square – after the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, who owed a house near here in the 1600s[167][168]
Distaff Lane – formerly Little Distaff Lane, as it lay off the main Distaff Lane (now absorbed into Cannon Street); in Medieval times the area was home to a distaff industry[169][170][171]
Doby Court – thought to be after a local landowner; prior to 1800 called Maidenhead Court[169]
Dorset Buildings and Dorset Rise – Salisbury Court, London home of the bishops of Salisbury, formerly stood near here; after the Dissolution of the Monasteries it passed to Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset[172][173]
Dowgate Hill – after a former watergate leading to the Thames here; it was formerly Duuegate, Old English for ‘dove’ (possibly a personal name), or possibly simply from the word ‘down'[174][175][176]
Drapers Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Drapers building[177][178]
Dukes Place – after Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, who inherited a house near here from his uncle Thomas Audley, who had gained the land following the Dissolution of the Monasteries[179][180]
Dunster Court – corruption of St Dunstan’s Court, as it lay in the parish of St Dunstan-in-the-East[179]
Dyer’s Buildings – after almshouses owned by the Worshipful Company of Dyers formerly located here[181]
Eastcheap – as it was the eastern end of the former Cheapside market[182][181]
East Harding Street and West Harding Street – after local 16th century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for the upkeep of widows[183][184]
East Passage – presumably descriptive
East Poultry Avenue and West Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market[185]
Eldon Street – after John Scott, 1st Earl of Eldon, Lord Chancellor in the early 19th century, or a tavern named after him[186][187]
Elm Court – after the elm trees in the Temple Gardens[188][189]
Essex Court – presumably after the earls of Essex, who owned a townhouse near here (hence the nearby Essex Street)[190][191]
Exchange Arcade, Exchange Place and Exchange Square
Falcon Court – after a former inn or shop of this name[192][193]
Falcon Highwalk
Fann Street – thought to be named after a local property owner or tradesman of this name[194][195]
Farringdon Street – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[196][197][198]
Fen Court, Fenchurch Avenue, Fenchurch Buildings, Fenchurch Place and Fenchurch Street – after a fen which was formerly located near here, and possibly the former St Gabriel Fenchurch[196][199][200]
Fetter Lane and New Fetter Lane – formerly Fewter Lane, a Medieval term for an idler,[196][201] stemming originally from the Old French ‘faitour’ (lawyer)[202]
Finch Lane – after Robert Fink (some sources: Aelfwin Finnk), who paid for the rebuilding of the former St Benet Fink Church in the 13th century; the church was destroyed in the 1666 Fire, and its replacement demolished in the 1840s[203][204]
Finsbury Avenue, Finsbury Avenue Square, Finsbury Circus – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn[203][197][205]
Fish Street Hill, Fish Wharf and Old Fish Street Hill – after the former local fish trade here, centred on Billingsgate Fish Market[206][207][208]
Fishmongers Hall Wharf – after the adjacent Fishmongers’ Hall[203]
Fleet Place, Fleet Street and Old Fleet Lane – after the now covered river Fleet which flowed near here[209][210][211]
Fore Street and Fore Street Avenue – named after its location in front of the City walls[212][213][214]
Fort Street – after the former armoury and artillery grounds located near here[212]
Foster Lane – corruption of Vedast, after the adjacent St Vedast Church[212][215][181]
Founders’ Court – after the Worshipful Company of Founders, who were formerly based here[216][217]
Fountain Court – after the 17th century fountain located here[217]
Frederick’s Place – after John Frederick, Lord Mayor of London in 1661[218][217]
French Ordinary Court – former site of an ‘ordinary’ (cheap eating place) for the local French community in the 17th century[218][219]
Friar Street – after the former Dominican friary that stood here 1276–1538[218][220]
Friday Street – after the former local fish trade here, with reference to the popularity of fish on this day owing to the Catholic Friday Fast; the street formerly extended all the way to Cheapside[221][222][220]
Frobisher Crescent – after the explorer Martin Frobisher, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate
Fruiterers Passage – after the Worshipful Company of Fruiterers, formerly based here[223]
Furnival Street – after the nearby Furnival’s Inn, owned by Sir Richard Furnival in the late 1500s[224][225]
Fye Foot Lane – corruption of ‘five foot’, after its original breadth; formerly Finamour Lane, after an individual with this surname[226][227]
Garden Court – after the adjacent Temple Gardens[228]
Gardner’s Lane – unknown, though thought to be after a local property owner; formerly called Dunghill Lane in the 18th century[229][228]
Garlick Hill – as it led to the former Garlick Hythe, a wharf where garlic was unloaded from ships[230][228]
George Yard – after the adjacent George and Vulture pub,[231] or another pub of this name formerly located here[232]
Giltspur Street – thought to be the former location of a spurriers[233][234][235]
Gloucester Court
Godliman Street – thought to be after Godalming, Surrey, a family bearing this name, or the selling of godalmins (a type of skin/leather); it was formerly Paul’s Chain, after the chain placed here to prevent access to St Paul’s churchyard[236][237]
Golden Lane – formerly Goldynglane, thought to be after a local property owner of the name Golding/Golda[236][237]
Goldsmith Street – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths[238][239]
Goodman’s Court and Goodman’s Yard – thought to be after the Goodman family, local farmers in the 16th century[238][240]
Gophir Lane – formerly Gofaire Lane, thought to be for Elias Gofaire, 14th century property owner[241][242]
Goring Street – unknown; prior to 1885 known as Castle Court, after a former inn[241]
Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called ‘Goswelle’ or ‘Goderell’ which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk,[243] whilst others state it derives from “God’s Well”, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship,[244] and others a ‘Gode Well’ formerly located here[245]
Gough Square – after Richard Gough, wool merchant, local landowners in the early 1700s[241][245]
Gracechurch Street – formerly Garscherch Street, Grass Church Street and Gracious Street, presumably after a local church (mostly likely St Benet Gracechurch and/or grassy area[246][247][248]
Grand Avenue – presumably descriptive[249]
Grant’s Quay Wharf
Gravel Lane – descriptive, after its gravelly texture[250][251]
Great Bell Alley – formerly just Bell Alley, it was named for a former inn[250][252]
Great Eastern Walk (Liverpool Street station) – presumably descriptive, or after the Great Eastern Railway company
Great New Street, Little New Street, Middle New Street, New Street Court, New Street Square – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply as they were then new[253][184]
Great St Helen’s and St Helen’s Place – after the adjacent St Helen’s Church, Bishopsgate and former priory here of the same name[254][255]
Great St Thomas Apostle – after the St Thomas the Apostle church, destroyed in the Great Fire[254][255]
Great Swan Alley – after a former inn here called The White Swan[256][257]
Great Tower Street – after the adjacent Tower of London[256][257]
Great Trinity Lane, Little Trinity Lane and Trinity Lane – after the former Holy Trinity the Less church, demolished 1871[256][257]
Great Winchester Street – following the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the nearby Austin Friars was acquired by Sir William Powlet, Lord Treasurer; his son Lord Winchester renamed it for himself[256]
Green Arbour Court – thought to be from a 17th-century inn[256]
The Green Yard
Gresham Street – after Thomas Gresham, merchant and founder the Royal Exchange; the western part of this street was formerly known as Lad Lane, and the eastern part Cat Eaton Street (named literally after the cats here); they were amalgamated in 1845[258][259][260]
Greyfriars Passage – after the Franciscan order, also known as the Grey friars, who owned land here in the Middle Ages[261][262]
Greystoke Place – after a local 18th century property owner of this name; prior to this it was Black Raven Alley, after a local inn[263][262]
Grocer’s Hall Court and Grocer’s Hall Gardens – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Grocers[262]
Groveland Court
Guildhall Buildings and Guildhall Yard – after the adjacent Guildhall[264]
Guinness Court
Gunpowder Square
Gutter Lane – corruption of Guthrun/Godrun, thought to be after an early Danish landowner[265][266]
Half Moon Court – after a former inn of this name[267][266]
Hammett Street – after its 18th century builder Benjamin Hammett, also Lord Mayor of London in 1797[268]
Hanging Sword Alley – thought to be after a former inn, shop or fencing school of this name[267][269]
Hanseatic Walk – presumably in reference to Hanseatic League
Hare Place – after Hare House which formerly stood here; formerly Ram Alley, a noted criminal area, prompting the name change[257]
Harp Alley – thought to be after a former 17th century inn of this name[270][271]
Harp Lane – after the Harp brewhouse which formerly stood here[270][50][271]
Harrow Place – thought to be named for a harrow-making shop formerly located here after a former inn of this name[272][273]
Hart Street – unknown, formerly Herthstrete and Hertstrete, possibly after the hearthstone trade here[274][234][273]
Hartshorn Alley – after the Hart’s Horn inn which formerly stood here[274][275]
Haydon Street and Haydon Walk – after John Heydon, Master of the Ordnance 1627-42, who lived near here[276][275]
Hayne Street – after Haynes timber merchants and carpenters, who owned a shop here after a former inn of this name[276][277]
Hen and Chicken Court – after a former inn(s) here of this name[278]
Heneage Lane and Heneage Place – after Thomas Heneage, who acquired a house here after the dissolution of the nearby abbey[279][54]
High Holborn, Holborn, Holborn Circus and Holborn Viaduct – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that rode led away from the river to higher ground. ‘Circus’ is a British term for a road junction, and ‘viaduct’ is a self-explanatory term.[280][281][282]
High Timber Street – after a former timber hythe (wharf), recorded here from the late 13th century[283][284][285]
Hind Court
Hogarth Court – the artist William Hogarth formerly lodged here at a local tavern[286][287]
Honey Lane – after honey that was formerly sold here as art of the Cheapside market[288][289][290]
Hood Court
Hope Square
Hosier Lane – after the former hosiery trade based here[291][292][293]
Houndsditch – generally thought to be literally after a local ditch where dead dogs were dumped;[294] however, others think it may refer to a nearby kennels[291][295][296]
Huggin Court and Huggin Hill – formerly Hoggen Lane, as hogs were kept here[297][290][296]
Hutton Street
Idol Lane – formerly Idle Lane, it may be a personal name or denote local idlers[298][299]
India Street – after the former warehouses here of the East India Company; prior to 1913 it was George Street[298][300]
Inner Temple Lane – after the adjacent Inner Temple[301]
Ireland Yard – after haberdasher William Ireland, who owned a house here in the 1500s[302][303]
Ironmonger Lane – an ancient name, after the former ironmongery trade here[302][304][303]
Jewry Street – after the former Jewish community which was based here; formerly Poor Jewry Street[305][306][307][308]
John Carpenter Street – after John Carpenter, Town Clerk of London in the mid 15th century[305][309]
John Milton Passage – after the author John Milton
John Trundle Highwalk – after John Trundle, 16th–17th century author and book seller
John Wesley Highwalk – after John Wesley, founder of Methodism
Johnsons Court – after a local 16th century property owning family of this name; the connection with Samuel Johnson is coincidental[282][309]
Keats Place
Kennett Wharf Lane – after its late 18th century owner[310]
Kinghorn Street – formerly King Street, renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with many other streets of this name[307][311]
Kingscote Street – formerly King Edward Street (for Edward VI), renamed in 1885 to avoid confusion with the street of this name off Newgate Street[307][311]
King Street – built after the Great Fire and named for Charles II[312][313]
King Edward Street – named for Edward VI, who turned the adjacent Greyfriars monastery into a hospital; it was formerly known as Stinking Lane[307][314][311]
King William Street – named for William IV, reigning monarch when the street was built in 1829-35[315][314][313]
King’s Arms Yard – named after a former inn of this name[307][313]
King’s Bench Walk – named for the adjacent housing for lawyers of the King’s Bench[307][316]
Knightrider Court and Knightrider Street – thought to be literally a street where knights used to ride[317][318][319]
Lakeside Terrace – descriptive
Lambert Jones Mews – after Lambert Jones, Victorian-era councilman
Lambeth Hill – corruption of Lambert/Lambart, local property owner[320][321][322]
Langthorn Court – named after a former property owner of this name[323]
Lauderdale Place – named for the Earls of Lauderdale, who owned a house here[324]
Laurence Pountney Hill and Laurence Pountney Lane – after the former St Laurence Pountney church, built by Sir John de Pulteney but destroyed in the Great Fire[325][326][327]
Lawrence Lane – after the nearby St Lawrence Jewry church[328][215][329]
Leadenhall Market, Leadenhall Place and Leadenhall Street – after the Leaden Hall, a house owned by Sir Hugh Neville in the 14th century[330][140][331]
Lime Street – Medieval name denoting a place of lime kilns[332][333][334]
Limeburner Lane – after the lime burning trade formerly located here[304]
Lindsey Street – unknown[334]
Little Britain – thought to be after Robert le Bretoun, 13th century local landowner, probably from Brittany[332][335][336]
Little Somerset Street
Liverpool Street – built in 1829 and named for Robert Jenkinson, 2nd Earl of Liverpool, Prime Minister 1812-27[337][338]
Lloyd’s Avenue – as the headquarters of the Lloyd’s Register (named for Lloyd’s Coffee House) were located here[339]
Lombard Court and Lombard Lane – from Lombardy, as this area was home to a community from there; the name was altered from Lombard Street to avoid confusion with the other street of this name[340][341]
Lombard Street – from the wool merchants from Lombardy who traded and lent money here from the 13th century onwards[340][342][341]
London Bridge – self-explanatory; for centuries this was the only bridge crossing the Thames[343]
London Street and New London Street – named after local 18th century property owner John London, not the city; the ‘New’ section was a later extension[327][343]
London Wall – after the city wall which formerly ran along this route (though there are still some ruins visible)[344][345][343]
Long Lane – a descriptive name[346][343]
Lothbury – meaning ‘burgh’ of Lotha/Hlothere, a 7th-century name[347][88][348]
Lovat Street – thought to be either a corruption of Lucas Lane, after a local landowner, or for Lord Lovat, local politician; it was formerly ‘Love Lane’, probably a euphemism for prostitution, and changed to avoid confusion with the other city lane of this name[349][348]
Love Lane – unknown, but possible with reference to the prostitution that occurred here in the 16th century; it was formerly Roper Lane, probably after the rope making trade, but possibly after a person with this surname[349][350][348]
Lower Thames Street and Upper Thames Street – thought to mark the bank of the Thames in Roman/Saxon times[351][352][348]
Ludgate Broadway, Ludgate Circus, Ludgate Hill and Ludgate Square – the former city gate of this name that formerly stood here, thought to an Old English term for ‘postern-gate’[349][353][354]
Mac’s Place
Magpie Alley – after a former inn here of this name[339][355]
Mansell Street – named after either local landowner Sir William Leman, 2nd Baronet for his wife Mary Mansell[356] or Mansel Leman, also a local property owner in the 17th century[357]
Mansion House Place and Mansion House Street – after the adjacent Mansion House[358]
Mark Lane – unknown, though possibly a corruption of ‘Martha’; formerly known as Martlane and Marke Lane[359][360][361]
Martin Lane – after the former St Martin Orgar church, demolished (save for the tower) in 1820[362][326][363][364]
Mason’s Avenue – after the Worshipful Company of Masons, whose headquarters formerly stood here[362]
Middle Street – descriptive[365]
Middlesex Passage – formerly Middlesex Court, thought to be after Middlesex House which formerly stood here[366]
Middlesex Street (Petticoat Lane) and Petticoat Square – as this street forms the boundary of the City with the county of Middlesex, with the alternative name Petticoat stemming from the clothes market formerly held here; prior to 1602 it was known as Hog Lane after the animal[366][367][365]
Middle Temple Lane – after the adjacent Middle Temple[366][365]
Milk Street – after the milk and dairy trade that formerly occurred here in connection with the nearby Cheapside market[368][369][370]
Millennium Bridge – as it was built to commemoration the 2000 millennium
Milton Court and Milton Street – after an early 19th century lease owner of this name, or possibly the poet John Milton; prior to this it was Grub/Grubbe Street, after the former owner, or perhaps to a ‘grube’ (drain)[371][372][373]
Mincing Lane – after ‘minchins/mynecen’, a term for the nuns who formerly held property here prior to 1455[371][374][375]
Minerva Walk
Miniver Place – after the type of fur fur, named by connection with the nearby Skinner’s Hall[376]
Minories – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters (Sorores Minores) nuns[371][160][377]
Minster Court and Minster Pavement
Mitre Square and Mitre Street – after the former Mitre Inn which stood near here[371][275]
Modern Court
Monkwell Square – after the former street here also of this name, variously recorded as Mogwellestrate or Mukewellestrate, and thought to refer to a well owned by one Mucca[378][379][380]
Montague Street – after Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu, who owned a mansion here[381]
Monument Street – after the nearby Monument to the Great Fire of London[381][382]
Moorfields and Moorfield Highwalk – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here[381]
Moorgate and Moorgate Place – after the gate, leading to the marshy moorlands beyond, that formerly stood here[381][383]
Moor Lane and Moor Place – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here[381][384][383]
Muscovy Street – after the Muscovy Company of Elizabethan times, or the Russian merchants formerly based here[385][386]
Nettleton Court
Nevill Lane
New Bell Yard
New Bridge Street – named in 1765 as it leads to the then new Blackfriars Bridge[387][388]
Newbury Street – formerly New Street, renamed 1890 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name[387][389]
Newcastle Close – either after a former inn called the Castle located here,[387] or after the city, with reference to the coal trade here[390]
Newcastle Court
New Change, New Change Passage and Old Change Court – formerly Old Change, and named for a former mint and gold exchange here[387][391]
New Court – built circa 1700 and named simply because it was then new[392]
Newgate Street – after a new gate built here in the 1000s; the eastern part of this street was formerly Bladder Street, after the bladder selling trade here[393][394][389]
Newman’s Court – after Lawrence Newman, who lease land here from the [[]] in the 17th century[391]
New Street – named simply as it was new when first built[253][389]
New Union Street – named as it united Moor Lane and Moorfields; it was formerly Gunn Alley[253]
Nicholas Lane and Nicholas Passage – after the former St Nicholas Acons church, destroyed in the Great Fire[253][395][396]
Noble Street – after Thomas de Noble, local 14th century property developer[397][396]
Northumberland Alley – after Northumberland House, house of the Earls of Northumberland, which formerly stood here[398][399]
Norton Folgate – the former word a corruption of ‘North Town’, and the latter after the local Folgate family[398]
Norwich Street – unknown; formerly Norwich Court, and prior to that Magpie Yard, probably from a local inn[399]
Nun Court – thought to be after a local builder/property owner[400]
Oat Lane – as oats were formerly sold here in the Middle Ages[401][290][402]
Octagon Arcade (Broadgate)
Old Bailey – after a bailey fortification that formerly stood here[81][403][402]
Old Billingsgate Walk – after the former watergate of this name, the derivation of ‘Billings’ in unknown[57]
Old Jewry – after a Saxon-era settlement of Jews here, thought to be termed ‘Old’ following the Edict of Expulsion of all Jews from England by Edward I[404][306][405]
Old Mitre Court – after a former tavern of this name here[404][405]
Old Seacole Lane – thought to be after the coal trade that came from the sea and up the river Fleet here[406][407][408]
Old Watermen’s Walk
Outwich Street – after either Oteswich/Ottewich, meaning ‘Otho’s dwelling’, a name for this area of London in the early Middle Ages[409] or the former St Martin Outwich church, named for the Outwich family, demolished 1874[410]
Oystergate Walk – after a watergate here, and the oyster trade[411]
Oxford Court – after a former house here owned by the Earls of Oxford[409][412]
Pageantmaster Court
Pancras Lane – after St Pancras, Soper Lane church which stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire; it was formerly Needlers Lane, after the needle making trade here[413][304][414]
Panyer Alley – after a Medieval brewery here called the ‘panyer’ (basket)[413][415][416]
Paternoster Lane, Paternoster Row and Paternoster Square – after the paternoster (rosary) makers who formerly worked here[417][418][419]
Paul’s Walk
Pemberton Row – after James Pemberton, Lord Mayor of London in 1611[420]
Pepys Street – after 17th century diarist Samuel Pepys, who lived and worked here[421][422]
Peterborough Court – after the abbots of Peterborough, who prior to the Dissolution of the Monasteries had a house here[423][424]
Peter’s Hill – after St Peter, Paul’s Wharf church, which formerly stood here until destroyed in the 1666 fire[423][424]
Petty Wales – unknown, but possibly after a Welsh community formerly based here[425]
Philpot Lane – commemorates prominent local family the Philpots; originally probably after John Philpot, 14th century grocer[426][427][428]
Pilgrim Street – thought to be a former route for pilgrims to St Paul’s cathedral; formerly known as Stonecutters Alley and Little Bridge Street[429]
Pindar Street – after Paul Pindar, 14th–16th century diplomat, who had a house here[430][429]
Pinner’s Passage
Plaisterers Highwalk – after the nearby Worshipful Company of Plaisterers
Plantation Lane
Playhouse Yard – after the Blackfriars Playhouse, which stood here in the 17th century[40][431]
Pleydell Court and Pleydell Street – formerly Silver Street, it was renamed in 1848 by association with the neighbouring Bouverie Street; the Bouverie family were by this time known as the Pleydell-Bouveries[40][71]
Plough Court – thought to be either from an inn of this name, or an ironmongers; formerly Plough Yard[40]
Plough Place – after the Plough/Plow, a 16th-century eating place located here[40][431]
Plumtree Court – thought to be after either literally a plumtree, or else an inn of this name[40][431]
Pope’s Head Alley – after the Pope’s Head Tavern which formerly stood here, thought to stem from the 14th century Florentine merchants who were in Papal service[432][433]
Poppins Court – shortening of Popinjay Court, meaning a parrot; it is thought to stem from the crest of Cirencester Abbey (which featured the bird), who owned a town house here[434][435]
Portsoken Street – after ‘port-soke’, as it was a soke near a port (gate) of the City[436][437]
Post Office Court – after the General Post Office which formerly stood near here[436][438]
Poultry – after the poultry which was formerly sold at the market here[436][439][440]
Priest’s Court – with allusion to the adjacent St Vedast Church[441]
Primrose Hill – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here; formerly called Salisbury Court, as it approaches Salisbury Square[442][441]
Primrose Street – thought to be named after a builder of this name, or possibly the primroses which formerly grew here[442][441]
Prince’s Street – named in reference to the adjacent King and Queen Streets[443][444]
Printers Inn Court – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here
Printer Street – after the printing industry which formerly flourished here[445][444]
Priory Court
Prudent Passage
Pudding Lane – from the former term ‘pudding’ meaning animals’ entrails, which were dumped here in Medieval times by local butchers; it was formerly Rothersgate, after a watergate located here[445][446][447]
Puddle Dock – thought to be either descriptive (after the water here), or named for a local wharf owner of this name[448][449]
Pump Court – after a former pump located here[449]
Quality Court – a descriptive name, as it was superior when built compared with the surrounding streets[450]
Queenhithe – formerly Ethelredshythe, after its founder King Æthelred the Unready, and hythe meaning a wharf/landing place; it was renamed after its later owner Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I[451][452]
Queen Isabella Way –
Queens Head Passage – after a former house here called the Queens Head, demolished 1829[453]
Queen Street and Queen Street Place – named in honour of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II[453][314][454]
Queen Victoria Street – built in 1871 and named for the then reigning monarch[455][314][452]
Rangoon Street – after the former warehouses here of the East India Company, Burma then been part of British India[298][456]
Red Lion Court – after a former inn of this name[457][458]
Rising Sun Court – after the adjacent pub of this name[459]
Robin Hood Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name[460]
Rolls Buildings and Rolls Passage – the former site of a house containing the rolls of Chancery[461][462]
Rood Lane – after a former rood (cross) set up at St Margaret Pattens in the early 16th century; it became an object of veneration and offering, which helped pay for the repair of the church, but was torn down in 1558 as an item of excessive superstition[463][464][465]
Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here[463][465]
Rose Alley – after a former inn of this name[466]
Rose and Crown Court
Rose Street – after a former tavern of this name here; it was formerly Dicer Lane, possibly after either a dice maker here, or a corruption of ‘ditcher’[467]
Royal Exchange Avenue and Royal Exchange Buildings – after the adjacent Royal Exchange[468]
Russia Row – possibly to commemorate Russia’s entry into the Napoleonic wars[469]
St Alphage Garden and St Alphage Highwalk – after the adjacent St Alphege London Wall church, now surviving only in ruins[470][471]
St Andrew Street – after the adjacent St Andrew’s Church[471]
St Andrew’s Hill – after the adjacent St Andrew-by-the-Wardrobe church[471]
St Benet’s Place – after the former St Benet Gracechurch which stood near here; destroyed in the Great Fire, its replacement was then demolished in 1868[79][245]
St Botolph Row and St Botolph Street – after the adjacent St Botolph’s Aldgate church
St Clare Street – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters of St Clare[472][377]
St Dunstan’s Alley, St Dunstan’s Hill and St Dunstan’s Lane – after the former St Dunstan-in-the-East church, largely destroyed in the Blitz and now a small garden[215][473]
St Dunstan’s Court – after the nearby St Dunstan-in-the-West church[473]
St Georges Court – after the former St George Botolph Lane church nearby, demolished in 1904
St Giles Terrace – after the adjacent St Giles-without-Cripplegate church
St James’s Passage – after St James Duke’s Place church, demolished 1874[474]
St Katherine’s Row – after the St Katherine Coleman church, demolished in 1926[475][476]
St Margaret’s Close – after the adjacent St Margaret Lothbury church
St Martin’s le Grand – after a former church of this name here, demolished in 1538[477][478][479]
St Mary at Hill – after the St Mary-at-Hill church here[480][481][482]
St Mary Axe – after the former Church of St Mary Axe here, demolished in the 1500s[480][478][482]
St Michael’s Alley – after the adjacent St Michael, Cornhill church[482]
St Mildred’s Court – after the former St Mildred, Poultry church, demolished 1872[480][482]
St Olave’s Court – after the former St Olave Old Jewry church here, of which only the tower remains[483][482]
St Paul’s Churchyard – after the adjacent St Paul’s Cathedral; the churchyard was formerly far more extensive, but has since been built over[484][485]
St Peter’s Alley – after the adjacent St Peter upon Cornhill church[485]
St Swithins Lane – after the former St Swithin, London Stone, largely destroyed in the Blitz and later demolished[486][395][487]
Salisbury Court and Salisbury Square – after the London house of the bishops of Salisbury, located here prior to the Reformation[488][489]
Salters Court – after the former hall of the Worshipful Company of Salters, moved in 1600[488][412]
Salter’s Hall Court – after the former hall of the Worshipful Company of Salters, destroyed in the Blitz[488][412]
Sandy’s Row – after a builder or property owner of this name[490]
Saracens Head Yard – after a former inn of this name[490][491]
Savage Gardens – after Thomas Savage, who owned a house here in the 1620s[492][491]
Scott’s Lane
Seething Lane – formerly Shyvethenestrat and Sivethenelane, deriving from Old English sifetha, meaning chaff/siftings, after the local corn threshing[493][494][495]
Serjeants Inn – after the former Serjeant’s Inn located here before the Blitz[496][495]
Sermon Lane – thought to be after Adam la Sarmoner, 13th century landowner[496][497][498]
Shafts Court – named after a maypole (or ‘shaft’) that formerly stood nearby at the junction of Leadenhall Street and St Mary Axe[499]
Sherborne Lane – earlier Shirebourne Lane, alteration of the Medieval Shitteborelane, in reference to a public privy here[500][501][502]
Ship Tavern Passage – after the nearby Ship tavern[503]
Shoe Lane – as this lane formerly led to a shoe-shaped landholding/field[504][505][503]
Shorter Street
Silk Street – thought to be named for its late 18th century builder, or the silk trade formerly located here[506][507]
Sise Lane – as it formerly led to St Benet Sherehog church, which was dedicated to St Osyth (later corrupted to Sythe, then Sise)[506][395][507]
Skinners Lane – after the fur trade that was former prevalent here; it was formerly Maiden Lane, after a local inn or shop[506][508][376]
Smithfield Street and West Smithfield – derives from the Old English ‘smooth-field’, a series of fields outside the City walls[509][376][376]
Snow Hill and Snow Hill Court – formerly Snore Hill or Snowrehill, exact meaning unknown[509][510][511]
Southampton Buildings – after Southampton House which formerly stood here, built for the bishops of Lincoln in the 12th century and later acquired by the earls of Southampton[509]
South Place and South Place Mews – named as it is south of Moorfields[512][513]
Southwark Bridge – as it leads to Southwark[514]
Speed Highwalk – after John Speed, Stuart-era mapmaker, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate
Staining Lane – from Saxon-era ‘Staeninga haga’, meaning place owned by the people of Staines[515][516][517]
Staple Inn and Staple Inn Buildings – after the adjacent Staple Inn[508][517]
Star Alley – after a former inn here of this name[518]
Stationer’s Hall Court – after the adjacent hall of the Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers[519][520]
Steelyard Passage – presumably after a former steelworks here
Stew Lane – after a former stew (hot bath) here[521][518]
Stonecutter Street – after the former stonecutting trade that took place here[522][520]
Stone House Court – after a former medieval building here called the Stone House[520]
Stoney Lane – simply a descriptive name, streets typically being mud tracks in former times[523][520]
Suffolk Lane – after a former house here belonging to the dukes of Suffolk[524][525][526]
Sugar Bakers Court – presumably descriptive
Sugar Quay Walk – presumably descriptive
Sun Court
Sun Street and Sun Street Passage – after a former inn of this name[524]
Swan Lane – after a former inn here called the Olde Swanne; formerly Ebbgate, after a watergate here[527][176]
Swedeland Court – after the former Swedish community based here[528][527]
Talbot Court – after a former inn of this name (or ‘Tabard’)[529][528]
Tallis Street – after the 16th century composer Thomas Tallis, by connection with the adjacent former Guildhall School of Music and Drama[530][531]
Telegraph Street – renamed (from Bell Alley, after a former inn) when the General Post Office’s telegraph department opened there[532][517][533]
Temple Avenue and Temple Lane – after the adjacent Temple legal district[532][534]
The Terrace (off King’s Bench Walk) – presumably descriptive
Thavies Inn – after a house here owned by the armourer Thomas (or John) Thavie in the 14th century[535][536]
Thomas More Highwalk – after 16th century author and statesman Thomas More
Threadneedle Street and Threadneedle Walk – originally Three Needle Street, after the sign on a needle shop located here, later corrupted due to the obvious collocation of ‘thread’ and ‘needle’[537][538][539]
Three Barrels Walk
Three Cranes Walk
Three Nun Court
Three Quays Walk
Throgmorton Avenue and Throgmorton Street – after 16th century diplomat Nicholas Throckmorton; the Avenue was built in 1876[537][314][539]
Tokenhouse Yard – after a 17th-century token house here (a house selling tokens during coin shortages)[540][541]
Took’s Court – after local 17th century builder/owner Thomas Tooke[540][542]
Tower Hill Terrace – after the adjacent Tower Hill[543][544]
Tower Royal – after a former Medieval tower and later royal lodging house that stood here; ‘Royal’ is in fact a corruption of La Réole, France, where local wine merchants hailed from[543][544]
Trig Lane – after one of several people with the surname Trigge, recorded here in the Middle Ages[525]
Trinity Square – after the adjacent Trinity House[545][546]
Trump Street – unknown, but thought to be after either a local builder or property owner[545] or the local trumpet-making industry[546]
Tudor Street – after the Tudor dynasty, with reference to Henry VIII’s nearby Bridewell Palace[545][547]
Turnagain Lane – descriptive, as it is a dead-end; recorded in the 13th century as Wendageyneslane[548][549][547]
Undershaft – named after a maypole (or ‘shaft’) that formerly stood nearby at the junction of Leadenhall Street and St Mary Axe[499][550]
Union Court – named as when built it connected Wormwood Street to Old Broad Street[551]
Victoria Avenue – named in 1901 in honour of Queen Victoria[552][33]
Victoria Embankment – after Queen Victoria, reigning queen at the time of the building of the Thames Embankment[552][33]
Vine Street – formerly Vine Yard, unknown but thought to be ether from a local inn or a vineyard[552][553]
Vintners Court – after the adjacent Worshipful Company of Vintners building; the area has been associated with the wine trade as far back as the 10th century[554][553]
Viscount Street – formerly Charles Street, both names after the Charles Egerton, Viscount Brackley, of which there were three in the 17th–18th centuries[555][556]
Waithman Street – after Robert Waithman, Lord Mayor of London 1823-33[557][558]
Walbrook and Walbrook Wharf – after the Walbrook stream which formerly flowed here, possibly with reference to the Anglo-Saxon ‘wealh’ meaning ‘foreigner’ (i.e. the native Britons, or ‘Welsh’)[559][560][561]
Wardrobe Place and Wardrobe Terrace – after the Royal Wardrobe which formerly stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666[562][563]
Warwick Lane, Warwick Passage and Warwick Square – after the Neville family, earls of Warwick, who owned a house near here in the 1400s; formerly Old Dean’s Lane, after a house here resided in by the Dean of St Paul’s[564][565][566]
Watergate – after a watergate which stood here on the Thames[564][566]
Water Lane – after a former watergate that stood here by the Thames; formerly Spurrier Lane[567]
Watling Court and Watling Street – corrupted from the old name of Athelingestrate (Saxon Prince Street), by association with the more famous Roman Watling Street[564][568][569]
Well Court – after the numerous wells formerly located in this area[570]
Whalebone Court
Whitecross Place
Whitecross Street – after a former white cross which stood near here in the 1200s[105][571]
Whitefriars Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I[105][571]
White Hart Court – after a former inn of this name[105][572]
White Hart Street
White Horse Yard – after a former inn of this name[573][571]
White Kennett Street – after White Kennett, rector of St Botolph’s Aldgate in the early 1700s[573][571]
White Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, destroyed by fire in 1765[573][571]
White Lion Hill – this formerly led to White Lion Wharf, which is thought to have been named after a local inn[573]
White Lyon Court
Whittington Avenue – after Richard Whittington, former Lord Mayor of London[573][574]
Widegate Street – thought to be after a gate that formerly stood on this street; formerly known as Whitegate Alley[575][576]
Willoughby Highwalk – presumably after Sir Francis Willoughby, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church
Wilson Street
Wine Office Court – after an office here that granted licenses to sell wine in the 17th century[577][578]
Wood Street – as wood and fire logs were sold here as part of the Cheapside market[579][394][580]
Wormwood Street – after the wormwood formerly grown here for medicine
Wrestler’s Court – after a former Tudor-era house here of this name

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London districts of Clerkenwell and Finsbury, in the London Borough of Islington. The Clerkenwell/Finsbury area has no formally defined boundaries – those used here are: Pentonville Road to the north, Goswell Road to the east, Clerkenwell Road to the south and Gray’s Inn Road to the west. Finsbury was traditionally roughly the northern part of the area covered here, however in practice the name is rarely used these days.

Acton Street – after Acton Meadow which formerly occupied this site[1][2]
Agdon Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned a property called Agdon in Warwickshire[3][4]
Albermarle Way – after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century[5]
Ampton Place and Ampton Street – after its builder the 3rd Lord Calthorpe, who owned land at Ampton, Suffolk[6][2]
Amwell Street – after the nearby New River, which starts at Amwell, Hertfordshire[7][8]
Arlington Way – unknown; before 1936 called Arlington Street[9][10]
Ashby Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire[11][4]
Attneave Street – thought to be named after A Attneave, local builder in the 1890s[12][13]
Aylesbury Street – after the earl of Aylesbury, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[12][14]
Back Hill – as it lies off (or to the ‘back’) of a main road[14]
Baker’s Row and Baker’s Yard – after Richard Baker, a local 18th century carpenter[15][16]
Bath Yard –
Berry Place and Berry Street – after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner[17][18]
Bevin Way – after prominent Labour politician Ernest Bevin[19][20]
Bowling Green Lane – after the former Bowling Green House on this site, demolished 1933. The house had been built over an old bowling green which dated back to the 18th century[21][22]
Brewhouse Yard – after a former brewery on this site[23][24]
Britannia Street – built in the 1760s and named to suggest patriotism[25][26]
Calthorpe Street – after Henry Gough-Calthorpe, 1st Baron Calthorpe, local 18th century landowner, and his descendants who developed the local street plan[27][2]
Catherine Griffiths Court – after Catherine Griffiths (1885-1988), a suffragette, founder of the Finsbury Women’s Committee in the 1920s, and mayor of Finsbury in 1960[28]
Chadwell Street – after Chadwell Spring in Amwell, Hertfordshire, source of the nearby New River, or possibly William Chadwell Mylne[29][8]
Claremont Close and Claremont Square – after the nearby Claremont Chapel on Pentonville Road (now the Crafts Council), which was named after Claremont, Surrey, the country house of the recently deceased Princess Charlotte of Wales [30][31]
Clerkenwell Close, Clerkenwell Green and Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area[32][33]
Coldbath Square – after a former cold spring on this site that was used for medicinal purposes in the 17th – 18th centuries[34][35]
Coley Street –
Compton Passage and Compton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton[36][4]
Corporation Row – after the former New Corporation Work House, built here in the 1660s; prior to this it was known as Cut Throat Lane[37][38]
Crawford Passage – after Peter Crawford, landlord of a former pub here called the Pickled Egg; the passage was formerly Pickled Egg Walk[39][40]
Cruickshank Street – after George Cruikshank, 19th century illustrator who lived on nearby Amwell Street[41][42]
Cubitt Street – after the prominent 19th century builder Thomas Cubitt, who built this street; it was formerly called Arthur Street[41][43]
Cumberland Gardens – unknown; prior to 1929 this was Cumberland Terrace[44][45]
Cyrus Street – possibly after the Persian King of this name; prior to 1880 it was called King Street[46][47]
Dabbs Lane –
Dallington Street – after Robert Dallington, master of the Charterhouse in the 1620s[48][49]
Earlstoke Street – corruption of Erlestoke: local landowner Charles Compton, 1st Marquess of Northampton married in 1787 Maria Smith, daughter of Joshua Smith MP, of Erlestoke Park, Wiltshire[50][51][4]
Easton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned property in Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire[52][4]
Elm Street – possibly for the former elm tress located here[53]
Exmouth Market – after Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth, prominent 18th – 19th century naval officer[54][55]
Eyre Street Hill – unknown; formerly called Little Bath Street[56][55]
Farringdon Lane and Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[57][58][59]
Fernsbury Street – named in 1912 after an early variant of ‘Finsbury’, former name for this area[57][60]
Field Street – built over Battle Bridge Field[61], or possibly after Peter Field, early 19th century builder[62]
Fleet Square – presumably as the river Fleet flowed near here
Frederick Street – after local landowners the Barons Calthorpe, the 4th and 5th of whom were called Frederick[63][2]
Friend Street – after George Friend, local scarlet-dyer who founded a free clinic nearby in 1780[64][65]
Garnault Mews and Garnault Street – after Samuel Garnault, 18th century treasurer of the New River Company[66][8]
Gloucester Way – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester[67][68]
Goswell Place and Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called ‘Goswelle’ or ‘Goderell’ which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk,[69] whilst others state it derives from “God’s Well”, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship.[70] or else a former ‘Gode Well’ located here[2]
Gough Street – after Richard Gough, wool merchant and local landowner in the early 18th century[71][2]
Granville Square and Granville Street – after Granville Sharp, notable opponent of the slave trade; he was the uncle of Mary Sharp, who married local landowner Thomas Lloyd Baker[72][68]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[72][73]
Great Sutton Street and Sutton Lane – after Thomas Sutton, who founded the nearby Charterhouse School in 1611[72][49]
Green Terrace and Green Yard – possibly after the adjacent Spa Green, or instead John Grene, Clerk to the New River Company in the late 1600s[74]
Gwynne Place – after Nell Gwynne, mistress of Charles II, who lived near here[75][76]
Hardwick Mews and Hardwick Street – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester[67][68]
Hayward’s Place – after James Hayward, local 19th century landowner and ironmonger[77][78]
Herbal Hill and Herbal Place – after a former herb garden near here belonging to the Bishops of Ely, former local landowners[79][80]
Hermit Street – after a hermitage established here in 1511 by the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem[81][82]
Holford Mews, Holdford Place and Holford Street – after the Holford family, who worked on the New River) scheme in the 18th century[83][8]
Holsworthy Square –
Ingle Mews and Inglebert Street – after William Inglebert, 17th century engineer who worked on the New River scheme[84][8]
Jerusalem Passage – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem[85][86]
King’s Cross Bridge and Kings Cross Road – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here[87][88]
Langton Close – after the Arthur Langton Nurses Home formerly located here[89]
Laystall Street – after a former nearby laystall, a term for a refuse heap[90][91]
Leeke Street – 72
Leo Yard – from the Latin for lion, as it was formerly Red Lion Yard[92]
Lloyd’s Row, Lloyd Square, Lloyd Street and Lloyd Baker Street – after the Lloyd Baker family, local 19th century landowners[93][68]
Lorenzo Street – unknown; formerly York Street[94][95]
Malta Street – unknown, though probably by association with the nearby Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem (also Knights of Malta); formerly Queen Street [96][97]
Manningford Close –
Margery Street – after a family member of local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton; it was formerly Margaret Street[98][4]
Meredith Street – after John Meredith, local landowner and member of the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land[99][100]
Merlin Street – after a former local pub, the New Merlin’s Cave after a local landowner of this name[99][101]
Mount Pleasant – ironically named after a former nearby refuse tip[102][103]
Myddelton Passage, Myddelton Square and Myddelton Street – after Hugh Myddleton, who devised the New River scheme in the early 17th century[104][8]
Mylne Street – after Robert Mylne, who did much engineering work for the New River Company, as did his son William Chadwell Mylne[99][8]
Naoroji Street – after Dadabhai Naoroji, who was active in local politics in the late 19th century[105]
Newcastle Row – after Newcastle House, which formerly stood here; the house was named after its 17th century owner William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle[106]
Northampton Road, Northampton Row and Northampton Square – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton[36][4]
Northburgh Street – after Michael de Northburgh, a bishop who founded the nearby Charterhouse monastery in 1371[36][49]
Owen Street and Owen’s Row – after Dame Alice Owen, who founded almshouses near here in 1609[107][82]
Paget Street – after Sir James Paget, 19th century surgeon, who had a clinic on nearby Friend Street[6][65]
Pakenham Street – after its builder the 3rd Lord Calthorpe, who owned land at Pakenham, Suffolk[6][2]
Pardon Street – after the Pardon Chapel which stood near here in the Middle Ages[108][109]
Pear Tree Court – thought to be from a local pear tree[110][111]
Penton Rise and Pentonville Road – after Henry Penton, who developed this area in the late 18th century[112][113]
Percival Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was a cousin of Spencer Perceval[112][4]
Percy Circus, Percy Yard and Great Percy Street – after Robert Percy Smith, 19th century MP who was a director of the New River Company[112][8]
Phoenix Place and Phoenix Yard – after the former Phoenix Iron Foundry near here[114][115]
Pine Street – Wood Street prior to 1877, probably both names after an avenue of tree that formerly stood here, or possibly after Thomas Wood, 18th century leaseholder[116][117]
Poole’s Buildings –
Prideaux Place – after Arthur R Prideaux, 19th century director of the New River Company[112][8]
Rawstorne Place and Rawstorne Street – after local 18th century bricklayer Thomas Rawstorne[118][82]
Ray Street and Ray Street Bridge – corruption of ‘Rag’, after the former local rag trade here; the streets was formerly two different streets – Hockley in the Hole and Town’s End Lane[118][119]
River Passage, River Street and River Street Mews – after the nearby New River[120][8]
Robert’s Place – probably after Richard Roberts, who built much of the local area in the 1800s[121]
Rosebery Avenue and Rosebery Square – after Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, 19th century Prime Minister; he was chairman of the London County Council when this street was built in 1889[122][123]
Rosoman Place – after Thomas Rosoman, first manager of the nearby Sadler’s Wells Theatre in the 18th century[122][124]
Sage Way –
St Chad’s Place – after the nearby St Chad’s well, reputed to be a medieval holy well; St Chad was a 7th-century bishop[125][126]
St Helena Street – believed to be named after St Helena, in commemoration of Napoleon’s exile there in 1815[127][128]
St James’s Walk – after the adjacent St James’s Church, Clerkenwell[33]
St John Street and St John’s Square – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century[129][86]
Sans Walk – after Edward Sans, named in 1893 as he was then oldest member of the local parish vestry[130][131]
Scotswood Street –
Sebastian Street – after Lewis Sebastian, former Master of the Worshipful Company of Skinners and chairman of the governors of Northampton Polytechnic (now City University)[132][100]
Seddon Street –
Sekforde Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse[132][133]
Sherston Court –
Skinner Street – after the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land when the street was built in the 1810s[134][135]
Soley Mews –
Spafield Street – after a former spa on this site which closed in 1776[136][137]
Spencer Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was cousins with Spencer Perceval
Swinton Place and Swinton Street – after local 18th century landowner James Swinton[138][2]
Tompion Street – after 17th century clockmaker Thomas Tompion; formerly called Smith Street [139]
Topham Street – after local strongman Topham the Strong Man, who performed feats of strength here in the 18th century[140][141]
Tysoe Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Tysoe in Northamptonshire[142][4]
Vernon Rise and Vernon Square – after Robert Vernon, 1st Baron Lyveden, 19th century director of the New River Company[112][8]
Vine Hill and Vine Street Bridge – after the vineyards owned by the Bishops of Ely formerly located here[143]
Vineyard Walk – after a former 18th century vineyard on this site[144][143]
Warner Street and Warner Yard – after Robert Warner, local 18th century landowner[145][16]
Wells Square –
Weston Rise – after John Weston, who built this road in the 1790s[146][147]
Wharton Street – unknown[147]
Whiskin Way – after John Whiskin, local landowner/builder in the 19th century[135][99]
White Bear Yard –
Wicklow Street – possibly from Wicklow in Ireland[89]
Wilmington Square and Wilmington Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who also had the title Baron Wilmington[148][4]
Woodbridge Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse; Sekford was born in Woodbridge, Suffolk[132][133]
Wren Street – after prominent architect Sir Christopher Wren[149][150]
Wyclif Street – after John Wycliffe, noted 14th century religious reformer; by association with the former nearby Smithfield Martyrs’ Memorial Church[149][151]
Wynyatt Street – corruption of ‘Wynyates’; after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Compton Wynyates in Northamptonshire[149][4]
Yardley Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was born at Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Covent Garden. Covent Garden has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are: Shaftesbury Avenue to the north-west, New Oxford Street and High Holborn to the north, Kingsway and the western half of the Aldwych semi-circle to the east, Strand to the south and Charing Cross Road to the west.

Adelaide Street – after Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen, wife of King William IV (the street was laid out in 1818 when he was still a prince)[1][2]
Agar Street – after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough[3][4]
Aldwych – from Old English ‘Ealdwic’ or ‘Aldwic’, meaning ‘old settlement’, given by Anglo-Saxons referring to a Danish settlement here of the 9th century[5][6][7]
Arne Street – after the 18th century composer Thomas Arne, who was born near here[8][9]
Banbury Court – after Nicholas Knollys, 3rd Earl of Banbury, who owned a house here called banbury House[10]
Bedfordbury – presumably after the 4th Earl of Bedford, who built much of the area in the 17th century[11]
Bedford Court and Bedford Street – after the 4th Earl of Bedford, who built much of the area in the 17th century[11]
Betterton Street – after Thomas Betterton, prominent actor of the 17th century[12][13]
Bow Street – after its curving bow-like shape[14][15]
Broad Court – a descriptive name [16]
Brydges Place – after Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos, father-in-law of the 4th Earl of Bedford who built much of the area in the 17th century[17]
Bull Inn Court – formerly led to the Bull Inn which stood on Strand[18][19]
Burleigh Street – site of a house belonging to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, Secretary of State to Elizabeth I[20][21]
Cambridge Circus – after Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, who formally opened the new development of Charing Cross Road in 1887[22][23]
Catherine Street – after Catherine of Braganza, queen of Charles II, reigning monarch when the street was laid out[24][25]
Cecil Court – after the Cecil family, earls of Salisbury, who owned this land from the 17th century on[26][27]
Chandos Place – after Giles Brydges, 3rd Baron Chandos, father-in-law of the 4th Earl of Bedford who built much of the area in the 17th century[28][17]
Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[29][30][31][32]
Ching Court – after the Comyn Ching Co., a former ironmongers near here[33]
Conduit Court – thought to be named after Leonard Cunditt/Conduit, an innholder in Long Acre in the 1600s[34][35]
Covent Garden – corruption of ‘Convent Garden’, after the gardens belonging to Abbey of St Peter, Westminster in the 1200s[36][37]
Cranbourn Street – built in the 1670s and named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (or Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset[38][27]
Crown Court – from the former Crown Inn, which stood on the corner with Russell Street[39][40]
Cubitt’s Yard – presumably after either William Cubitt, Lord Mayor of London (1860–1862) or Thomas Cubitt, 19th century street developer
Dragon Yard – unknown; nb: street is no longer signed
Drury Lane – and old street, renamed in honour of Sir William (or Robert) Drury in the 16th century who owned a house at the southern end of the street[41][42]
Dryden Street – after the 17th century poet John Dryden, who lives nearby and whose poem-dramas were often performed in the theatres nearby[41][42]
Duncannon Street – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough, who built the street with George Agar in the 1830s[8][4]
Dunn’s Passage –
Earlham Street – formerly two streets – Great and Little Earl Street, later renamed to avoid confusion with various other Earl Streets; which earl it commemorated is unknown[43][44]
Endell Street – named after the rector of St Giles, James Endell Tyler in 1846[45][46]
Exchange Court – opened in the mid-17th century opposite the New Exchange (covered row of shops)[47][48]
Exeter Street – site of a house belonging to William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, whose son later became earl of Exeter; laid out in 1676 following the demolition of the house[47][21]
Floral Street – renamed after the Floral Hall in 1895, both in reference to Covent Garden’s flower markets. The street was formerly Hart Street, from the 16th century White Hart Inn[49][50]
Garrick Street and Garrick Yard – after David Garrick, successful actor of the 18th century[51][52]
Goodwin’s Court –
Grape Street – formerly ‘Vine Street’, both in reference to a former vineyard on this site probably belonging to the former St Giles hospital [53]
Great Newport Street – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on what is now Chinatown’s Little Newport Street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today[54][55]
Great Queen Street – laid out in the 16th century and named in honour of the contemporary royal family; the ‘Great’ prefix was added to contrast with Little Queen Street which formerly adjoined[56][57]
Hanover Place – after the Royal House of Hanover; formerly Phoenix Place [58][59]
Heathcock Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name[60]
Henrietta Street – named after Henrietta Maria, consort of Charles I, reigning king when the street was built in 1631[61][62]
High Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that the road led away from the river to higher ground.[63][64][65]
Hop Gardens – the abbey of St Peter used gardens near here to grow hops in the early Middle Ages[66][67]
Inigo Place – after Inigo Jones, who designed much of the Covent Garden area in the 1630s[68][69]
James Street – named after Prince James, later James II, son of Charles I who was reigning king when this street was built in the 1630s[70][71]
Kean Street – after Edmund Kean, successful Shakespearian actor of the 19th century, and his actor son Charles Kean[72][73]
Keeley Street – after Robert Keeley, successful actor and comedian of the 19th century[72][73]
Kemble Street – after the Kemble family, who were active in the local theatre community in the 18th and 19th centuries[72][73]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1630s[74][75]
Langley Court and Langley Street – after Sir Roger Langley, who owned land here in the early 18th century[76][77]
Lazenby Court –
Litchfield Street – unknown, though possibly after Edward Lee, 1st Earl of Lichfield, who was brother-in-law of Henry FitzRoy, 1st Duke of Grafton and son of Charles II[78], or Charlotte Lee, Countess of Lichfield, daughter of Charles II[79]
Long Acre – after the garden/field of the abbey of St Peter; the road was laid out in 1615[80][81]
Lumley Court –
Macklin Street – after Charles Macklin, 18th century actor[82]
Maiden Lane – not known, but thought to be from a shop of inn containing the word ‘maiden’ that formerly stood here; the names dates to 1636[72][83], or perhaps after midden heaps[84]
Martlett Court – thought to be a corruption of St Martin’s, from St Martin-in-the-Fields church[85]
Matthews Yard –
Mays Court – after Henry May, local property owner in the 18th century, built by his family after his death[86]
Mercer Street – after the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who owned a field near here in the 14th century; it was formerly Little White Lion Street[87][88]
Monmouth Street – after James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, son of Charles II who owned a house on nearby Soho Square; it was formerly two street – Great and Little St Andrew’s Street[89][90]
Museum Street – after the British Museum to which it leads[91][92]
Neal Street and Neal’s Yard – after Thomas Neale, who laid out the Seven Dials development in 1693; Neal Street was formerly King Street, and Neal’s Yard formerly King’s Head Court[93][94]
New Oxford Street – built as an extension of Oxford Street in 1845-47[95][96]
New Row – formerly New Street, built in 1635-37 as a new replacement for an existing alley[95][96]
Newton Street – after William Newton, who built the street and the nearby Lincoln’s inn Fields in the 1630s[97][55]
Nottingham Court – after Heneage Finch, 1st Earl of Nottingham, who owned a house nearby in the 17th century[98][99]
Odham’s Walk –
Old Brewer’s Yard – presumably after an old brewery here
Parker Mews and Parker Street – from Philip Parker, a local resident in the 17th century[100][101]
Princes Circus –
Rose Street –
Russell Street – after Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford, local landowners in the 17th century[102][103]
St Martin’s Court, St Martin’s Courtyard and Saint Martin’s Lane, St Martin-in-the-Fields Church Path and St Martin’s Place – after St Martin-in-the-Fields church adjacent[104]
Seven Dials and Seven Dials Court – after the seven dials on the sundial column, and the seven adjoining streets; laid out by Thomas Neal in 1693[93][105]
Shelton Street – after William Shelton, who provided money for a local charitable school for the poor on nearby Parker Street in his will in the 17th century[106][107]
Shorts Gardens – after the Short family, who owned a house near here in the 17th century; it was formerly Queen Street[108][109]
Slingsby Place – after Sir William Slingsby, who purchased this land in the 17th century[110][88]
Smart’s Place – probably from William Smart, a carpenter who lived near here in the early 18th century[111][112]
Southampton Street – after the earls of Southampton, who owned Southampton House in Bloomsbury in the 16th century; Edward Russell, 3rd Earl of Bedford and local landowner married a daughter and heiress of the Southamptons, and this street was named in her/their honour[113][114]
Strand and Strand Lane – from Old English ‘stond’, meaning the edge of a river; the river Thames formerly reached here prior to the building of the Thames Embankment[115][116]
Stukeley Street – after William Stukeley, clergyman and archaeologist, who lived nearby in the 18th century[117][118]
Tavistock Court and Tavistock Street – from the Russell family, earls and later dukes of Bedford, local land owners in the 17th century whose estate was at Tavistock, Devon[119][120]
Tower Court and Tower Street – named after a former inn on this site, closed 1848; Tower Court was formerly Lumber Court[121][122]
Wellington Street – after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington[123][124]
West Street – unknown, possibly it was on the western boundary of St Gile’s parish; formerly Hog Street [125][126]
West Central Street – named in 1894, after the recent innovation of postcodes (this being the boundary between WC1 and WC1)[127]
Wild Court and Wild Street – corruption of ‘Weld’, after Henry Weld who lived in Weld House on this site in the 17th century[128][129]
William IV Street – named after William IV, reigning king when the street was laid out by John Nash in 1831

Farringdon has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are: Clerkenwell Road to the north, Goswell Road and Aldersgate Street to the east, Charterhouse Street, Charterhouse Square and Carthusian Street to the south and Farringdon Road to the west.

Albion Place – thought to be simply a suitably patriotic name; formerly George Court [9][10]
Aldersgate Street – the name Aldersgate is first recorded around 1000 in the form Ealdredesgate, i.e. “gate associated with a man named Ealdrad”. The gate, constructed by the Romans in the 2nd or 3rd centuries when London Wall was constructed, probably acquired its name in the late Saxon period.[11][12][13]
Benjamin Street – unknown; thought to probably be for a local landowner/builder [9][14]
Briset Street – after Jordan de Briset, local 12th century landowner who gave land to the Order of St John for their headquarters here[15][16]
Britton Street – after Thomas Britton, local coal seller and prominent patron of the arts, who lived nearby in the 17th – 18th century; it was formerly known as Red Lion Street, after a local inn[15][17]
Broad Yard –
Carthusian Street – after the Carthusian monks who lived near here in the Middle Ages[18][19]
Charterhouse Buildings, Charterhouse Mews, Charterhouse Square and Charterhouse Street – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France; a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371[20][19]
Cowcross Street – this street was path for cattle being taken to nearby Smithfield market[21][22]
Dickens Mews – presumably after Victorian author Charles Dickens
Eagle Court – after Eagle, Lincolnshire; the Order of Knights of St John owned land in this village and the Bailiff of Eagle owned a house near here[23][24]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[25][1][26]
Faulkners Alley –
Fox and Knot Street – after the Fox and Knot tavern of the 18th century[27][28]
Francis Court –
Glasshouse Yard – after a 17th-century glass factory on this site[29][30]
Goswell Road – There is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called ‘Goswelle’ or ‘Goderell’ which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk, and others a well called the Gode Well[31] whilst others state it derives from “God’s Well”, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship.[32][33]
Greenhill’s Rents – after John Greenhill, local 18th century property owner[34][35]
Hat and Mitre Court – after an 18th-century tavern of this name [36]
Passing Alley – altered from the descriptive Pissing Alley, renamed at some point prior to the 1790s [37][38]
Peter’s Lane – after the former St Peter’s Key pub on this site[39][40]
Rutland Place – after the Manners family, earls of Rutland, local property owners of the 17th century[41][19]
St John’s Lane, St John’s Path, St John’s Place, St John’s Square and St John Street – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century[42][24]
Smokehouse Yard – after the bacon stoves formerly located here[43]
Stable Court –
Turk’s Head Yard – after an 18th-century tavern of this name here [44]
Turnmill Street – originally 13th century ‘Trimullstrete’ or ‘Three Mills Street’, after three mills that stood near here by the river Fleet[45][46]
White Horse Alley –

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London districts of Clerkenwell and Finsbury, in the London Borough of Islington. The Clerkenwell/Finsbury area has no formally defined boundaries – those used here are: Pentonville Road to the north, Goswell Road to the east, Clerkenwell Road to the south and Gray’s Inn Road to the west. Finsbury was traditionally roughly the northern part of the area covered here, however in practice the name is rarely used these days.

Acton Street – after Acton Meadow which formerly occupied this site[1][2]
Agdon Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned a property called Agdon in Warwickshire[3][4]
Albermarle Way – after Elizabeth, Dowager Duchess of Albermarle, who lived at Newcastle House nearby in the 18th century[5]
Ampton Place and Ampton Street – after its builder the 3rd Lord Calthorpe, who owned land at Ampton, Suffolk[6][2]
Amwell Street – after the nearby New River, which starts at Amwell, Hertfordshire[7][8]
Arlington Way – unknown; before 1936 called Arlington Street[9][10]
Ashby Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who had a seat at Castle Ashby, Northamptonshire[11][4]
Attneave Street – thought to be named after A Attneave, local builder in the 1890s[12][13]
Aylesbury Street – after the earl of Aylesbury, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[12][14]
Back Hill – as it lies off (or to the ‘back’) of a main road[14]
Baker’s Row and Baker’s Yard – after Richard Baker, a local 18th century carpenter[15][16]
Bath Yard –
Berry Place and Berry Street – after Thomas Berry, local early 19th century landowner[17][18]
Bevin Way – after prominent Labour politician Ernest Bevin[19][20]
Bowling Green Lane – after the former Bowling Green House on this site, demolished 1933. The house had been built over an old bowling green which dated back to the 18th century[21][22]
Brewhouse Yard – after a former brewery on this site[23][24]
Britannia Street – built in the 1760s and named to suggest patriotism[25][26]
Calthorpe Street – after Henry Gough-Calthorpe, 1st Baron Calthorpe, local 18th century landowner, and his descendants who developed the local street plan[27][2]
Catherine Griffiths Court – after Catherine Griffiths (1885-1988), a suffragette, founder of the Finsbury Women’s Committee in the 1920s, and mayor of Finsbury in 1960[28]
Chadwell Street – after Chadwell Spring in Amwell, Hertfordshire, source of the nearby New River, or possibly William Chadwell Mylne[29][8]
Claremont Close and Claremont Square – after the nearby Claremont Chapel on Pentonville Road (now the Crafts Council), which was named after Claremont, Surrey, the country house of the recently deceased Princess Charlotte of Wales [30][31]
Clerkenwell Close, Clerkenwell Green and Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area[32][33]
Coldbath Square – after a former cold spring on this site that was used for medicinal purposes in the 17th – 18th centuries[34][35]
Coley Street –
Compton Passage and Compton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton[36][4]
Corporation Row – after the former New Corporation Work House, built here in the 1660s; prior to this it was known as Cut Throat Lane[37][38]
Crawford Passage – after Peter Crawford, landlord of a former pub here called the Pickled Egg; the passage was formerly Pickled Egg Walk[39][40]
Cruickshank Street – after George Cruikshank, 19th century illustrator who lived on nearby Amwell Street[41][42]
Cubitt Street – after the prominent 19th century builder Thomas Cubitt, who built this street; it was formerly called Arthur Street[41][43]
Cumberland Gardens – unknown; prior to 1929 this was Cumberland Terrace[44][45]
Cyrus Street – possibly after the Persian King of this name; prior to 1880 it was called King Street[46][47]
Dabbs Lane –
Dallington Street – after Robert Dallington, master of the Charterhouse in the 1620s[48][49]
Earlstoke Street – corruption of Erlestoke: local landowner Charles Compton, 1st Marquess of Northampton married in 1787 Maria Smith, daughter of Joshua Smith MP, of Erlestoke Park, Wiltshire[50][51][4]
Easton Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned property in Easton Maudit, Northamptonshire[52][4]
Elm Street – possibly for the former elm tress located here[53]
Exmouth Market – after Edward Pellew, 1st Viscount Exmouth, prominent 18th – 19th century naval officer[54][55]
Eyre Street Hill – unknown; formerly called Little Bath Street[56][55]
Farringdon Lane and Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[57][58][59]
Fernsbury Street – named in 1912 after an early variant of ‘Finsbury’, former name for this area[57][60]
Field Street – built over Battle Bridge Field[61], or possibly after Peter Field, early 19th century builder[62]
Fleet Square – presumably as the river Fleet flowed near here
Frederick Street – after local landowners the Barons Calthorpe, the 4th and 5th of whom were called Frederick[63][2]
Friend Street – after George Friend, local scarlet-dyer who founded a free clinic nearby in 1780[64][65]
Garnault Mews and Garnault Street – after Samuel Garnault, 18th century treasurer of the New River Company[66][8]
Gloucester Way – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester[67][68]
Goswell Place and Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called ‘Goswelle’ or ‘Goderell’ which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk,[69] whilst others state it derives from “God’s Well”, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship.[70] or else a former ‘Gode Well’ located here[2]
Gough Street – after Richard Gough, wool merchant and local landowner in the early 18th century[71][2]
Granville Square and Granville Street – after Granville Sharp, notable opponent of the slave trade; he was the uncle of Mary Sharp, who married local landowner Thomas Lloyd Baker[72][68]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[72][73]
Great Sutton Street and Sutton Lane – after Thomas Sutton, who founded the nearby Charterhouse School in 1611[72][49]
Green Terrace and Green Yard – possibly after the adjacent Spa Green, or instead John Grene, Clerk to the New River Company in the late 1600s[74]
Gwynne Place – after Nell Gwynne, mistress of Charles II, who lived near here[75][76]
Hardwick Mews and Hardwick Street – after Thomas Lloyd Baker, local landowner, who also owned Hardwicke Court in Gloucester[67][68]
Hayward’s Place – after James Hayward, local 19th century landowner and ironmonger[77][78]
Herbal Hill and Herbal Place – after a former herb garden near here belonging to the Bishops of Ely, former local landowners[79][80]
Hermit Street – after a hermitage established here in 1511 by the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem[81][82]
Holford Mews, Holdford Place and Holford Street – after the Holford family, who worked on the New River) scheme in the 18th century[83][8]
Holsworthy Square –
Ingle Mews and Inglebert Street – after William Inglebert, 17th century engineer who worked on the New River scheme[84][8]
Jerusalem Passage – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem[85][86]
King’s Cross Bridge and Kings Cross Road – after a former statue of George IV that formerly stood near where the train station is now; the Road was formerly called Bagnigge Wells, after a tea garden of that name near here[87][88]
Langton Close – after the Arthur Langton Nurses Home formerly located here[89]
Laystall Street – after a former nearby laystall, a term for a refuse heap[90][91]
Leeke Street – 72
Leo Yard – from the Latin for lion, as it was formerly Red Lion Yard[92]
Lloyd’s Row, Lloyd Square, Lloyd Street and Lloyd Baker Street – after the Lloyd Baker family, local 19th century landowners[93][68]
Lorenzo Street – unknown; formerly York Street[94][95]
Malta Street – unknown, though probably by association with the nearby Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem (also Knights of Malta); formerly Queen Street [96][97]
Manningford Close –
Margery Street – after a family member of local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton; it was formerly Margaret Street[98][4]
Meredith Street – after John Meredith, local landowner and member of the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land[99][100]
Merlin Street – after a former local pub, the New Merlin’s Cave after a local landowner of this name[99][101]
Mount Pleasant – ironically named after a former nearby refuse tip[102][103]
Myddelton Passage, Myddelton Square and Myddelton Street – after Hugh Myddleton, who devised the New River scheme in the early 17th century[104][8]
Mylne Street – after Robert Mylne, who did much engineering work for the New River Company, as did his son William Chadwell Mylne[99][8]
Naoroji Street – after Dadabhai Naoroji, who was active in local politics in the late 19th century[105]
Newcastle Row – after Newcastle House, which formerly stood here; the house was named after its 17th century owner William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle[106]
Northampton Road, Northampton Row and Northampton Square – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton[36][4]
Northburgh Street – after Michael de Northburgh, a bishop who founded the nearby Charterhouse monastery in 1371[36][49]
Owen Street and Owen’s Row – after Dame Alice Owen, who founded almshouses near here in 1609[107][82]
Paget Street – after Sir James Paget, 19th century surgeon, who had a clinic on nearby Friend Street[6][65]
Pakenham Street – after its builder the 3rd Lord Calthorpe, who owned land at Pakenham, Suffolk[6][2]
Pardon Street – after the Pardon Chapel which stood near here in the Middle Ages[108][109]
Pear Tree Court – thought to be from a local pear tree[110][111]
Penton Rise and Pentonville Road – after Henry Penton, who developed this area in the late 18th century[112][113]
Percival Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was a cousin of Spencer Perceval[112][4]
Percy Circus, Percy Yard and Great Percy Street – after Robert Percy Smith, 19th century MP who was a director of the New River Company[112][8]
Phoenix Place and Phoenix Yard – after the former Phoenix Iron Foundry near here[114][115]
Pine Street – Wood Street prior to 1877, probably both names after an avenue of tree that formerly stood here, or possibly after Thomas Wood, 18th century leaseholder[116][117]
Poole’s Buildings –
Prideaux Place – after Arthur R Prideaux, 19th century director of the New River Company[112][8]
Rawstorne Place and Rawstorne Street – after local 18th century bricklayer Thomas Rawstorne[118][82]
Ray Street and Ray Street Bridge – corruption of ‘Rag’, after the former local rag trade here; the streets was formerly two different streets – Hockley in the Hole and Town’s End Lane[118][119]
River Passage, River Street and River Street Mews – after the nearby New River[120][8]
Robert’s Place – probably after Richard Roberts, who built much of the local area in the 1800s[121]
Rosebery Avenue and Rosebery Square – after Archibald Primrose, 5th Earl of Rosebery, 19th century Prime Minister; he was chairman of the London County Council when this street was built in 1889[122][123]
Rosoman Place – after Thomas Rosoman, first manager of the nearby Sadler’s Wells Theatre in the 18th century[122][124]
Sage Way –
St Chad’s Place – after the nearby St Chad’s well, reputed to be a medieval holy well; St Chad was a 7th-century bishop[125][126]
St Helena Street – believed to be named after St Helena, in commemoration of Napoleon’s exile there in 1815[127][128]
St James’s Walk – after the adjacent St James’s Church, Clerkenwell[33]
St John Street and St John’s Square – after the Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem, who set up their English headquarters here in the 12th century[129][86]
Sans Walk – after Edward Sans, named in 1893 as he was then oldest member of the local parish vestry[130][131]
Scotswood Street –
Sebastian Street – after Lewis Sebastian, former Master of the Worshipful Company of Skinners and chairman of the governors of Northampton Polytechnic (now City University)[132][100]
Seddon Street –
Sekforde Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse[132][133]
Sherston Court –
Skinner Street – after the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land when the street was built in the 1810s[134][135]
Soley Mews –
Spafield Street – after a former spa on this site which closed in 1776[136][137]
Spencer Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was cousins with Spencer Perceval[112][4]
Summers Street – 72
Swinton Place and Swinton Street – after local 18th century landowner James Swinton[138][2]
Tompion Street – after 17th century clockmaker Thomas Tompion; formerly called Smith Street [139]
Topham Street – after local strongman Topham the Strong Man, who performed feats of strength here in the 18th century[140][141]
Tysoe Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Tysoe in Northamptonshire[142][4]
Vernon Rise and Vernon Square – after Robert Vernon, 1st Baron Lyveden, 19th century director of the New River Company[112][8]
Vine Hill and Vine Street Bridge – after the vineyards owned by the Bishops of Ely formerly located here[143]
Vineyard Walk – after a former 18th century vineyard on this site[144][143]
Warner Street and Warner Yard – after Robert Warner, local 18th century landowner[145][16]
Wells Square –
Weston Rise – after John Weston, who built this road in the 1790s[146][147]
Wharton Street – unknown[147]
Whiskin Way – after John Whiskin, local landowner/builder in the 19th century[135][99]
White Bear Yard –
Wicklow Street – possibly from Wicklow in Ireland[89]
Wilmington Square and Wilmington Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who also had the title Baron Wilmington[148][4]
Woodbridge Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse; Sekford was born in Woodbridge, Suffolk[132][133]
Wren Street – after prominent architect Sir Christopher Wren[149][150]
Wyclif Street – after John Wycliffe, noted 14th century religious reformer; by association with the former nearby Smithfield Martyrs’ Memorial Church[149][151]
Wynyatt Street – corruption of ‘Wynyates’; after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Compton Wynyates in Northamptonshire[149][4]
Yardley Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was born at Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Fitzrovia. The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of Fitzrovia viz. Euston Road to the north, Tottenham Court Road to the east, Oxford Street to the south and Great Portland Street to the west.

Adam and Eve Court – from the former Adam and Eve tavern near here[1][2]
Bedford Passage – after the Bedford family, local landowners[3]
Berners Mews, Berners Place and Berners Street – after local 17th – 18th century landowners the Berners family[4][5]
Bolsover Street – after local landowners the dukes of Portland, Barons of Bolsover[6][7]
Booth’s Place – after local 18th century landowner Joseph Booth[8][9]
Bourlet Close – after Bourlet’s, fine art agents formerly based here[10]
Bromley Place –
Bywell Place –
Candover Street – after Candover in Hampshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land[11][12]
Carburton Street – after Carburton, Nottinghamshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land[13][14]
Charlotte Mews, Charlotte Place and Charlotte Street – after Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife of King George III[15][16]
Chitty Street – after the Victorian-era local resident and law writer Joseph Chitty[17][18]
Cleveland Mews and Cleveland Street – after Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland, founder of the house of the Fitzroy family, local landowners[15][19]
Clipstone Mews and Clipstone Street – after Clipstone, Nottinghamshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land[13][20]
Colville Place – after its 18th century builder John Colvill (or Colville)[21][22]
Conway Mews and Conway Street – after Isabella FitzRoy, Duchess of Grafton, Baroness Conway, part of the local landowning Fitzroy family[23][24]
Cypress Place – by association with the nearby Maple Street[25]
Eastcastle Street – after the former nearby pub The Castle; it was formerly Little Castle Street[26][27]
Euston Road – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s[28][24]
Evelyn Yard – built by the local Evelyn family in the 18th century[28][29]
Fitzroy Court, Fitzroy Mews, Fitzroy Square and Fitzroy Street – after the Fitzroy family, dukes of Grafton, who owned much of this land[30][24]
Foley Street – after Lord Foley, local resident of the 18th-19th centuries[31][32]
Goodge Place and Goodge Street – after John Goodge, local landowner in the 18th century[33][22]
Gosfield Street – unknown[34]
Grafton Mews and Grafton Way – after local landowners the dukes of Grafton[35][24]
Great Castle Street – after the former nearby pub The Castle[26][36]
Great Portland Street – after the Dukes of Portland, who owned much of this land following the marriage of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland to heiress Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734[37][38]
Great Titchfield Street and Little Titchfield Street – after Titchfield, Hampshire, where local landowners dukes of Portland owned land[39][40]
Greenwell Street – after the locally prominent Greenwell family[41][42]
Gresse Street – built by the Swiss local resident Peter Gaspard Gresse in the 1760s[43][44]
Hanson Street – after a nearby hospital, opening by Lord Mayor Sir Reginald Hanson in 1887[45][46]
Hanway Place and Hanway Street – after Thomas Hanway, commissioner with the navy, who owned this land in the early 18th century[45][46]
Hertford Place – after Isabella FitzRoy, Duchess of Grafton, Marchioness of Hertford, part of the local landowning Fitzroy family[23][24]
Howland Mews East and Howland Street – after Elizabeth Howland, who married Wriothesley Russell, 2nd Duke of Bedford, local landowner[47][48]
Kirkman Place – after local 18th century brewer and property developer Joseph Kirkman[49]
Maple Place and Maple Street – after local Victorian-era councillor John Maple[50][51]
Margaret Court and Margaret Street – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, daughter of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[50][51]
Market Court and Market Place – after the Oxford Market, opened here in 1732[52][53]
Marylebone Passage – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church (1817); the original church was built on the bank of a small stream or “bourne”, called the Tybourne or Tyburn.[54] This stream rose further north in what is now Swiss Cottage, eventually running along what is now Marylebone Lane, which preserves its curve within the grid pattern. The church and the surrounding area later became known as St Mary at the Bourne which, over time, became shortened to its present form, Marylebone.[55][56]
Middleton Place –
Mortimer Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, who inherited the estate via his marriage to Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer in 1713[57][58]
Nassau Street – after the House of Nassau, who had local connections and married into the Georgian royal family[59][60]
New Cavendish Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, Baron Ogle, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[61][62]
Newman Passage, Newman Street and Newman Yard – after Newman Hall in Quendon, Essex, owned by local property owner William Berners[5]
Northcourt – named in 1776 for the Prime Minister Lord North[63]
Ogle Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, Baron Ogle, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[61][64]
Oxford Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer who owned much of the local estate; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch[65][66]
Pearson Square –
Percy Mews, Percy Passage and Percy Street – after either Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland, changing his name from ‘Smithson’ to ‘Percy’ following his marriage to Elizabeth Percy, Duchess of Northumberland, landowner[67] or the Percy Coffee House formerly located here in the 18th century[68]
Queen’s Yard –
Rathbone Place and Rathbone Street – after Thomas Rathbone, local 18th century builder[69][29]
Richardson’s Mews –
Riding House Street – unknown, presumably for a local riding school; it was formerly Riding House Lane[70][71]
St Giles Circus, St Giles High Street and St Giles Passage – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th-century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction[72][73]
Scala Street – after the Scala theatre which formerly stood here[74][75]
Stephen Mews and Stephen Street – after Stephen Lemaistre, business partner of local resident Peter Gaspard Gresse in the 1760s[76][44]
Tottenham Court Road, Tottenham Mews and Tottenham Street – after the former manor of Tottenham (Tottenhall) which stood here from the 13th century, possibly from one local William de Tottenall, or else meaning ‘Tota’s Hall’. The name later became confused with the unconnected Tottenham, Middlesex.[77][78][79]
Warren Mews and Warren Street – after Anne Warren, wife of local 18th century landowner Charles Fitzroy[80][24]
Wells Mews and Wells Street – after Joseph (or George) Wells, local 17th century farmer[81][82]
Whitfield Place and Whitfield Street – after George Whitefield, prominent 18th century religious figure, who founded a tabernacle near here in 1756[83][84]
Windmill Street – after the windmill that formerly stood near here in the 18th century[85][86]
Winsley Street – unknown

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Hatton Garden. Its area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are the generally accepted ones of Clerkenwell Road to the north, Farringdon Road to the east, Holborn and Charterhouse Street to the south and Gray’s Inn road to the west.

Baldwins Gardens – from Richard Baldwin (or Baldwyn), gardener to Queen Elizabeth I and treasurer of the Middle Temple, who owned property in the area in the 16th century[24][25]
Beauchamp Street – from Beauchamp Court, the Warwickshire birthplace of Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, local property owner[26][27]
Black Bull Yard – unknown; this yard has now largely been covered by shop developments and is not accessible to the public
Bleeding Heart Yard – thought to be from the sign of a former pub in this area called the Bleeding Heart[28][29][30]
Brooke Street, Brooke’s Court and Brooke’s Market – after Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[31][27]
Charterhouse Street – Anglicisation of Chartreuse, from Grande Chartreuse, head monastery of the Carthusians in France – a nearby abbey was founded by monks of this order in 1371[32][33]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well), which gave its name to the area to this district[34][35]
Dorrington Street – corruption of ‘Doddington’, from Anne Doddington, wife of Robert Grenville who owned a house near here in the 17th century[36][27]
Ely Court and Ely Place – after the Bishops of Ely, Cambridgeshire who owned much of this area prior to 1659[37][38]
Farringdon Road – from Sir William or Nicholas de Farnedon/Faringdon, local sheriffs or aldermen in the 13th century[39][40][41]
Gray’s Inn Road – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[42][43]
Greville Street – from Fulke Greville, 1st Baron Brooke, who owned a house near here in the 17th century[44][27]
Hatton Garden, Hatton Place and Hatton Wall – from Sir Christopher Hatton, who was ceded much of this area from the Bishops of Ely by Elizabeth I in 1577-1580[45][46]
Holborn – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here[47][48][49][50]
Kirby Street – from Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire[51][46]
Leather Lane – thought to come not from ‘leather’ but from Leofrun, a personal name in Old English; formerly known as Le Vrunelane (13th century), Loverone Lane (14th century) and Liver Lane[52][53]
Leigh Place – from the Barons Leigh, who bought land in the area from the Baldwin family in 1689[24][25]
Lily Place
Onslow Street
Portpool Lane – thought to be a corruption of ‘Purta’s Pool’, the local area is recorded as the manor of Purtepol in the early 13th century;[54][55] written “Purple Lane” in Arlidge’s Survey
Saffron Hill and Saffron Street – these used to be the gardens of the Bishops of Ely, where they grew saffron[56][57]
St Cross Street – originally Cross Street, as it crossed land belonging to the Hatton family; the ‘St’ was added in 1937 to avoid confusion with numerous streets of the same name[58][59]
Verulam Street – from 16th-17th century lawyer, scientist and philosopher Francis Bacon, later created Baron Verulam, who had chambers at Gray’s Inn opposite[60][61]
Viaduct Buildings – after their position directly adjacent to Holborn Viaduct[50]
Waterhouse Square – after Alfred Waterhouse, architect of Holborn Bars, also known as the Prudential Assurance Building, which surrounds the square

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Holborn. Holborn has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are: Theobald’s Road to the north, Gray’s Inn Road and the City of London boundary to the east, Victoria Embankment/the Thames to the south, and Lancaster Place, the north-west curve of the Aldwych semi-circle, Kingsway/Southampton Row to the west.

Streets in the Hatton Garden sub-district are covered in Hatton Garden#Street name etymologies

Aldwych – from Old English ‘Ealdwic’ or ‘Aldwic’, meaning ‘old settlement’, given by Anglo-Saxons referring to a Danish settlement here of the 9th century[1][2][3]
Andrews Crosse – after a former Tudor-era inn here of this name[4]
Arundel Street – after Arundel House which formerly stood on this site[5][6]
Bedford Row – from Peter Harpur of Bedford, a local landowner who laid this street out in the early 18th century[7][8]
Bell Yard – after the Bell Inn, which stood here in the 16th century[7][9]
Bishop’s Court – formerly led to the palace of the Bishop of Chichester, built in the 13th century[10][11]
Brownlow Street – after William Brownlow, who built this street in the 17th century; his family had held land in the area since the 16th century[12][13]
Carey Street – after Nicholas Carey, who lived in this area[14] or Sir George Carey[15]
Catton Street – after the 18th century painter Charles Catton who lived nearby[16][17]
Chancery Lane – the former site of Edward III’s office of the Master of the Rolls of Chancery[18][11]
Chichester Rents – formerly a street of rented houses leading to the palace of Ralph Harris, Bishop of Chichester in the 13th century[19][11]
Clare Market – former site of a butcher’s market on land owned by the John Holles, Earl of Clare who lived nearby[20][21]
Clement’s Inn, Clement’s Inn Passage and Clement’s Lane – after the nearby St Clement Danes church[22][23]
Clerkenwell Road – from a local well (‘the clerk’s well’), which gave its name to the area and to this district[24][23]
Dane Street – from the St Clement Danes church on Aldwych, who own land in the area[25][26]
Devereux Court – from the Devereaux family, earls of Essex, who occupied Essex House on this site in Tudor times[27][28]
Dog and Duck Yard –
Drake Street – thought to be after an early 18th century builder of this name[29]
Eagle Street – named after a local inn here in the 18th century[30][31]
Essex Street and Little Essex Street – former site of a townhouse belonging to the earls of Essex[32][33]
Field Court –
Fisher Street – after Thomas Fisher, a local 16th century landowner[34][35]
Fleet Street – after the now covered river Fleet which flowed near here[36][37]
French Horn Yard – unknown; the entrance to this yard is now covered by development, and though it still exists between nos. 87 and 90 and High Holborn it is no longer generally accessible to the public
Fulwood Place – after Sir George Fulwood, 16th century member of Gray’s Inn[38][39]
Grange Court – thought to a descriptive name dating from the Middle Ages when this was farmland[40]
Gray’s Inn Place, Gray’s Inn Road and Gray’s Inn Square – from Lord Gray of Wilton, owner of a local inn or town house which was later leased to lawyers in the 16th century[41][42]
Great Turnstile, Little Turnstile Street and New Turnstile Gate – after turnstiles that stood here in the 17th century[43][44]
Greyhound Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name[45]
Hand Court – thought to be from a former shop sign advertising gloves or a tailors[46]
High Holborn, Holborn, Holborn Circus and Holborn Place – thought to be from ‘hollow bourne’ i.e. the river Fleet which formerly flowed in a valley near here. The ‘High’ stems from the fact that rode led away from the river to higher ground. Circus is a British term for a road junction.[47][48][49][50]
Houghton Street – after John Holles, Second Baron Houghton, who built the street in the 1650s[51][52]
India Place – after the adjacent Indian High Commission[53]
Jockey’s Fields – thoguht to date from the old custom of the Lord Mayor and retainers on horseback inspecting the nearby conduit on the river Tyburn[54]
Kingsway – named in honour of Edward VII, reigning king when this road was completed in 1906[55][56]
Lamb’s Conduit Passage – after a conduit built by William Lambe in the 16th century to bring clean water from the countryside north of London[57][58]
Lancaster Place – former site of the Savoy Palace. It passed into the ownership of the earls of Lancaster in the 13th century, the most famous of which was John of Gaunt, who owned the palace at the times of its destruction in Peasant’s Revolt of 1381[57][58]
Lincoln’s Inn Fields – after Lincoln’s Inn, the townhouse of the Lacy family, earls of Lincoln, later leased to lawyers in the 14th century[59][60]
Maltraver’s Street – buily on the site of the former Arundel House; one of the 16th century earls of Arundel was Henry Fitzalan who was also Baron Maltravers[61][6]
Melbourne Place – after Melbourne in Australia, as the Australian High Commission in on this site[62]
Milford Lane – origin unknown, though possibly from a Thames mill located on this site in former times[63][64]
Montreal Place – after Montreal in Canada,
Newman’s Row – after Arthur Newman, who built the street in the mid-1600s[65][66]
New Inn Passage – as this formerly led to the New Inn, one of the Inns of Chancery[67]
New Square and New Square Passage – named simply as it was new when first built by Henry Serle[66]
Old North Street – as it leads northwards from Red Lions Square, ‘Old’ so as to contract with New North Street which continues northwards[68][69]
Old Buildings and Old Square – gained this name after the building of New Square in 1682[70]
Portsmouth Street – a house belonging to Louise de Kérouaille, Duchess of Portsmouth, mistress of Charles II, lay on this site [71][72]
Portugal Street – named in honour of Charles II’s Portuguese queen Catherine of Braganza,[71] or possibly after the Portuguese embassy which was formerly located here[72]
Princeton Street – formerly ‘Prince Street’, though after which prince exactly is unknown. It was changed so as to avoid confusion with other Prince Streets.[73][74]
Procter Street – after the 19th century poet Bryan Waller Procter, who lived at Red Lion Square[75][76]
Raymond Buildings – after Lord Chief Justice Raymond, who was called to the bar at Gray’s Inn in 1697[77][78]
Red Lion Square and Red Lion Street – from the 17th century Red Lion Inn, now demolished[79][78]
Remnant Street – after James Farquharson Remnant, 1st Baron Remnant, lawyer at Lincoln’s Inn and latter MP for Holborn[80][81]
River Terrace – presumably as it is a terrace overlooking the river Thames
Sandland Street –
Sardinia Street – after the embassy of the Kingdom of Sardinia and its associated chapel, formerly located on this site[82][83]
Serle Street – after Henry Serle, who built the street in the 1680s[84][85]
Sheffield Street –
Southampton Row – Southampton House, home of the earls of Southampton, formerly stood here in the 16th century[86][87]
South Square – from its location in the south of Gray’s Inn[87]
Star Yard – after the former Starre Tavern here[88]
Stone Buildings –
Strand and Strand Lane – from Old English ‘stond’, meaning the edge of a river; the river Thames formerly reached here prior to the building of the Thames Embankment[89][90]
Surrey Steps and Surrey Street – built on the site of Arundel House, owned by the Howard family who had a branch holding the earldom of Surrey [91][6]
Temple Place – after the nearby Inner Temple and Middle Temple[92]
Theobald’s Road – this road formerly formed part of a route used by Stuart monarchs to their hunting grounds at Theobalds House, Hertfordshire[93][94]
Three Cups Yard – named after a local inn of this name in the 18th century[95]
Tweezer’s Alley –
Twyford Place – after Twyford, Berkshire, home of James Farquharson Remnant, 1st Baron Remnant for whom Remnant Street is named[80][81]
Victoria Embankment – after Queen Victoria, reigning queen at the time of the building of the Thames Embankment[96][97]
Warwick Court – site of the townhouse of Gray’s Inn lawyer Robert Rich, Baron Rich who was created Earl of Warwick in 1618[98]
Water Street – formerly ran to the waterline of the Thames, prior to the building of the Thames Embankment[99][100]
Whetstone Park – built by William Whetstone in 1636[101][102]
Yorkshire Grey Yard – named after a local inn of this name in the 18th century, presumably referring to the breed of horse

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London districts of Kennington and Lambeth. The areas have no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are Westminster Bridge Road/St George’s Circus/London Road to the north, Newington Butts/Kennington Park Road to the east, Kennington Road and Black Prince Road to the south and the river Thames to the west.

Albert Embankment – built in the 1860s over former marshlands, it was named for Albert, Prince Consort, husbands of Queen Victoria [1][2]
Aulton Place –
Austral Street – formerly South Street, both presumably simply descriptive[3]
Barkham Terrace – after Edward Barkham, 8th century benefactor of the Bethlem Royal Hospital[4]
Beaufoy Walk – after local businessmen and philanthropists the Beaufoys [5]
Bedlam Mews – after the Bethlem Royal Hospital, a notorious hospital once located here
Bird Walk –
Bishop’s Terrace –
Black Prince Road – after Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III, who owned this land [6]
Bowden Street – after John Bowden, who bought this land from the Cleavers in 1815 [5]
Brook Drive – after a former brook (stream) here that formed the boundary between local parishes [7]
Carlisle Street –
Castlebrook Close –
Centaur Street – after the mythical creatures, by association with nearby Hercules Street [8]
Chester Way – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall (the Prince of Wales also being Earl of Chester) [9]
China Walk –
Churchyard Row – after the former St Mary’s church located here, destroyed in the Blitz [10]
Cleaver Square and Cleaver Street – after Mary Cleaver, who developed this area in the 1700s [11]
Colnbrook Street –
Cosser Street – after Cosser & Sons, a 19th-century family timber business located near here [12]
Cottington Street – after Francis Cottington, 1st Baron Cottington, 17th century diplomat and politician, who leased land near here[12]; formerly Mansion House Row[13]
Cricketers Court – presumably by connection with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground
Cumberland Mews –
Dante Place and Dante Road – after the Italian poet Dante Alighieri [14]
Denny Crescent and Denny Street – after Rev. Edward Denny, former vicar of St Peter’s Church, Vauxhall [15]
Distin Street –
Dugard Way –
Dumain Court –
Elephant and Castle – derived from a coaching inn of this name[16]
Elliot’s Row –
Falstaff Court –
Fitzalan Street – after Thomas Arundel (FitzAlan), Archbishop of Canterbury in the early 15th century, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [17]
Fives Court –
Garden Row –
Gaywood Street –
George Mathers Road –
Geraldine Street – after the nearby Geraldine Mary Harmsworth Park, named for the mother of 20th century newspaper proprietor Harold Harmsworth, 1st Viscount Rothermere [18]
Gibson Road –
Gilbert Road –
Gladstone Street – after William Ewart Gladstone, Victorian-era Prime Minister [19]
Hamlet Court –
Harmsworth Mews –
Hayles Buildings and Street – after the Hayles family, former local landowner [20]
Hedger Street –
Herald’s Place –
Hercules Road – after Hercules House, built by late 18th century circus owner Philip Astley after one of his favourite circus acts [21]
Holst Court –
Holyoak Road –
Hornbeam Close –
Hotspur Street –
Ingram Close –
Juxon Street – after William Juxon, Archbishop of Canterbury 1660-63, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [22]
Kempsford Road –
Kenneth Court –
Kennings Way – unknown; formerly White Hart Row[23]
Kennington Lane, Kennington, Road and Kennington Park Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); [24][25] another explanation is that it means “place of the King”, or “town of the King”.[26]
King Edward Walk – after Edward VI, who grnated land near here to the City of London [27]
Knight’s Walk –
Lambeth High Street, Lambeth Road and Lambeth Palace Road – refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ‘lamb’ and ‘hythe’. Lambeth Palace is the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury[28][29][30]
Lamlash Street –
Lollard Street – named to commemorate the persecution of the Lollards in the 14th century; it was formerly East Street, after a branch of the local landowning Clayton family [31]
London Road – the road that led to London
Longville Road –
McAuley Close –
Marylee Way –
Mead Row –
Methley Street –
Milverton Street –
Monkton Street –
Morrells Yard –
Morton Place – after John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1486-1500, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [32]
Newington Butts – Newington is now almost obsolete name for the Elephant and Castle area; it means ‘new village/farmstead’ and dates to the early Middle Ages. The ‘Butts’ refers either archery butts[33][34], or just bits of land[35][36][37]
Newnham Terrace – ‘
Newport Street –
Nightingale Mews –
Norfolk Row –
Oakden Street –
Oakey Lane – after J Oakey & Son, owner of a Victorian-era emery paper manufacturers near here [38]
Old Paradise Street – after a former burial ground (‘paradise’) located here [31]
Opal Street – unknown; formerly Pleasant Row[39]
Orient Street – presumably with reference to the other compass-point related streets here
Oswin Street -‘
Othello Close –
Pastor Street –
Penshurst Place –
Polperro Mews – probably after the Cornish town Polperro, as the Duchy of Cornwall formerly owned much of the land here
Portia Court –
Pratt Walk – named by its late 18th century builder Joseph Mawbey for his mother’s family [40]
Princess Street –
Radcot Street –
Ravensdon Street – unknown; formerly Queen’s Row[41]
Reedworth Street –
Renfrew Road –
Rifle Court –
Royal Street – after the former Royal George pub here [42]
Sail Street –
St George’s Circus, St George’s Mews and St George’s Road – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [43]
St Mary’s Gardens – after the parish of St Mary’s, Lambeth [44]
St Olave’s Gardens – after the local parish of Southwark St Olave [45]
Saperton Walk –
Saunders Street –
Seaton Close –
Sidford Place –
Silk Mews –
Stannary Place and Stannary Street – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall, who also owned land around the stannary towns of Cornwall and Devon[46]; Stannary Strete was formerly Kennington Place[47]
Stoughton Close –
Sullivan Road –
Tavy Close –
Temple West Mews – ‘
Upper Marsh –
Virgil Street –
Walcot Square – after Edmund Walcot, 17th century owner of this land [44]
Walnut Tree Walk – after the walnut tress formerly prominent here [48]
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [49]
West Square – after its late 18th century owners the West family [50]
White Hart Street – by connection with local landowner Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III, whose crest was a white hart [51]
Whiteacre Mews –
Whitehorse Mews –
Whitgift Street – after John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [52]
Wigton Place –
Wincott Street – ‘
Windmill Row –

The street around Leicester Square do not neatly fall into one of the surrounding areas and are thus dealt with here for convenience. The boundaries utilised here are: Coventry Street, the northern side of Leicester Square and Cranbourn Street to the north, Charing Cross Road and St Martin’s Place to the east, Trafalgar Square, Charing Cross and Cockspur Street to the south and Haymarket to the west.

Bear Street – unknown, though possibly from a former pub on this street called The Bear, or possibly after Augustine Beare, a glazier who worked near here[167][168] or perhaps the heraldic device of the Earls of Leicester [169]
Charing Cross and Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames [170] [171][172]
Cockspur Street – unknown, though possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights[47]
Coventry Street – after Henry Coventry, Secretary of State to Charles II, who lived near here in Shaver’s Hall [173][174]
Cranbourn Alley and Cranbourn Street – built in the 1670s and named after local landowner the Earl of Salisbury, Viscount Cranbourn (or Cranbourne) after the town in Dorset [175][51]
Excel Court – after Excel House, 1930s office block located here [176]
Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s [177][169][178]
Hobhouse Court – after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron [179]
Hunt’s Court – after Samuel Hunt, local carpenter and leaseholder in the 17th century [180]
Irving Street – after Henry Irving, popular Victorian actor; the street was originally named Green Street, as it led to a bowling green near Leicester Square [181][182]
Leicester Square – the square was home to Leicester House in the 17th century, home of Robert Sidney, 2nd Earl of Leicester; Leicester Court was formerly Ryder Court, after local leaseholder Richard Ryder – it was renamed in 1936 [183][184]
Long’s Court –
Orange Street – after the William III, Prince of Orange, reigning king when thus street was built. The western section between Haymarket and St Martin’s Street was formerly called James Street, after James II [185]
Oxendon Street – after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby [186][187]
Pall Mall East – laid out as a grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century [188][189]
Panton Street – after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century [190][191]
St Martin’s Place and St Martin’s Street – both named after St Martin-in-the-Fields church [192][193]
Shaver’s Place – after Simon Osbaldeston, who built a gaming house here in the early 17th century. As Osbaldeston was formerly barber to Lord Chamberlain, local wits coined this name in jest at the ‘shaving’ going on at the games house [194][195]
Suffolk Place and Suffolk Street – after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site [196][147]
Swiss Court – after the Swiss Centre that formerly stood here
Trafalgar Square – in commemoration of Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar [197][198]
Whitcomb Court and Whitcomb Street – after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Lisson Grove. The area has no formally defined boundaries, however the following utilises the generally accepted ones of St John’s Wood Road to the north, Park Road and Baker Street to the east, Marylebone Road to the south and Edgware Road/Maida Vale to the west.

Aberdeen Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for the Earl of Aberdeen, a governor of the school in the 1820s [1] [2]
Alpha Close – after the Greek letter, as this was at one point the first street to be developed in this area (in 1799) [3]
Ashbridge Street – after Arthur Ashbridge, District Surveyor for Marylebone 1884–1918; formerly Exeter Street [4] [5]
Ashmill Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Ash Mill in Devon where they owned land; it was formerly Devonshire Street, but was later changed to avoid confusion with similarly named streets [6][7]
Baker Street – after Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the Portman family [8] [9]
Balcombe Street – possibly a corruption of Batcombe, Dorset, in line with other Dorset-related street names near here [10]
Bedlow Close –
Bell Street – formerly Bell Lane, it runs through the former Bell Field, possibly named for a former inn of this name on Edgware Road [11][12]
Bendall Mews – after Sir Talbot Hastings Bendall Baker, brother of Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the Portman family [13][9]
Bernhardt Crescent –
Blandford Square – after Blandford Forum, Dorset, where the local Portman family had a seat [14] [10]
Boldero Place – as this area was formerly home to the warehouses of the firm Spencer, Turner & Boldero [15]
Boscobel Street – after a former inn here called The Royal Oak, by association with Charles II who hid from Parliamentary forces in the Royal Oak at Boscobel House [16][17]
Boston Place – the land here was formerly called Boston Field [16][17]
Broadley Street and Broadley Terrace – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Broadley Wood, Dorset where they owned land; it was formerly Earl Street [18][10]
Burne Street – after one Mr Burne, who purchased land here in 1792 [19]
Capland Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Capland, Somerset where they owned land [20][10]
Casey Close –
Chagford Street – after the stannary town Chagford, Devon; this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate and Edward Portman, 1st Viscount Portman was Lord Warden of the Stannaries 1865–88 [21] [22]
Church Street – after the nearby St Mary on Paddington Green Church [23] [24]
Clifton Court – possibly after Clifton, Bristol [25]
Corlett Street – probably after Hubert C Corlette, Victorian-era artist and local resident [26]
Cosway Street – after Richard Cosway, Regency-era painter [27][28]
Cunningham Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for Reverend John William Cunningham, a governor of the school in the 1810s [1][2]
Daventry Street – unknown [29]
Dorset Close and Dorset Square – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Dorset where they owned land [30][31]
Edgware Road – as it leads to Edgware, Middlesex [32][33]
Fisherton Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named after Fisherton, Salisbury, Wiltshire, by association with the Earls of Salisbury [34][35]
Frampton Street – after the sculptor and local resident George Frampton [36] [37]
Gateforth Street – possibly for Gateforth in Yorkshire, though why this named was chosen (in 1914) in unknown [38]
George Peabody Court – after George Peabody, American philanthropist
Glentworth Street – after Edmund Pery, 1st Earl of Limerick (Lord Glentworth), 18th – 19th century politician and local resident [39] [40]
Great Central Street – after the adjacent Marylebone railway station, originally the terminus of the Great Central Railway [41]
Grendon Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named for Walter Grendon, Grand Prior 1400–16 [42]
Grove Gardens –
Harewood Avenue and Harewood Row – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Emma Portman, Viscountess Portman, daughter of Henry Lascelles, 2nd Earl of Harewood, wife of Edward Portman, 1st Viscount Portman [43][44]
Harrow Street – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School
Hatton Row and Hatton Street – thought to be after a local builder of this name [45]
Hayes Place – after the developer of this street Francis Hay, who lived in Hayes, Middlesex [46] [47]
Henderson Drive –
Highworth Street –
Huntsworth Mews – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Huntsworth, Somerset where they owned land [20][10]
Ivor Place – unknown; formerly Upper Park Place [48]
Jerome Crescent –
Lilestone Street – after the former manor of Lilestone which covered this area [49]
Linhope Street – unknown [50]
Lisson Grove and Lisson Street – corruption of Lilestone, the former manor which covered this area, probably after a personal name (i.e. the Saxon Lille) [51] [52]
Lodge Road – as it leads to the Hanover Lodge in Regent’s Park [53]
Lorne Close – after the John Campbell, 9th Duke of Argyll (the Marquess of Lorne), husband of Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, daughter of Queen Victoria [54]
Luton Street – unknown [2]
Lyons Place – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for the school’s founder John Lyon [55] [2]
Maida Vale – took its name from a public house named after John Stuart, Count of Maida, which opened on the Edgware Road soon after the Battle of Maida in 1806 [56][57][58][59]
Mallory Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named Robert Mallory, Grand Prior 1433–40 [60]
Melcombe Place and Melcombe Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Melcombe, Somerset where they owned land [61][10]
Miles Place –
Mulready Street – after 18th – 19th century artist William Mulready [62] [63]
North Bank – after a former crescent of villas of this name, demolished to build the adjacent railway lines in the 1890s [64]
Northwick Close and Northwick Terrace – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for John Rushout, 2nd Baron Northwick, a governor of the school in the 1800s [65] [2]
Oak Tree Road – after former land nearby called Oak Tree Field [66] [67]
Orchardson Street – after Victorian era artist and local resident William Quiller Orchardson [68] [69]
Palgrave Gardens –
Park Road – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [70]
Paveley Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named either for Richard de Paveley (Grand Prior 1315–21) or John de Paveley (Grand Prior 1358–71) [71]
Penfold Place and Penfold Street – after Reverend George Penfold, vicar of several local churches in the early 1800s [72][73]
Plympton Place and Plympton Street – unknown; formerly Little Grove Street [74]
Pollitt Drive –
Portman Gate – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate [10]
Ranston Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Ranston, Dorset [13][9]
Rossmore Close and Rossmore Road – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; they owned a property called Rossmore [75][10]
St John’s Wood Road – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem [76] [77]
Salisbury Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named for the Earls of Salisbury [78] [79]
Samford Street – unknown [79]
Shroton Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Shroton, Dorset [13][9]
Siddons Lane – after 19th century actress Sarah Siddons, who lived nearby at Clarence Gate [13] [80]
Stalbridge Street – for the Baker family, assistants of local landowners the Portmans, who owned land in Stalbridge, Dorset [13][9]
Swain Street –
Taunton Mews and Taunton Place – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Taunton, Somerset where they owned land [81][10]
Tresham Crescent – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named for Thomas Tresham, Grand Prior 1557–59 [82]
Venables Street – named for Revered Edward Veneable, vicar of the nearby Christ Church, Bell Street [83][84]
Victoria Passage –
Whitehaven Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named for the Earls of Carlise and was originally Little Carlisle Street, later changed after Whitehaven, Cumberland

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Marylebone. The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of Marylebone viz. Marylebone Road to the north, Great Portland Street to the east, Marble Arch and Oxford Street to the south and Edgware Road to the west.

Aldburgh Mews –
All Soul’s Place – after the adjacent All Souls Place[1]
Ashland Place – thought to be a Victorian-era alteration of its former name Burying Ground Passage, after the adjacent St Marylebone Parish Church[2]
Aybrook Street – roughly follows the path of the former Aye (or Eye Brook)[3][4]
Baker’s Mews and Baker Street – after Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the Portman family[5][6]
Barrett Street – after Thomas Barret, local 18th century landowner[7][8]
Beaumont Mews and Beaumont Street – after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century[9][10]
Bentinck Mews and Bentinck Street – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who inherited the local estate after marrying Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734[11][12]
Berkeley Mews and Upper Berkeley Street – after Henry William Berkeley, who inherited the local Portman estate via his mother[13][14]
Beverston Mews –
Bingham Place – after Bingham in Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property[15][16]
Bird Street – after Thomas Bird, local 18th century bricklayer[17][16]
Blandford Street – after Blandford Forum, Dorset, where the local Portman family had a seat[18][8][19]
Bourne Mews –
Brendon Street – unknown[20]
Bridford Mews – after Bridford in Devon, by association with the nearby Devonshire Street[21][22]
Broadstone Place – after Broadstone, Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property[23][19]
Brown Street – named after Mr Brown, local 19th century builder[24][25]
Browning Mews – after the poet Robert Browning, who married local resident Elizabeth Barret[25]
Brunswick Mews – after the Brunswick Chapel, formerly located near here on Upper Berkeley Street[25]
Bryanston Mews East, Bryanston Mews West, Bryanston Place, Bryanston Square and Bryanston Street – after Bryanston in Dorset, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property[26][27]
Bulstrode Place and Bulstrode Street – after local landowners the Bentinck family, who also owned land at Bulstrode Park in Buckinghamshire[28][29]
Cabbell Street – after George Cabbell, local landowner in the 1790s[30][31]
Castlereagh Street – after Robert Stewart, 2nd Marquess of Londonderry, Lord Castlereagh, prominent politician of the 17th – 18th centuries[32][33]
Cato Street – named by landowner John Harcourt, in allusion to the Roman Cato; it was changed for a period to Horace Street (after the Roman poet) owing to the notoriety of the Cato Street conspiracy, but the original name was restored[34][35]
Cavendish Mews North, Cavendish Mews South, Cavendish Place, Cavendish Square, Cavendish Street, New Cavendish Street and Old Cavendish Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner[36][37]
Chandos Street – after the Duke of Chandos, who built a mansion nearby in the 1710s[38][39]
Chapel Place – after the nearby St Peter, Vere Street church, formerly a chapel of ease[38][40]
Chapel Street – after a former chapel on this site, opened 1772, closed in the 1850s[38][40]
Chiltern Street – after the nearby Marylebone station, from where train to the Chiltern Hills of Buckinghamshire depart[41]
Circus Mews – the street to which it adjoins, Enford Street, was formerly supposed to lead to a circus (Junction), however it was never built[42][43]
Clarke’s Mews – after William Clarke, local 18th century landowner[44][45]
Clenston Mews – after Winterborne Clenston in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land[18][19]
Cramer Street – after the violinist Wilhelm Cramer, who lived near here[46][47]
Crawford Mews, Crawford Place and Crawford Street – after Tarrant Crawford in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land[18][19]
Cross Keys Close – after the former Cross Keys tavern here, named for local 18th century street developer Philip Keys[48]
David Mews – after David Porter, builder of the nearby Montagu Square[49]
Dean’s Mews – thought to be for a Catholic college formerly located here [50]
Devonshire Close, Devonshire Mews North, Devonshire Mews South, Devonshire Mews West, Devonshire Place, Devonshire Place Mews, Devonshire Row Mews and Devonshire Street – after local landowner the Cavendish family, who had a branch which became the dukes of Devonshire[51][37]
De Walden Street – after Baroness Howard de Walden, local landowner[51][52]
Dorset Street – after Dorset, where the local Portman family owned much land[18][53]
Duchess Mews and Duchess Street – by association with the dukes and duchesses of Portland, local landowners, possibly specifically Dorothy Duchess of Portland[54][55]
Duke’s Mews and Duke Street – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates[56]
Dunstable Mews – unknown; prior to 1935 it was Upper Wimpole Mews[57]
Durweston Street – after Durweston, Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land[18][19]
Easleys Mews – after Abraham Easley, 18th century landowner[58][59]
Edgware Road – as it leads to Edgware, Middlesex[60][61]
Edwards Mews – after Edward Gray, local 18th century leaseholder[62]
Enford Street – after Enford, Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land; the street was formerly known as Circus Street[18][19]
Fitzhardinge Street – after Viscount Fitzhardinge, relative of Henry William Berkeley, local landowner[13][19]
Forset Street – after Edward Forset (or Forsett), surveyor with the department of works, who owned land here in the 16th – 17th century[63][64]
Garbutt Place – named in 1894 after William Garbutt, local vestry clerk and later borough town clerk[65][66]
Gee’s Court – ‘
George Street – after king George III, reigning king when the street was built[67][68]
Gildea Street –
Gloucester Place and Gloucester Place Mews – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, Duke of Gloucester, son of King George II[69][70]
Granville Place – probably after Granville George Leveson-Gower, 2nd Earl Granville, prominent Victorian politician[71][72]
Gray’s Yard – after Edward Gray, local leaseholder of the 18th century[71][62]
Great Castle Street – after the former nearby pub The Castle[73][74]
Great Cumberland Mews and Great Cumberland Place – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, son of King George II; it was formerly Tyburn Gate, after the brook that ran here[75][76]
Grotto Passage – site of a former shell grotto owned by John Castle, closed circa 1760[77][78]
Hallam Mews and Hallam Street – after Henry Hallam, 19th century historian who lived nearby[79][80]
Hampden Gurney Street – after Reverend John Hampden Gurney, rector of St Mary’s, Bryanston Square in the mid-19th century[81][82]
Harcourt Street – after John Harcourt, local landowner and resident in the 18th century[83][84]
Harley Place and Harley Street – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, Lady Margaret Harley, wife of the duke of Portman, landowner[85][86]
Harrowby Street – after Dudley Ryder, 1st Earl of Harrowby, early 19th century politician, by association with the Cato Street conspiracy at which he would have been killed had it succeeded[87][35]
Henrietta Place – after Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, daughter of Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne[88][89]
Hinde Mews and Hinde Street – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer[90][91]
Holles Street – after John Holles, 1st Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, who bought the local estate in 1708[90][92]
Homer Row and Homer Street – named by local landowner John Harcourt, either in honour of the ancient Greek poet Homer or his neighbour Edward Homer, possibly both[34][93]
Jacob’s Well Mews – after Jacob Hinde, husband of Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer[90][91]
James Street – unknown[94]
Jason’s Court –
John Prince’s Street – after John Prince, surveyor to the Cavendish-Harley estate in the 1710s[95][96]
Kendall Place – after William Kendall, local builder and timber merchant in the 18th century[97][98]
Kenrick Place – after William Kenrick, local lecturer and writer in the 18th century[99][98]
Knox Street – unknown[100]
Langham Place and Langham Street – after Sir James Langham, who owned a house near here in the early 19th century[101][102]
Luxborough Street – unknown[103]
Manchester Mews, Manchester Square and Manchester Street – after Manchester House (now Hertford House) which stood here, home to the dukes of Manchester, built 1776[104][105]
Mandeville Place – after the duke of Manchester as above, also known as Viscount Mandeville[106][105]
Mansfield Mews and Mansfield Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[107][105]
Marble Arch – after the Marble Arch erected here in 1851[108]
Margaret Street – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, daughter of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[109][108]
Marylebone High Street, Marylebone Lane, Marylebone Mews, Marylebone Road, Marylebone Street and Old Marylebone Road – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church (1817); the original church was built on the bank of a small stream or “bourne”, called the Tybourne or Tyburn.[110] This stream rose further north in what is now Swiss Cottage, eventually running along what is now Marylebone Lane, which preserves its curve within the grid pattern. The church and the surrounding area later became known as St Mary at the Bourne which, over time, became shortened to its present form, Marylebone.[111][112]
Molyneux Street – presumably after Molyneux Shuldham, 18th century naval officer[113][114]
Montagu Mews North, Montagu Mews South, Montague Mews West, Montagu Place, Montagu Square, Montagu Street and Upper Montagu Street – after Montagu House which formerly stood near here and was home to prominent 18th century figure Elizabeth Montagu[115][49]
Mortimer Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, who inherited the estate via his marriage to Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer in 1713[113][116]
Moxon Street – after the former Moxon apartment block on this street; prior to 1936 it was ‘Paradise Street’, after an old burial ground near here – it was changed to avoid confusion with other streets of this name[117][118]
Nottingham Place and Nottingham Street – after Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property[15][119]
Nutford Place – after Nutford in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land[18][19]
Oldbury Place – unknown[120]
Orchard Street – after Orchard Portman in Somerset, where the local Portman family owned property[18][121]
Ossington Buildings – after Charlotte, Viscountess Ossington, local landowner and heiress to the Cavendish-Harley estate[122][123]
Oxford Circus and Oxford Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer who owned much of the local estate; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was formerly Regent Circus, after Regent Street[124][125]
Paddington Street – this was on old path leading to Paddington[126][125]
Park Crescent, Park Crescent Mews East and Park Crescent Mews West – as they are adjacent to Regent’s Park[127]
Picton Place – after Thomas Picton, general who lived near here before his death at the Battle of Waterloo[128][129]
Portman Close, Portman Mews South, Portman Square and Portman Street – after the Portman family who owned this estate since William Portman acquired it in the 16th century; he was originally from Orchard Portman, Somerset[130][131][19]
Portland Place, Great Portland Street and Little Portland Street – after the Dukes of Portland, who owned much of this land following the marriage of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland to heiress Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland in 1734[130][19]
Porter Street – after David Porter, builder of the nearby Montagu Square[49]
Quebec Mews, New Quebec Street and Old Quebec Street – after the former Quebec Chapel on this site, named after the Battle of Quebec, built 1787 demolished in 1912[132][120]
Queen Anne Mews and Queen Anne Street – after Queen Anne; it was originally meant to lead to a square called Queen Anne Square, however this was never completed[133][134]
Regent Street – made in the 1810s by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent, later George IV[135][136]
Riding House Street – unknown, presumably for a local riding school; it was formerly Riding House Lane[137][138]
Robert Adam Street – after Robert Adam, 18th century architect; originally it was just Adams Street, after 18th century developer Samuel Adams[139][138]
Romney Mews –
St Christopher’s Place – Octavia Hill, social reformer, cleared the slums of this area and named it in honour of St Christopher; formerly it was Barrett’s Court, after Thomas Barret, local 18th century landowner[140][141]
St Vincent Street – after the nearby school founded by the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul[142][143]
Salisbury Place – after the Salisbury brothers (Isaac, John and Thomas), local 18th century builders[142][144]
Seymour Mews, Seymour Place and Seymour Street – after Anne Seymour, mother of Henry William Portman, and through whom he inherited the estate[145][146]
Sherlock Mews – after the fictional detective Sherlock Holmes, who lived on Baker Street[147][148]
Shillibeer Place – after George Shillibeer, owner of a local coaching business in the 19th century[147][114]
Shouldham Street – after Molyneux Shuldham, 18th century naval officer[113][114]
Spanish Place – nearby Hertford House on Manchester Square was formerly home to the Spanish ambassador[149][150]
Stratford Place – after Edward Stratford, who owned a house nearby and built this street in the 1770s[151][62]
Stourcliffe Street –
Tarrant Place – probably after Tarrant Crawford in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land[18]
Thayer Street – after Anne Thayer, who inherited this land from her father Thomas Thayer; the street was built in the 1770s by her husband Jacob Hinde[152][91]
Thornton Place – after Sophia Thornton, mother of Ronald Leslie-Melville, 11th Earl of Leven; the earl married Emma Selina Portman, whose brother Gerald Berkeley Portman, 7th Viscount Portman named this street in her honour[153][19]
Transept Street – after a former chapel on this site, opened 1772, closed in the 1850s[38],or possibly after the former cross shape created by this street crossing Chapel Street[154]
Vere Street – named by the Harley family, earls of Oxford in honour of the De Vere family, who had held the earldom from 1155 until 1703 when the 20th earl died without issue[155][156]
Virgil Place – named by landowner John Harcourt, in allusion to the Roman poet Virgil[34][157]
Walmer Place and Walmer Street –
Watson’s Mews – after John Watson, local 18th century leaseholder[158][84]
Welbeck Street and Welbeck Way – after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland[158][159]
Wesley Street – after Charles Wesley, hymn author, who is buried nearby[160][161]
Westmorland Street – unknown[162]
Weymouth Mews and Weymouth Street – after Lady Elizabeth Bentinck, Viscountess Weymouth, daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who owned this estate[163][162]
Wheatley Street – after Francis Wheatley, Victorian artist who lived in the area[163][162]
Wigmore Place and Wigmore Street – after Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[164][116]
Wimpole Mews, Wimpole Street and Upper Wimpole Street – after Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer[164][165]
Woodstock Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, Viscount Woodstock[166][167]
Wyndham Mews, Wyndham Street and Wyndham Yard – after Anne Wyndham, wife of local landowner Henry Portman[168][169]
Wythburn Place – after Wythburn Fells, Cumberland, by association with the nearby Great Cumberland Place[168][169]
York Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of King George IV

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Mayfair, in the City of Westminster. It utilises the generally accepted boundaries of Mayfair viz. Marble Arch/Cumberland Gate and Oxford Street to the north, Regent Street to the east, Piccadilly to the south and Park Lane to the west.

Achilles Way – after the nearby Wellington as Achilles statue in Hyde Park{{sfn|Bebbington|1972|p15}
Adam’s Row – believed to be after John Adams, local land agent in the 18th century[1][2]
Air Street – believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century[3][4]
Albany and Albany Courtyard – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site[3][4]
Albemarle Street – after the Christopher Monck, 2nd Duke of Albemarle, owner of Clarendon House which stood on this site in the late 17th century[3][5]
Aldford Street – after Aldford, a property on the Grosvenor family’s Cheshire estates; it was formerly known as Chapel Street before 1886, as it led to the Grosvenor Chapel[6][7]
Archibald Mews – unknown; it was formerly John Court, after local landowner John, Lord Berkeley [8]
Audley Square, North Audley Street and South Audley Street – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors’ ownership[9][10]
Avery Row – after Henry Avery, 18th century bricklayer who built this street over the Tyburn Brook[11], or possibly after Ebury, the ancient manor here[12]
Balderton Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors, who also owned land in Balderton, Cheshire; formerly George Street [13][14]
Balfour Mews and Balfour Place – after Eustace Balfour, surveyor for the Grosvenor estate 1890 – 1910[15]
Barlow Place – after either Thomas Barlow, builder and surveyor for the Grosvenor estate in the early 18th century[16] or Arthur Balfour, politician and later Prime Minister in the early 20th century[17]
Berkeley Square and Berkeley Street – Berkeley House formerly stood here, home of John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton in the late 17th century[18][19]
Binney Street – after Reverend Thomas Binney, local 19th century minister; formerly called Bird Street[20][21][22]
Blenheim Street – after Blenheim Palace, owned by John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general[23][24]
Blackburne’s Mews – after William Blackburne, local resident in the early 18th century[25][26]
Bloomfield Place – John Newson, who built the adjacent Bloomfield Flats, named them for his wife’s maiden name [27]
Bolton Street – after Charles Powlett, Duke of Bolton, who owned this land when the street was built in 1699[28][29]
Bourdon Place and Bourdon Street – after the former Bourdon House, home of the Bourdon/Burden family in the early 18th century[30][31]
Boyle Street – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, local landowner in the 18th century[32][33]
Brick Street – this area was formerly a set of fields used for digging brick-earth[34][35]
Broadbent Street – after William Broadbent, physician to the royal family in the Victorian and Edwardian period, who lived nearby[36][37]
Brook Gate, Brook Street, Brook’s Mews and Upper Brook Street – Brook Street marks the path of the former Tyburn Brook[38][39]
Brown Hart Gardens – this was formerly two streets prior to 1936 – Brown Street, after 18th century local bricklayer John Brown, and Hart Street, probably after a local inn or resident[40][41]
Bruton Lane, Bruton Place and Bruton Street – after Bruton, Somerset, where John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton owned land[42][19]
Burlington Arcade, Burlington Gardens, New Burlington Mews, New Burlington Place, New Burlington Street and Old Burlington Street – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington[43][44]
Carlos Place – after Carlos I of Portugal; it was formerly Charles Street but was renamed in 1886 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name[45][46]
Carpenter Street –
Carrington Street – after 18th century local landowner Nathan Carrington[47][48]
Charles Street – after a Charles in the family of John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton[49][19]
Chesterfield Gardens, Chesterfield Hill and Chesterfield Street – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century[50][51]
Clarges Mews and Clarges Street – after William (or Thomas) Clarges, local landowner in the 17th century[52][53]
Clifford Street – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington]], also Baron Clifford, after his ancestor Elizabeth Clifford[54][55]
Coach and Horses Yard – after the Burlington Arms pub here, formerly the Coach and Horses[56][57]
Conduit Street – after a former water conduit here leading to the City and owned by the Corporation of London from the 15th century[58][59]
Cork Street and Cork Street Mews – after Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington]], also 4th Earl of Cork[60][61]
Culross Street – thought to be after Culross in Fife; prior to 1899 it was Northrop Street, after a Welsh property owned by the Grosvenor family[62]
Cumberland Gate – after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland, brother of George III; it was formerly Tyburn Gate, after the Tyburn Brook[62][63]
Curzon Gate, Curzon Square and Curzon Street – after Nathaniel Curzon (and his family), local landowner in the 18th century[64][65]
Davies Mews and Davies Street – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors’ ownership[66][67]
Deanery Mews and Deanery Street – this land was owned by Westminster Abbey in the 18th century; it was formerly known as Dean and Chapter Street[66][68]
Derby Street – after Derbyshire, home county of local landowners the Curzon family[69][65]
Dering Street and Dering Yard – unknown[70]
Down Street and Down Street Mews – after John Downes, local bricklayer in the 18th century[71][72]
Dover Street and Dover Yard – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Baron Dover, local leaseholder in the late 17th century[71][73]
Duke Street and Duke Yard – it is unknown precisely which duke, if any, this street commemorates[74]
Dunraven Street – after Windham Thomas Wyndham-Quin, 4th Earl of Dunraven and Mount-Earl, politician and soldier who lived near here[75][76]
Farm Street – this street was formerly part of Hay Hill farm[77][78]
Fitzmaurice Place – after John FitzMaurice, father of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne who lived near here in the 18th century[79][80]
George Yard – probably after John George, local 18th century glazier and builder[81][82]
Gilbert Street – unknown; formerly James Street [83][84]
Globe Yard –
Grafton Street – after the Dukes of Grafton, who owned a town house near here in the 18th century[85][86]
Grantham Place – after John (or Thomas) Grantham, local builder in the 18th century[87][88]
Green Street – after John Green, local builder of the 18th century[89][90]
Grosvenor Gate, Grosvenor Hill, Grosvenor Square, Grosvenor Street and Upper Grosvenor Street – after the Grosvenors, former local landowners [10]
Half Moon Street – after a former inn near here of this name[91][92]
Hamilton Mews and Hamilton Place – built on land belonging to Mr Hamilton, ranger of Hyde Park during the reign King Charles II[93][94]
Hanover Square and Hanover Street – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713[95][96]
Harewood Place – after Ahrwood House, residence of the Earls of Harewood in the 19th century [97]
Haunch of Venison Yard – after a former 18th century inn near here[98][99]
Hay Hill, Hay’s Mews and Hill Street – after the Hay Hill farm which formerly stood here; the farm was originally ‘Aye farm’, after the nearby Aye Brook[100][99]
Heddon Street – after William Pulteney (later also Baron Heddon), local 18th century landowner[101][102]
Hertford Street – after a former local inn named after the Seymours, Marquesses of Hertford[103][104]
Jervis Court –
Jones Street – after William Jones, yeoman, who leased a large plot here in 1723 [105]
Lancashire Court –
Lansdowne Row – former site of Lansdowne House, home of William Petty, 1st Marquess of Lansdowne in the 18th century[79][106]
Lees Place – after either Robert Lee (or Lees), owner of the Two Chairman pub which formerly stood here[107] or one Thomas Barrett of Lee, Kent, 19th century builder[108]
Lumley Street – after Sibell Lumley, wife of Victor, Earl Grosvenor, local landowner[109][110]
Lynsey Way –
Maddox Street – after the local Maddox estate, purchased by William Maddox in the 1620s[111][112]
Marble Arch – after the Marble Arch erected here in 1851 [113]
Market Mews – after the former Shepherd Market near here [114]
Mason’s Arms Mews – after the nearby Mason’s Arms pub [115]
Mayfair Place – after the May Fair that was formerly held here in the 17th – 18th centuries [116]
Mill Street – after a windmill that formerly stood here next to the Tyburn brook[117][118]
Mount Row, Mount Street and Mount Street Mews – built over the former Mount Field, from the former Oliver’s Mount fortification built here by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War[119][120]
New Bond Street, Old Bond Street and Upper Bond Street – after Thomas Bond, member of the consortium that developed the local area in the late 17th century; ‘New’ comes from the extension of the then ‘Bond Street’ northwards in the early 18th century[43][121]
North Row – after its location as the northern-most street on the Grosvenor estate[122][123]
Oxford Circus and Oxford Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer who owned much of the local estate; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was formerly Regent Circus, after Regent Street[124][125]
Park Lane, Old Park Lane and Park Street – after the nearby Hyde Park; Park Lane was formerly Tyburn Lane, after the Tyburn gibbet and stream, and Park Street was formerly Hyde Park Street[126][127]
Piccadilly, Piccadilly Circus and Piccadilly Place – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was laid out by John Nash in 1819[128][129]
Pitt’s Head Mews – after a former pub on this site called the Pitt’s Head, thought to be name after William Pitt the Elder[130][131]
Pollen Street – after the Pollen family, who inherited the estate from the Maddox family[132][112]
Princes Street – named in a generic sense in honour of the then reigning House of Hanover[133][96]
Providence Court – unknown[134]
Queen Street – when it was built in 1735 there was no reigning queen, so to which queen it refers, if any, is unknown[135][136]
Red Lion Yard –
Red Place – coined in Victorian times after the colour of the local buildings[137][138]
Reeves Mews – after Spelsant Reeves, local leaseholder in the 18th century[137][139]
Regent Street – made in the 1810s by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent, later George IV[137][140]
Rex Place – formerly King’s Mews, it was renamed after the Latin term for ‘king’[141][142]
Royal Arcade – after Queen Victoria, who visited this arcade[143]
Sackville Street – after Captain Edward Sackville, tenant of a house on the west side of the street in 1675; it was formerly known as Stone Conduit Close [144][145]
Saddle Yard –
St Anselm’s Place – former site of St Anselm’s church, demolished 1938[146][147]
St George Street – originally George Street, after George I, reigning monarch when the street was built; the ‘St’ was later added to link it to the nearby St George’s church[148][149]
Savile Row – after Dorothy Savile, Countess of Burlington and Countess of Cork, wife of Richard Boyle, 3rd Earl of Burlington, local landowner[150][151][152]
Sedley Place – named after Angelo Sedley, local 19th century furniture salesman[153][154]
Shepherd Close, Shepherd Market, Shepherd Place and Shepherd Street – after Edward Shepherd, local builder in the 18th century; Shepherd Place was built by his brother John Shepherd[155][114]
South Molton Lane and South Molton Street – unknown; South Molton Lane was formerly Poverty Lane[156]
South Street – after its location as the southern-most street on the Grosvenor estate[156]
Stafford Street – after Margaret Stafford, local leaseholder in the late 17th century[157][158]
Stanhope Gate and Stanhope Row – after Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield, who owned a mansion nearby in the 18th century[159][51]
Stratton Street – after John Berkeley, 3rd Baron Berkeley of Stratton, local resident in the late 17th century[160][19]
Swallow Passage, Swallow Place and Swallow Street – after a field on this site owned by Thomas Swallow in the 1530s[161][162]
Tenterden Street – unknown[163]
Three Kings Yard – after a nearby inn, demolished 1879[164][165]
Tilney Street – after either John Tilney (or Tylney), who was granted this land in the 18th century[166] or Ann Tilney, 18th century property owner; it was formerly Tripe Yard, after the butchery trade here[167]
Trebeck Street – after Reverend Trebeck, former rector of St George’s on Hanover Square in the 18th century[166][168]
Tyburn Way – formerly the site of the Tyburn gallows, itself named after a deserted hamlet called Tiburne in the Domesday Book, meaning ‘boundary stream’[169][170]
Union Yard –
Vigo Street – after either the British victory at the Battle of Vigo Bay in 1702[171][172][173] or the capture of a Spanish vessel of this name in 1719[174]
Vine Street – after The Vine, an 18th-century public house,[175] which in turn may have been named after a vineyard that existed at this location in Roman times[176]
Waverton Street – after Waverton, Cheshire, where local landowners the Grosvenors also held land[177][14]
Weighhouse Street – after the King’s Weigh House Chapel, which moved here its site above the King’s Weight House in the City in 1891; before this it was known as Robert Street, after Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, and before that as Chandler Street after the local chandler trade[177][22]
White Horse Street – after a former inn of this name at this site, named for the Royal emblem of the House of Hanover[178][179]
Wood’s Mews – after Richard Wood, who built this street in 1731[23][180]
Woodstock Street – after either Woodstock, Oxfordshire, location of to Blenheim Palace, home of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general[23] or Thomas Woodstock, 18th century builder[180]
Yarmouth Place – after Francis Charles Seymour-Conway, 3rd Marquess of Hertford, Earl of Yarmouth who lived near here in the 19th century

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London districts of Pimlico and Victoria. The area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are the generally accepted ones of: Vauxhall Bridge Road to the north-east, the river Thames to the south, the Victoria railway line, Buckingham Palace Road/Buckingham Gate/Grosvenor Gardens to the west and Lower Grosvenor Place/Bressenden Place to the north. Victoria is a vaguely defined area, but is generally used to refer to streets immediately around the station of that name.

Alderney Street – this street was changed to ‘Alderley Street’ in 1879, in honour of the Stanley of Alderley family; however they were not pleased with this move and so the name was changed; prior to this it was Stanley Street, after George Stanley, local landowner[1][2]
Allington Street – after Allington, Lincolnshire[3]
Aylesford Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Balniel Gate
Balvaird Place
Beeston Place – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; the family owned land in Beeston, Cheshire[5]
Belgrave Road
Bessborough Gardens, Bessborough Place and Bessborough Street – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough[6][7]
Bressenden Place – this street was built in 1962, replacing a small line of shops called Bressenden Row; the origin of the name is unknown[8]
Bridge Place – after the Eccleston Bridge that stood here[9]
Buckingham Palace Road – by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham[10][11]
Bulleid Way
Buonaparte Mews
Cambridge Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Charlotte Place
Charlwood Place and Charlwood Street – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Charlwood, Surrey[12][13]
Chichester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Churchill Gardens Road – this post-war estate was named in honour of Prime Minister Winston Churchill[14][15]
Churton Place and Churton Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; they owned land in Churton, Cheshire[14][15]
Clarendon Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Claverton Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; they owned land in Claverton, Cheshire[14][4]
Colonnade Walk – presumably simply descriptive
Cumberland Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family state; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Dell’s Mews
Denbigh Place and Denbigh Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Dolphin Square – after the ‘dolphin’ formerly located here; it was a pump for drawing out river water[16]
Drummond Gate
Eaton Lane – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; the family owned land in Eaton, Cheshire[17][18]
Ebury Bridge – as this area was formerly part of the manor of Ebury, thought to have originated as a Latinisation of the Anglo-Saxon toponym ‘eyai’, which means ‘island’[19] in reference to a marsh that once dominated the area; the bridge here formerly stood over a small stream[20][18]
Eccleston Square and Eccleston Square Mews – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; they owned land in Eccleston, Cheshire[14][21]
Elizabeth Bridge – after Lady Elizabeth Leveson-Gower, wife of Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster[22]
Garden Terrace
Gillingham Mews, Gillingham Row and Gillingham Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Glasgow Terrac
Gloucester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Grosvenor Gardens, Grosvenor Gardens Mews, Grosvenor Road and Lower Grosvenor Place – as this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate[14][23]
Guildhouse Street – after the Guild House, which formerly stood near here on Eccleston Square from 1922-46[24][25]
Hudson’s Place – after the Hudson’s furniture depository formerly located here, founded by William Hudson[26]
Hugh Mews and Hugh Street – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land (though Hugh was a common name in the family and another individual may have been intended)[27][26]
Johnson’s Place – after John Johnson, Victorian-era local paviour/owner[28][29][30]
Lindsay Square
Longmoore Street – after the marshes formerly located here[31]
Lupus Street – after Hugh Grosvenor, 1st Duke of Westminster, whose family owned much of the surrounding land[32][33]
Moreton Place, Moreton Street and Moreton Terrace – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land near Moreton Morrell, Warwickshire[12][13]
Neathouse Place – after either an early settlement here of small cottages dubbed ‘neat houses’, or the Neate, a medieval manor located in Pimlico, stemming from a word meaning ‘islet'[34][35]
Paxton Terrace – thought to be after Joseph Paxton, Victoria-era gardener and designer of The Crystal Palace[36]
Peabody Avenue – after George Peabody, 19th century American philanthropist in London[37][38]
Rampayne Street – after Charles Rampanyne, who in 1705 left funds in his will for the children of the nearby Grey Coat Hospital[39][40]
Ranelagh Road – as it led to the former New Ranelagh Tea Gardens on the Thames, named in imitation of the popular Ranelagh Gardens in Chelsea, which were named for Richard Jones, 1st Earl of Ranelagh[39][41]
St George’s Drive, St George’s Square and St George’s Square Mews – after the manor of St George’s, Hanover Square which originally stretched to the Thames, and was named for George I[42][43]
Simon Milton Square – after Simon Milton, late 20th century/early 21st century Conservative politician
Sussex Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Sutherland Row and Sutherland Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate, several members of whom married into the Duke of Sutherland family[44]
Tachbrook Street and Upper Tachbrook Street – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land near Bishop’s Tachbrook, Warwickshire[12][13]
Telford Terrace – after the pioneering engineer Thomas Telford[45]
Terminus Place – descriptive, as it lies outside Victoria station terminus[46]
Thorndike Street
Turpentine Lane – as this lane was home to turpentine manufacturers in the 19th century[47]
Vauxhall Bridge Road – as it approaches Vauxhall Bridge, opened 1816[48][49]
Victoria Square and Victoria Street – after Queen Victoria, reigning monarch when the square was built in 1816 and the street in 1850-51[50][51]
Warwick Place North, Warwick Row, Warwick Square, Warwick Square Mews, Warwick Way, West Warwick Place – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire[52][13]
West Mews – a shortening of its pre-1936 name Warwick Place Mews West[53]
Westmoreland Place and Westmoreland Terrace – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one[4]
Wilton Road – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster married Eleanor Egerton, daughter of Thomas Egerton, 1st Earl of Wilton[54]
Winchester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London area of Regent’s Park (i.e. the park, its immediately surrounding terraces, and the estate to the east); the area has no formal boundaries, though it generally thought to be delimited by Prince Albert Road to the north, Park Village East and Hampstead Road/the Euston railway line/Eversholt Street to the east, Euston Road/Marylbone Road to the south and Park Road and Baker Street to the west,

Albany Street, Albany Terrace and Little Albany Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [1][2]
Allsop Place – as this area was formerly Allsop’s farm, after Thomas Allsop [3] [4]
Augustus Street – after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [5][6]
Avenue Road – simply a descriptive name [7][8]
Baker Street – after Edward Baker, friend and business partner of the Portman family [9] [10]
The Broad Walk – descriptive [11]
Brock Street –
Brunswick Place – after Caroline of Brunswick, wife of the Prince Regent (George IV) [12]
Cambridge Gate, Cambridge Gate Mews, Cambridge Terrace and Cambridge Terrace Mews – after Prince Adolphus, Duke of Cambridge, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [13][6]
Cardington Street – after the Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land at Cardington, Bedfordshire [14][15]
Charles Place –
Chester Close North, Chester Close South, Chester Court, Chester Gate, Chester Place, Chester Road and Chester Terrace – after the Prince Regent (George IV), also Earl of Chester [16][6]
Clarence Gardens, Clarence Gate and Clarence Terrace – after the future William IV, Duke of Clarence, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [17][6]
Cobourg Street – after Leopold I of Belgium off Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld, husband of Princess Charlotte of Wales, George IV’s daughter [18][19]
Compton Close –
Cornwall Terrace and Cornwall Terrace Mews –
Cumberland Market, Cumberland Place, Cumberland Terrace and Cumberland Terrace Mews – after Ernest Augustus, King of Hanover, Duke of Cumberland, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [20] [6]
Drummond Street – after Lady Caroline Drummond, a member of the Duke of Grafton’s family [21]
Edward Mews and Little Edward Street – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [6]
Euston Grove, Euston Road, Euston Square, Euston Station Colonnade, Euston Street and Euston Underpass – after the earl of Euston, son of the duke of Grafton, local landowners when the road was built in the 1760s [22] [23]
Eversholt Street –after the Dukes of Bedford, whose seat was at Woburn Abbey near Eversholt, Bedfordshire [22]
Everton Buildings –
Exmouth Mews – presumably by relation to Exmouth Street, now Starcross Street
Foundry Mews –
George Mews – presumably for the Prince Regent (George IV)
Gloucester Gate, Gloucester Gate Bridge and Gloucester Gate Mews – after Princess Mary, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh, sister of the Prince Regent (George IV) [24][6]
Granby Terrace – after John Manners, Marquess of Granby, noted Georgian-era military commander [25][26]
Hampstead Road – as it leads to the north London district of this name [27] [28]
Hanover Gate, and Hanover Terrace and Hanover Terrace Mews – after the House of Hanover, reigning dynasty when the square and street were built in 1713 [29][6]
Harrington Street – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford; Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford was married to Anna Russell, Duchess of Bedford, daughter of Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington[30][31]
Inner Circle and Outer Circle – simply descriptive names [32]
Kent Passage and Kent Terrace – after Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [33][6]
Laxton Place – after its 1806 developer, the baker George Laxton [34]
Longford Street –
Macclesfield Bridge – after George Parker, 4th Earl of Macclesfield, chairman of the Regent’s Canal Company in the 17th century [35]
MacFarren Place – after George Alexander Macfarren, composer and principal at the nearby Royal Academy of Music [36][37]
Mackworth Street – after Thomas Mackworth, local landowner who is buried nearby; it was formerly Rutland Street, after John Manners, Marquess of Granby (also Duke of Rutland), but was changed in 1938 to avoid confusion with several other similarly named streets [37]
Marylebone Road – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church (1817); the original church was built on the bank of a small stream or “bourne”, called the Tybourne or Tyburn.[38] This stream rose further north in what is now Swiss Cottage, eventually running along what is now Marylebone Lane, which preserves its curve within the grid pattern. The church and the surrounding area later became known as St Mary at the Bourne which, over time, became shortened to its present form, Marylebone[39]
Melton Street – unknown [40]
Mornington Street – after Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, Earl of Mornington, noted 18th – 19th century statesman [41][42]
Munster Square – after the future William IV, Earl of Munster, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [43][6]
Nash Street – after John Nash, architect of the terraces around Regent’s Park [44] [45]
Netley Street – possibly after Netley in Hampshire [46]
North Gower Street – after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford; it is the northern extension of Gower Street [47]
Nottingham Terrace – after Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [48]
Osnaburgh Street and Osnaburgh Terrace – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, Prince-Bishopric of Osnabrück (Osnaburgh in English), brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [49] [6]
Park Road – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [50]
Park Square, Park Square East, Park Square Mews and Park Square West – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [51][50]
Park Village East and Park Village West – after the adjacent Regent’s Park [50]
Peto Place – after Samuel Morton Peto, MP, entrepreneur, civil engineer and railway developer, who paid for a Batist chapel to be built here in 1855 (since closed) [52]
Prince Albert Road – after Albert, Prince Consort; formerly Primrose Hill Road [53] [54]
Prince of Wales Passage – after the Royal family
Prince Regent Mews – after the Prince Regent, later George IV, by association with Regent’s Park [6]
Redhill Street –
Regnart Buildings –
Robert Street –
St Andrew’s Place – after the later William IV, Duke of St Andrews, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [6]
St Katherine’s Precinct – after the former Anglican chapel of St Katharine’s Hospital, which retains its original dedication to Saint Katharine, and was built in 1826-8 (now the Danish Church)
Stanhope Street – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford; Francis Russell, 7th Duke of Bedford was married to Anna Russell, Duchess of Bedford, daughter of Charles Stanhope, 3rd Earl of Harrington[30][31]
Starcross Street – formerly Exmouth Street, it was renamed after the town of this name in Devon to avoid confusion with similarly named streets [55][56]
Station Approach – descriptive, next to Euston station
Stephenson Way – after Robert Stephenson, Victoria-era builder of the adjacent Euston station [57]
Sussex Place – after Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [58][6]
Tolmers Square – after the village of this name in Hertfordshire; the New River flowed from the county and this land was formerly a reservoir owned by the New River Company [59][60]
Triton Square and Triton Street – after the Greek god of this name [61] [62]
Ulster Place and Ulster Terrace – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, Earl of Ulster, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [63][6]
Varndell Street – after the architect CE Varndell, who took over as surveyor the Regent’s Park development from John Nash [64][45]
William Road – after the later William IV, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [65][6]
Wybert Street –
York Bridge, York Gate, York Terrace East and York Terrace West – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV)

St Giles has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here form a rough triangle: New Oxford Street to the north, Shaftesbury Avenue to the south-east and Charing Cross Road to the west.

Brook Mews –
Bucknall Street – after either Arabella Bucknall (or Bucknell), mother of John Hanmer, 1st Baron Hanmer who owned this land in the 19th century[15], or Ralph Bucknall, local 17th – 18th century vestryman[16]
Cambridge Circus – after Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, who formally opened the new development of Charing Cross Road in 1887[17][18]
Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[19][20][21]
Denmark Place and Denmark Street – after Prince George of Denmark, husband of Queen Anne[22] [23]
Dyott Street – after either Simon Dyott, local resident in the 17th century[24], or Jane Dyott, daughter of local landowner Henry Bainbridge[25]
Earnshaw Street – after Thomas Earnshaw, noted watchmaker of the 18th-19th century, who worked near here[26][27]
Flitcroft Street – after Henry Flitcroft, architect of St Giles in the Fields church[28][29]
New Compton Street – as with Old Compton Street which extends to the west, it is believed to be named after Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s[30][31]
New Oxford Street – built as an extension of Oxford Street in 1845-47[32][33]
Phoenix Street – named after an inn that formerly stood near here[34][35]
Princes Circus –
St Giles Circus, St Giles High Street and St Giles Passage – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction[36][37]
Shaftesbury Avenue – after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist[38][39]
Stacey Street – after John Stacey, local landowner in the 16th century

Street name etymologies
The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of St James’s viz. Piccadilly to the north, Haymarket and Cockspur Street to the east, The Mall to the south and Queen’s Walk to the west.

Angel Court – thought to be after a former inn of this name[9]
Apple Tree Yard – thought to be after the apple trees formerly to be found here; formerly Angier Street [10][11]
Arlington Street – after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner[12][13]
Babmaes Street – named after Baptist May (or Mays), trustee to local landowner Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans; it was formerly known as Babmay’s Mews[14][15]
Bennet Street – after Henry Bennet, 1st Earl of Arlington, 17th century statesman and local landowner[16][17]
Blue Ball Yard – after the former 18th century Blew Ball tavern here [18]
Bury Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans and Baron Jermyn of St Edmunsbury (Bury St Edmunds), 17th century politician and local landowner[19][20]
Carlton Gardens, Carlton Street and Carlton House Terrace – after the former Carlton House, built here in 1709 for Henry Boyle, 1st Baron Carleton[21][22]
Catherine Wheel Yard – from the name of an inn that stood on this site until it burnt down in 1895[23][24]
Charing Cross – after the Eleanor cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[25][26]
Charles II Street – named after Charles II, king when this street was built[25][27]
Church Place – after the adjacent St James’s Church, Piccadilly; formerly Church Passage [28][29]
Cleveland Place and Cleveland Row – after Cleveland House (now Bridgwater House), named for Barbara Palmer, 1st Duchess of Cleveland who lived there in the late 17th century[30][31]
Cockspur Court and Cockspur Street – unknown, though possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights[32]
Crown Passage – thought to be after a former tavern of this name[33]
Duke Street, St James’s and Duke of York Street – named after James II, Duke of York when the street was built and brother to Charles II, king at the time[34][27]
Eagle Place –
Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s[35][36]
Jermyn Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner[37][20]
King Street – named after Charles I, king when this street was built in the 1600s[38][27]
The Mall – built as a course for playing the game pall mall, fashionable in the 17th century[39][40]
Marlborough Road – after the adjacent Marlborough House, built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough in 1711[41]
Mason’s Yard – after the local 18th century victualler Henry Mason; it was formerly known as West Stable Yard[42][43]
Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century[44][45]
Ormond Yard – after James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who owned a house next to this yard in the 17th century[46][47]
Pall Mall and Pall Mall Place – laid out as a grounds for playing pall mall in the 17th century[48][40]
Park Place – after the nearby Green Park[49]
Piccadilly, Piccadilly Arcade and Piccadilly Circus – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was laid out by John Nash in 1819[50][51]
Pickering Place – after William Pickering, local painter stainer and grocer, who leased property here in the 1730s [52][53]
Princes Arcade – built 1929-33, named after the former Prince’s Hotel, which stood here [28]
Princes Place –
Queen’s Walk – after Caroline of Ansbach, wife of George II, who took a strong interest in the Royal Parks[54]
Regent Street – made in the 1810s by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent, later George IV[55][56]
Rose and Crown Yard – unknown, probably after a former inn of this name[57]
Royal Opera Arcade – originally part of an opera house theatre, built by John Nash[58][59]
Russell Court – after the Russell family, who lived here in the 1600s [60][61]
Ryder Court, Ryder Street and Ryder Yard – after Richard Rider, Master Carpenter to Charles II[62]
St Alban’s Street – after Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of Saint Albans, 17th century politician and local landowner[37][20]
St James’s Market, St James’s Place, St James’s Square, St James’s Street and Little St James’s Street – the site of St James’s Palace was originally the site of St James’s leper hospital in the Middle Ages, named after James, son of Zebedee[63][64]
Spring Gardens – after the 17th century pleasure grounds of this name which formerly lay on this site; they were closed in 1660[65][66]
Stable Yard and Stable Yard Road – as they leads to the stables of St James’s Palace[67]
Warwick House Street – formerly approached Warwick House, built in the 17th century for Sir Philip Warwick[68][69]
Waterloo Place – after the Battle of Waterloo which ended the Napoleonic Wars

St Luke’s has no formal boundaries – those utilised here are form a rough triangle: City Road and Finsbury Pavement/Finsbury Square to the east, the boundary with the City of London to the south and Goswell Road to the west.

Anchor Yard – after a former inn here of this name[6]
Angel Gate
Baldwin Street – after Richard Baldwin, Treasurer at St Bartholomew’s Hospital when the street was built in 1811[7]
Baltic Street East and Baltic Street West – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Baltic refers to the Baltic softwood trade[8][9]
Banner Street – after the Banner family, late 18th century landowners in the area[10][11]
Bartholomew Square – as it was built in 1811 on land owned by St Bartholomew’s Hospital[12][13]
Bastwick Street – unknown; possibly after Bastwick in Norfolk[14]
Bath Street – after the former Peerless Pool here, later turned into a bath; it was formerly Pest House Row, after a plague hospital built here in the Tudor era (demolished 1736)[15][16]
Beard Street
Bunhill Row – from the adjacent Bunhill Fields cemetery, from ‘bone hill’[17][18]
Cahill Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s[19]
Cayton Place and Cayton Street – renamed, after the village in Yorkshire, from New Street in 1805, to avoid confusion with other streets of this name[20]
Central Street – named thus in 1861, as it lay in the centre of St Luke’s Parish[21][20]
Chequer Street – after the former Chequers tavern here[22][23]
Cherry Tree Walk
Chiswell Street – old term meaning stony/gravelly earth[24]or a corruption of ‘Choice Well’, denoting a source of clean water[25]
City Road – as it connects Islington to the City of London[26][27]
Crescent Row – descriptive, after its shape[28]
Dingley Place and Dingley Road – after Charles Dingley, who instigated the construction of City Road in 1756[29][27]
Domingo Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Domingo is an alternative name for Hispaniola, a source of mahogany[30][9]
Dufferin Avenue and Dufferin Court – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s[19]
Errol Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s[19]
Europa Place – unknown[31]
Exchange Street – after the former Clerkenwell Telephone Exchange[31]
Featherstone Street – after the Featherstone family, local landowners after Matthew Featherstone bought land here in 1732[32][33]
Finsbury Pavement, Finsbury Square and Finsbury Street – after a Saxon burgh (settlement) owned by someone called Finn[34][35]
Fortune Street – after the Fortune Playhouse, which formerly stood here on the junction with Golden Lane; it was closed in 1648[36][37]
Fredericks’s Row
Galway Street – after Henri de Massue, Earl of Galway, first governor of the French Hospital that was formerly here[38][39]
Gard Street – after a member of the nearby Orphan Working School[40]
Garrett Street – after a person of this name who was a member of the local parish vestry Works Committee[41][42]
Gee Street – after its 1784 builder, Osgood Gee[41][43]
George Gillett Court – for George Gillett, local politician in the early 20th century
Golden Lane – ormerly Goldynglane, thought to be after a local property owner of the name Golding/Golda[44][45]
Goswell Road – there is dispute over the origins of the name, with some sources claiming the road was named after a nearby garden called ‘Goswelle’ or ‘Goderell’ which belonged to Robert de Ufford, 1st Earl of Suffolk,[46] whilst others state it derives from “God’s Well”, and the traditional pagan practice of well-worship,[47] or a former ‘Gode Well’ located here[48]
Hall Street – after James and Joseph Hall who built the street in 1822[49][50]
Helmet Row – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land; their arms incorporates a helmet motif[51][52]
Honduras Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Honduras was a source of mahogany[30][9]
Hull Street – after its 18th century builder, William Hulls[53][54]
Ironmonger Passage and Ironmonger Row – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land[55][52]
King Square – built 1820, and named for George IV[56][57]
Lamb’s Buildings and Lamb’s Passage – after its early 19th century owner William (or Thomas) Lamb; it was formerly known as Great Swordbearers Alley[58][59]
Lever Street – unknown[60]
Lizard Street – after the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers, who owned this land; their arms incorporates a salamander motif[61][52]
Ludlow Street – unknown[62]
Macclesfield Road – after George Parker, 4th Earl of Macclesfield, chairman of the canal company in the 17th century[63][64]
Mallow Street – after the former mallow field located here[65][66]
Martha’s Buildings
Masons Place and Masons Yard
Memel Court and Memel Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Memel was a timber exporting port in Germany (now Klaipeda in Lithuania)[30][9]
Mitchell Street – after John Mitchell, who bequeathed this land to the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers in 1527[67][52]
Moor Lane – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here[68][69][70]
Mora Street – after the prebend of Moor/Mora, belonging to St Paul’s Cathedral, named for the local moors[71][72]
Moreland Street – after the Moreland family, prominent locally in the 19th century[71][72]
Mount Mills – after a former mount here supporting a windmill, later a chapel, and then in the Civil War a raised battery; it was levelled in 1750[73][74]
Nag’s Head Court – after a former inn of this name[75]
Nelson Passage – after Admiral Horatio Nelson[75][76]
New Charles Street – as this formerly led to a Charles Street, named for Charles II[77]
Norman Street – after bricklayer William Norman, who leased land here in the 1750s[78][52]
Old Street – after its age, thought to have ultimately Roman origins[79][80]
Paton Street – unknown[81]
Pear Tree Street – after the pear trees formerly grown here[82][83]
Peerless Street – site of the Peerless Pool, a bath used in the 18th century, thought to be a corruption of ‘perilous’[84][85]
Pickard Street – after a clergyman of this name who founded the Orphan Working School here in 1754[86][87]
President Street –
Radnor Street – after the Earls of Radnor, who governed the French Hospital that was formerly here[38][39]
Red Cow Lane –
Ropemaker Street – descriptive, after the rope making trade formerly located here[88][89]
Roscoe Street – thought to be named after a trustee of the Peabody Donation Fund, who redeveloped this former slum area in the 1880s[19]
St Agnes Well – after an ancient well thought to have been located about 200 metres to the east, at the junction of Old Street and Great Eastern Street. Remnants of the well can be found within Old Street station.[90]
St Luke’s Close – after the adjacent St Luke Old Street church[91]
Seward Street – after Edward Seward, who owned a dyeworks here in the 18th century[92][93]
Sidney Grove
Sundial Court
Sutton’s Way
Sycamore Street – by association with the nearby Timber Street[94], or possibly after an inn of this name[95]
Timber Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities[8][9]
Wakley Street – after 19th century surgeon and social reformer Thomas Wakley[96][97]
Warwick Yard – unknown[98]
Whitecross Street – after a white cross which stood near here in the 1200s[99][100]
Withers Place – after William Withers, 18th century property owner[101][102]
Youngs Buildings – after Francis Young, local 18th century property owner

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Soho, in the City of Westminster. The following utilises the generally accepted boundaries of Soho viz. Oxford Street to the north, Charing Cross Road to the east, Shaftesbury Avenue to the south and Regent Street to the west.

Air Street – believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century[1][2]
Archer Street – formerly Arch Street, presumed to be after a former archway on this site[3][4]
Argyll Street and Little Argyll Street – after John Campbell, 2nd Duke of Argyll, owner of the land in the 18th century[5][6]
Bateman’s Buildings and Bateman Street – after Sir James Bateman, who owned a house on this site in the 18th century[7][8]
Beak Street – after Thomas Beak, or Beake, who owned this land in the late 17th century; the section between Upper James Street and Lexington Street was originally called Silver Street until 1883[9][10]
Berwick Street – after James FitzJames, 1st Duke of Berwick, son of James II, as the local landowner James Pollett was a Roman Catholic[11]
Blore Court – unknown; possibly after 19th century architect Edward Blore, who built the nearby St Luke’s House (demolished 1936, now Kemp House)[12]
Bourchier Street – after Rev. Basil Bourchier, rector of St Anne’s Church, Soho in the early 1930s; prior to renaming in 1937 it was Little Dean Street, and further back it has been known as Milk Alley and Hedge Lane[13][14]
Brewer Street – after the breweries that existed here in the 17th century; the eastern-most section was formerly known as Little Pulteney Street until 1937[15][16]
Bridle Lane – thought to be after Abraham Bridle, a carpenter who leased land here in the last 17th century[17][18]
Broadwick Street – originally Broad Street, it was renamed in 1936 to avoid confusion with other Broad Streets; the eastern-most section between Berwick Street and Wardour Street was formerly called Edward Street, after Edward Wardour[19][20]
Cambridge Circus – after Prince George, 2nd Duke of Cambridge, who formally opened the new development of Charing Cross Road in 1887[21][22]
Carlisle Street – after Carlisle House on Soho Square, owned by the earls of Carlisle[23][24]
Carnaby Street – after Karnaby House, owned by 17th century property developer Richard Tyler; the meaning of the ‘Karnaby’ is unknown[25][26]
Chapone Place – after famed Georgian essayist Hester Chapone, who lived nearby on Dean Street; formerly Dean’s Yard[27][28]
Charing Cross Road – built 1887, and named as it led to the cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[29][30][31]
D’Arblay Street – after the author Frances Burney, Madame D’Arblay, who lived on Poland Street as a girl[32][33]
Dean Street – unknown; possibly by connection with Old Compton Street, named for Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s, who was also Dean of the Chapel Royal[34]
Denman Street – after Thomas Denman, 1st Baron Denman, 19th century attorney general, who was born here; it was formerly known Queen Street, in honour of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II[35][36]
Diadem Court – unknown, though possibly from a former inn; formerly Crown Court[37][38]
Duck Lane –
Dufour’s Place – from the early 18th century street builder Paul Dufour[39][40]
Falconberg Mews – after Falconberg House (demolished 1924) the former home of Thomas Belasyse, 1st Viscount Fauconberg in the 17th century[41][42]
Fareham Street – built in the early 18th century as Titchfield Street, after the Duke of Portland, Marquis of Titchfield (in Hampshire); the street was renamed in 1950 after the neighbouring town of Fareham[41]
Flaxman Court – after the John Flaxman, 18th – 19th century sculptor who lived on Wardour Street[43][44]
Foubert’s Place – after Major Henry Foubert, who established a military riding school nearby in the 18th century[45][46]
Frith Street – after Robert Frith, late 17th century property develop in the area[47][48]
Ganton Street – unknown, though possibly after Ganton, North Yorkshire; prior to 1886 this was three separate streets – Cross Street, Cross Court and South Row [49][50]
Glasshouse Street – after a former glass factory on this site[51][52][53]
Golden Square – believed to be a corruption of ‘gelding’, after Gelding’s Close, a field in the site prior to the square’s creation in 1670[54][55]
Goslett Yard – named after A Goslett & Co, builders’ merchants, who occupied a building nearby on Charing Cross Road; formerly George Yard[56][57]
Great Chapel Street – this formerly approached a Huguenot chapel on the corner with Sheraton Street (then called Little Chapel Street)[58][59]
Great Marlborough Street, Little Marlborough Street and Marlborough Court – after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general[58][60]
Great Pulteney Street – after Sir William Pulteney, who built the street in 1719-20; the ‘great’ prefix was to distinguish it from Little Pulteney Street, now the eastern end of Brewer Street[61][62]
Great Windmill Street – after a windmill that formerly stood near here in Ham Yard n the 17th century; the ‘great’ prefix was to distinguish it from Little Windmill Street, now Lexington Street[63][64]
Greek Court and Greek Street – after the Greek refugees, and the church they built nearby, who came here fleeing Ottoman rule in the 17th century[63][65]
Green’s Court – after the paviour Thomas Green, who leased land here from Edward Wardour in 1685 [66][67]
Ham Yard – after the Ham tavern, now the Lyric, on the corner with Great Windmill Street[68][69]
Hills Place – thought to be after local resident in the 1860s TH Hills; formerly Queen Street[70]
Hollen Street – after its builder Allen Hollen, in the 18th century[71][72]
Hopkins Street – after Richard Hopkins, who owned a lease here in the early 18th century[73][74]
Ingestre Place – after Lord Ingestre, who financed the building of an artisans’ block here in 1852; before this it was two streets – New Street and Husband Street, after Thomas Husbands, 18th century local building owner[75][76]
Kemp’s Court –
Kingly Court and Kingly Street – originally ‘King Street’, in honour eithee of the original owner of this land of Henry III, or James II, reigning monarch when built; it was renamed in 1906 so as to avoid confusion with other King Streets[77][78]
Lexington Street – named in 1885 after the Baron Lexington, whose family – the Suttons – purchased this land in 1645; it was formerly known as Little Windmill Street[79][80]
Livonia Street – thought to be after Livonia (roughly modern Latvia), in allusion to the nearby Poland Street. Prior to 1894 it was called Bentinck Street, from the family name of the Duke of Portland, local landowners [81][82]
Lower James Street and Upper James Street – after James Axtell, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s[83]
Lower John Street and Upper John Street – after John Emlyn, co-owner of the land when Golden Square was developed in the 1670s[83][84]
Lowndes Court – after William Lowndes, 16th-17th century financier and politician, who owned land here [85][86]
Manette Street – after the Manette family in Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, part of which is set on this street[87][88]
Marshall Street – built in the 1730s by the Earl of Craven, whose seat was at Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire[89][90]
Meard Street – after John Meard, local carpenter in the 18th century[91][92]
Moor Street – unknown[93]
Newburgh Street –
Noel Street – after Lady Elizabeth Noel, who developed the estate on behalf of her son William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland[94][95]
Old Compton Street – as with New Compton Street which extends to the east, it is believed to be named after Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s[96][97]
Orange Yard –
Oxford Circus, Oxford Circus Avenue and Oxford Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer who owned much of the local estate; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was formerly Regent Circus, after Regent Street[98][99]
Peter Street – thought to be from a nearby saltpetre factory that stood here in the 17th century[100][101]
Piccadilly Circus – after Piccadilly Hall, home of local tailor Robert Baker in the 17th century, believed to be named after the pickadils (collars/hem trimmings) which made his fortune. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was laid out by John Nash in 1819[102][103]
Poland Street – from The King of Poland, former pub on this street named in honour of the Polish victory at the Battle of Vienna[104][105]
Portland Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, built in the 1730s[106][107]
Quadrant Arcade – simply descriptive
Ramillies Place and Ramillies Street – after the British victory at the Battle of Ramillies in Ramillies, Belgium[108][109]
Regent Place and Regent Street – made in the 1810s by John Nash and named after the Prince Regent, later George IV[110][111]
Richmond Buildings and Richmond Mews – after Thomas Richmond, local carpenter in the 18th century[112][113]
Romilly Street – after 17th – 19th century legal reforming Samuel Romilly, who was born nearby[114][115]
Royalty Mews – after the former New Royalty Theatre on this site, demolished in the 1950s[116]
Rupert Street – after Prince Rupert of the Rhine, noted 17th century general and son of Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of King James I[117][118]
St Anne’s Court – after the surrounding parish of St Anne’s and the church, named after Saint Anne[119][120]
St Giles Circus, St Giles High Street and St Giles Passage – after St Giles Hospital, a leper hospital founded by Matilda of Scotland, wife of Henry I in 1117. St Giles was an 8th century hermit in Provence who was crippled in a hunting accident and later became patron saint of cripples and lepers. Circus is a British term for a road junction[121][122]
Shaftesbury Avenue – after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist[123][124]
Sheraton Street – after Thomas Sheraton, noted furniture maker of the 18th century, who lived nearby[125][126]
Sherwood Street – corruption of ‘Sherard’; Francis Sherard was a local developer in the late 17th century[127][128]
Silver Place – unknown, possibly by association with the nearby Golden Square[9][129]
Smith’s Court –
Soho Square and Soho Street – Soho was in times past open hunting ground, and it thought to have gained its name from the hunting cry of ‘soho!’; the square was formerly King Square, thought to be in honour of Charles II[130][131]
Sutton Row – Thomas Belasyse, 1st Viscount Fauconberg owned a house here in the 17th century – his country house was Sutton House in Chiswick[132][133]
Tenison Court – after the Tension Chapel, now St Thomas, on Kingly Street; it was named after Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury in the early 18th century[134][135]
Tisbury Court –
Tyler’s Court – after Richard Tyler, late-17th century local bricklayer[136][137]
Walker’s Court –
Wardour Mews and Wardour Street – named after local 17th century landowners the Wardour family, and formerly called Colman Hedge Lane after a nearby field; the section south of Brewer Street was formerly Prince Street prior to 1878, in parallel with Rupert Street[138][139]
Warwick Street – unknown; formerly Dog Lane, later Marrowbone/Marylebone Street[140][141]
Wedgewood Mews – after Josiah Wedgewood, Georgian-era manufacturer of high-quality pottery and a campaigner for social reform, who owned a pottery near here [142]
Wilder Walk –
Winnett Street – named after local business owner William Winnett in 1935; prior to this it was Upper Rupert Street

This is a list of the etymology of Somers Town streets.

Aldenham Road – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, who gave part of the land for the endowment of Aldenham School, Hertfordshire [36] [37]
Bridgeway Street – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage; formerly Bridgewater Street[38][39]
Charrington Street – as this land was formerly owned by the Worshipful Company of Brewers, and named for the Charrington Brewery [40][41]
Chenies Place – after local landowners the dukes of Bedford, also titled Barons Russell, of Chenies [42]
Churchway – as this formed part of old pathway to St Pancras Old Church [43]
Clarendon Grove – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage [39]
Cranleigh Street – by connection with the Barons Ossulton peerage; formerly Johnson Street[44] [39]
Crowndale Road – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land in Crowndale, Devon [45][46]
Doric Way – after the Euston Doric Arch, demolished in 1961[47]
Drummond Crescent – part of the Duke of Grafton’s FitzRoy Estate, named after Lady Caroline Drummond, great grand-daughter of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Grafton[48][49]
Euston Road – developed in 1756 by the 2nd Duke of Grafton on land belonging to the FitzRoy Estate, named after Euston Hall, the Graftons’ family home[48][50][51]
Eversholt Street – after the Dukes of Bedford, whose seat was at Woburn Abbey near Eversholt, Bedfordshire [50]
Goldington Crescent and Goldington Street – formerly part of the Duke of Bedford’s Figs Mead Estate (later Bedford New Town), who also owned land in Goldington, Bedfordshire[52][45][53]
Grafton Place – originally part of the Duke of Grafton’s FitzRoy Estate[54][55]
Hampstead Road – as it leads to the north London district of this name [56][57]
Medburn Street – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, who gave part of his land at Medburn Farm, Hertfordshire for the endowment of Aldenham School [58][59]
Midland Road – after the adjacent railway line, built by the Midland Railway Company; part was formerly Skinner Street, on the Skinners’ Company’s Estate[60][61]
Oakley Square – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land in Oakley, Bedfordshire [62][63]
Ossulton Street – named in 1807 in memory of the Saxon-era hundred of Ossulton, thought to be named after a stone boundary marker at Tyburn (now Marble Arch) erected by one Oswulf/Oswald [64][65]
Pancras Road – after the adjacent St Pancras Old Church, named for the Roman-era Christian matyr Pancras of Rome [66][67]
Phoenix Road – thought to be after a former tavern of this name; formerly Phoenix Street[68][69]
Platt Street – after Richard Platt, 16th century brewer, who donated this land to the Worshipful Company of Brewers, who built this street in 1848-53 [70][71]
Polygon Road – after the Polygon, a 17th century housing development here instigated by Jacob Leroux and Job Hoare [72][73][74]
Purchese Street – after Frederick Purchese, local resident, vestryman, county council member and Mayor of St Pancras[75][76]
Werrington Street – after Werrington, Cornwall, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford held land [77]; formerly Clarendon Street

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Southwark (also called Borough). The area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are: the river Thames to the north, Tower Bridge Road to the east, Bricklayer’s Arms/New Kent Road/Elephant and Castle to the south, and London Road/St George’s Circus/Blackfriars Road to the west.

Abbey Street – after Bermondsey Abbey, formerly located here[1]
Alderney Mews
Alice Street
America Street
Angel Place – formerly Angel Alley, both after a former inn here of this name[2]
Arch Street
Archie Street
Avon Place
Avonmouth Street – unknown; formerly Devonshire Street[3][4]
Ayres Street – after Alice Ayres, local resident who died whilst saving the lives of three children in a house fire in 1885[5]
Baden Place
Bank End and Bankside – both after former earthen banks built to protect against the Thames[6][7]
Barnham Street
Bartholomew Street – after a former hospital located near here run by St Bartholomew’s Hospital[8]
Bath Terrace
Battle Bridge Lane – after medieval landowners the abbots of Battle[9][10]
Bear Gardens and Bear Lane – both after the sport of bear baiting formerly practised here[11][12]
Becket Street – after Thomas Becket, murdered Archbishop of Canterbury, by association with the pilgrims who went this way to Canterbury[13][14]
Bedale Street – after Bedale, Yorkshire; it was formerly York Street after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany but was changed in 1891 to avoid confusion with similarly named streets; further back still it was Foul Lane, a descriptive epithet[15]
Bedford Row
Bell Yard Mews
Belvedere Buildings and Belvedere Place
Bermondsey Square and Bermondsey Street – understood to mean ‘Beornmund’s island’; but, while “Beornmund” represents an Old English personal name, identifying an individual once associated with the place, the element “-ey” represents Old English “eg”, for “island”, “piece of firm land in a fen”, or simply a “place by a stream or river”. Thus Bermondsey need not have been an island as such in the Anglo-Saxon period, and is as likely to have been a higher, drier spot in an otherwise marshy area.[16][17][18]
Bickels Yard
Bittern Street
Blackfriars Road – named after Blackfriars Bridge in 1769/70; it was formerly Great Surrey Street, reflecting the traditional county it is in[19][20]
Black Horse Court – after a former inn here of this name[19]
Black Swan Yard – after a former inn here of this name[19]
Blue Lion Place
Borough High Street, Borough Road and Borough Square – after the ancient Borough of Southwark[21][22]
Bowling Green Place – after an 18th-century bowling green located here[23]
Boyfield Street – after Josiah Boyfield, local landowner and clothmaker[23]
Braidwood Street – after 19th century fireman James Braidwood[24][25]
Brew Wharf Yard
Bricklayer’s Arms – after a former coaching inn here of this name
Bridge Yard – presumably with reference to the nearby London Bridge
Brinton Walk
Brockham Street – unknown; formerly Church Street[26]
Brunswick Court
Burbage Close – after Richard Burbage, noted Shakespearian actor[27]
Burge Street
Burrell Street
Bursar Street – after William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester in the 15th century; he left an endowment of local property to the College[28]
Caleb Street
Calvert’s Buildings – after Felix Calvert, 18th century brewer here[29]
Canvey Street – after Canvey Island in Essex; it was formerly Essex Street[30]
Cardinal Bourne Street – after Francis Bourne, Bishop of Southwark in the late 19th century[31]
Cardinal Cap Alley – after a former inn or brothel here, called either the Cardinal’s Cap or Hat[31][32]
Carmarthen Place
Castle Yard – after a former inn here of this name[33]
Cathedral Street – after the adjacent Southwark Cathedral[33][34]
Chaloner Court
Chancel Street
Chapel Court
Chettle Close
City Walk
Clennam Street
Clink Street – after The Clink prison formerly located here[35][36]
Cluny Place – after Bermondsey Abbey, initially established as a Cluniac order[37]
Coach House Mews
Cole Street
Collinson Street and Collinson Walk – after the Collinson family, noted for their active interest in local and church affairs in the 19th century[38]
Collinwood Street
Copperfield Street – after the novel David Copperfield by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[39]
Cottons Lane
Counter Street – corruption of compter (small prison), as the borough’s compter formerly stood here[40]
County Street
Crosby Court and Crosby Row
Crucifix Lane – after the former Cross of Bermondsey located here; it was destroyed in 1559[41][42]
Davidge Street
Decima Street
Deverell Street
Dickens Square – after Charles Dickens, who spent part of his childhood here[43]
Disney Place and Disney Street
Dolben Street – after John Dolben, 17th century archbishop; it was formerly George Street[44]
Dorrit Street and Little Dorrit Court – after the novel Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[45]
Doyce Street
Druid Street – possibly after a former inn here with ‘Druid’ in its name[46]
Duchess Walk
Duke Street Hill – named for Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, 19th century military figure[47][48]
Dunsterville Way
Elephant and Castle – derived from a coaching inn of this name[49][50]
Elim Street
Emerson Street – after Thomas Emerson, 15th century local benefactor[51][52]
English Grounds – thought to be after the English workers here during the railway boom, who were kept separate from the Irish ones nearby at Irish Grounds[53]
Ewer Lane
Fair Street – after the former Horselydown Fair held here[54]
Falmouth Road
Farnham Place
Fenning Street
Flatriron Square and Flatiron Yard
Gaitskell Way
Gambia Street – unknown; formerly William Street[55]
Gatehouse Square
Gaunt Street
George Inn Yard – after the adjacent George Inn[56][57]
Gibbon’s Rents
Glasshill Street – after the former glassworks located here; formerly just Hill Street[58]
Globe Street – after the former inn here of this name, possibly named for the Globe Theatre[59]
Great Dover Street – as this formed part of the traditional London to Dover road[60]
Great Guildford Street – after Suffolk House, owned by Lady Jane Guildford in the early Tudor period; possibly also in allusion to Guildford, county town of Surrey[60][61]
Great Maze Pond – after the Medieval Maze Manor here, named for a prominent maze in its grounds[60][62]
Great Suffolk Street – after Suffolk House, home to Charles Brandon, 1st Duke of Suffolk in the Tudor period[63][61]
Great Yard
Green Dragon Court – after a Tudor-era inn here of this name[64]
Green Walk
Grotto Court – after Thomas Finch’s Grotto Grounds, 18th century pleasure grounds located near here[65]
Guildable Bridge Street – the term ‘Guildable’ is first recorded in 1377, refers to the collection of taxes there and was adopted to distinguish this from the other manors of the Southwark area[66]
Guinness Court
Guy Street – after Thomas Guy, founder of Guy’s Hospital[67]
Haddon Hall Street – after Haddon Hall, local religious mission named for Charles Haddon Spurgeon, noted Victorian-era preacher[68]
Hamlet Way
Hankey Place – after Donald Hankey, prominent member of the local Edwardian-era charitable organisation the Oxford and Bermondsey Club[69]
Hardwidge Street – after James Hardwidge, local 18th century needlemaker and church benefactor[70]
Harper Road – unknown; it was changed from Union Road to avoid confusion with similarly named streets, and before that it was Horsemonger Lane, after the local horse dealers[71]
Hatchers Mews
Hay’s Lane – after the Hays family, who owned nearby Hay’s Wharf[72][73]
Holland Street – after a former manor house here called Holland’s Leaguer, possibly named from its owner’s family name[74]
Holyrood Street – after the former Rood (cross) of Bermondsey located here; it was destroyed in 1559[41][75]
Hopton Street and Hopton’s Gardens – after Charles Hopton, who funded the local almshouses here in the 18th century[74][75]
Horsemongers Mews – probably by association with the nearby Horsemongers Lane (now Harper Road)[71]
Hulme Place
Hunter Close
Invicta Plaza
Issac Way
Joiner Street
Jubilee Walkway – named in 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II
Kell Stree
Kentish Buildings – after 17th century property owner Thomas Kentish; formerly it was Christopher Alley, after an inn of this name named in 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II[76]
Keppel Row – after Augustus Keppel, 1st Viscount Keppel, 18th century naval figure[77]
Keyworth Place and Keyworth Street – after Leonard James Keyworth, recipient of a Victoria Cross in the First World War[77]
King James Court and King James Street
King’s Bench Street – after the King’s Bench Prison formerly located here[78]
King’s Court
King’s Head Yard – after a former inn here of this name[79][80]
King’s Place
Kipling Street
Kirby Grove
Lamb Walk – after a 17th-century inn here of this nam[81]
Lancaster Street – unknown; formerly Union Street[82]
Lansdowne Place
Lant Street – named after Thomas Lane, local 17th century landowner[83]
Lavington Street – after Thomas Lant, local 18th century developer[84]
Law Street
Leathermarket Court and Leathermarket Street – after the tanneries and leather market formerly located here[85]
Leigh Hunt Street – after the author Leigh Hunt, who served a short sentence in a nearby prison[86]
Library Street
Lockyer Street
Loman Street – after the former Loman’s Pond located here[87]
London Bridge Street and London Bridge Walk – after the adjacent London Bridge[88]
London Road
Long Lane – presumably simply descriptive
McCoid Way
Magdalen Street – after either William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester in the 15th century, who attended Magdalen College, Oxford,[28] or a 13th-century church here called St Mary Magdalen[89]
Maiden Lane
Maidstone Buildings Mews
Manciple Street – after the character of the manciple in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street[90]
Market Yard Mews
Marshalsea Road – after the former Marshalsea Prison here[91]
Meadow Row
Melior Place and Melior Street – after Melior May Weston, local 18th century property owner[62]
Mermaid Court – after a former inn here of this name[92]
Mermaid Row
Merrick Square – after local 17th century landowner Christopher Merrick[92]
Middle Road
Middle Yard
Milcote Street
Mint Street – after a Tudor-era royal mint located here[93]
Montague Close – after Montague House formerly located here, named for Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu[94][95]
More London
Morgan’s Lane
Morocco Street – named for the local Morocco leather industry[96]
Mulvaney Way
Nebraska Street
Nelson Square – after Admiral Horatio Nelson[97]
Newcomen Street – after the local Newcomen Charity, named for its 17th century founder; it was formerly King Street, after a local inn of this name[98]
New Globe Walk – after the Globe Theatre
Newham’s Row
Newington Causeway and Newington Court – Newington is a now almost obsolete name for the Elephant and Castle area; it means ‘new village/farmstead’ and dates to the early Middle Ages[99][100]
New Kent Road – as this formed the traditional route down to Kent; the ‘New’ section dates from 1751, and is an extension of the Old Kent Road[101]
Nicholson Street
O’Meara Street – after Daniel O’Meara, priest at St George’s Cathedral, Southwark[102]
Ontario Street
Oxford Drive
Pardoner Street – after the character of the pardoner in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street[90][14]
Park Street – after a former park here attached to Winchester House[103][104]
Pepper Street
Perkins Square
Pickford Lane
Pickwick Street – after the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[105]
Pilgrimage Street – as this formed part of the ancient pilgrimage route to Canterbury[106][14]
Plantain Place
Playhouse Court
Pocock Street – after the locally prominent Pocock family[107]
Porlock Street
Porter Street
Potier Street
Potters Fields – after the Roman pottery found near here[108] or a former pottery located here[109]
Price’s Street – after a local builder of this name[110]
Prioress Street – after the character of the prioress in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street[14]
Queen Elizabeth Street
Queen’s Head Yard – after a former grammar school here named for Queen Elizabeth I[111]
The Queen’s Walk – named in the 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II
Quilp Street – after Daniel Quilp, a character in the novel The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[45]
Railway Approach – descriptive, after the adjacent London Bridge station[112]
Redcross Way – after either the Redcross burial ground formerly located here[113] or an inn of this name[114]
Rephidim Street
Risborough Street
Robinson Road
Rochester Walk – after a former house here owned by the bishops of Rochester[115]
Rockingham Street
Roper Lane
Rose Alley – after the Tudor-era Rose Theatre[116][117]
Rotary Street
Rotherham Walk
Rothsay Street
Royal Oak Yard
Rushworth Street – after 17th century politician John Rushworth, who was imprisoned for a period at the nearby King’s Bench Prison[118]
St George’s Circus – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770[119]
St Margaret’s Court – named for the former St Margaret’s church here; it was for a period known as Fishmonger’s Alley, as it belonged to the Worshipful Company of Fishmongers[120]
St Olaf Stairs – probably for the former St Olave’s grammar school located here
St Thomas Street – after St Thomas’ Hospital, formerly located here[121]
Sanctuary Street – as the local mint formerly here claimed the local area as a sanctuary for debtors[122][123]
Sawyer Street – after Bob Sawyer, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[124]
Scoresby Street – unknown; formerly York Street[55]
Scovell Crescent and Scovell Road – after the Scovells, local business family[125]
Shand Street – after Augustus Shand, member of local Board of Works in the late 19th century; it was formerly College Street, by association with the nearby Magdalen Street[126]
Shipwright Yard
Silex Street
Silvester Street
Snowfields
Southall Place
Southwark Bridge Road and Southwark Street – the name Suthriganaweorc[127] or Suthringa geweorche[128] is recorded for the area in the 10th-century Anglo-Saxon document known as the Burghal Hidage[128] and means “fort of the men of Surrey”[127] or “the defensive work of the men of Surrey”.[128] Southwark is recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Sudweca. The name means “southern defensive work” and is formed from the Old English suth and weorc. The southern location is in reference to the City of London to the north, Southwark being at the southern end of London Bridge[129][130]
Sparrick’s Row
Spurgeon Street – after Charles Spurgeon, noted Victorian-era preacher[131]
Stainer Street – after John Stainer, prominent Victorian-era organist[132]
Staple Street
Sterry Street – after the Sterry family, local business owners in the 18th-19th centuries[133]
Still Walk
Stonemasons Court
Stones End Street – as this marked the pointed where the paved surface of Borough High Street ended in former times[134]
Stoney Street – formerly Stony Lane, both simply descriptive names[135][136]
Sturge Street
Sudrey Street
Sumner Buildings and Sumner Street – after Charles Sumner, Bishop of Winchester in the 19th century[137][138]
Surrey Row – after the traditional county here of Surrey[139]
Swan Street – after a former inn here of this name[140]
Tabard Street – after a former inn here of this name[141][14]
Talbot Yard – a corruption of the Tabard Inn, as above[141][14]
Tanner Street – after the tanneries formerly located here; it was formerly Five Foot Lane, after its narrow dimension[142]
Tarn Street
Tay Court
Tennis Street – after tennis courts formerly located here[143]
Theobald Street
Thomas Doyle Street – after Thomas Doyle, a key figure in the building of St George’s Cathedral, Southwark[144]
Thrale Street – after the Thrale family, who owned a brewery here in the 17th century[145][146]
Tiverton Street
Tooley Street – corruption of St Olave’s Church, Southwark, which formerly stood here[147][148]
Toulmin Street – after the Toulmin family, prominent figures in local business and church affairs[149]
Tower Bridge Road – as it leads to Tower Bridge[150]
Trinity Church Square and Trinity Street – after Trinity Church here[151]
Trio Place
Trundle Street
Tyers Gate
Union Street – thought to be as it linked two other streets[152]
Vine Lane – thought to be after a former vineyard here[153]
Vine Yard – thought to be after a former inn here called the Bunch of Grapes[154]
Vinegar Yard – after the vinegar distilleries formerly located here[154]
Wallis Alley
Wardens Grove
Weavers Lane – probably after weavers formerly working from here[155]
Webber Street
Weller Street – after Sam Weller, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square[156]
Weston Street – after local 19th century property owner John Weston[157][62]
White Hart Yard – after a former inn here of this name[158][159]
Whites Grounds
Wild’s Rents
Winchester Square and Winchester Walk – after Winchester House, formerly the London house of the Bishop of Winchester[160][161]
Zoar Street – after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Vauxhall. The area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are Black Prince Road to the north, Kennington Road to the north-east, Kennington Park Road/Clapham Road to the south-east, Miles Street/Fentiman Road to the south, and Wandsworth Road/Nine Elms Lane/river Thames to the west.

Albert Embankment – built in the 1860s over former marshlands, it was named for Albert, Prince Consort, husband of Queen Victoria [1][2]
Ashmole Street – after Elias Ashmole, noted 17th century antiquarian, who lived near here [3]
Auckland Street –
Aveline Street –
Bedser Close – presumably for Alec Bedser, widely regarded as one of the best English cricketers of the 20th century, by association with the nearby Oval Cricket Ground
Black Prince Road – after Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III, who owned this land [4]
Bondway – after the late 18th century developers of this street John and Sarah Bond [5]
Bonnington Square –
Bowling Green Street – this land was formerly a bowling green leased to the owners of the nearby Horns Tavern [6]
Brangton Road –
Cardigan Street –
Carroun Road – after the former Carroun, or Caron, House which stood here [7]
Citadel Place –
Clapham Road – as it leads to the south-west London area of this name
Claylands Place and Claylands Road – after the former brick clay fields located here prior to 1800 [8]
Clayton Street – after the Clayton family, who leased much of this land from the Duchy of Cornwall from the 1660s on [8]
Coney Way –
Cottingham Road –
Courtenay Square and Courtenay Street –
Dolland Street –
Durham Street –
Ebbisham Drive –
Elias Place –
Farnham Royal –
Fentiman Road – after local mid-19th century developer John Fentiman [9]
Glasshouse Walk – after the former Vauxhall Glassworks here, which thrived in the 1700s [10]
Glyn Street –
Goding Street –
Graphite Square –
Hanover Gardens –
Hansom Mews –
Harleyford Road – after local leaseholders the Claytons, whose country house was Harleyford Manor, Buckinghamshire [11]
Harold Place –
Jonathan Street – for Jonathan Tyers and his son, managers of the nearby Vauxhall Gardens for much of the 18th century [12]
Kennington Gardens, Kennington Oval, Kennington Park Road, Kennington Road – after the Old English Chenintune (‘settlement of Chenna’a people’); [13][14] another explanation is that it means “place of the King”, or “town of the King”.[15]
Lambeth Road and South Lambeth Place – refers to a harbour where lambs were either shipped from or to. It is formed from the Old English ‘lamb’ and ‘hythe’.[16][17][18]
Langley Lane –
Laud Street – after William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633-45, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [19]
Lawn Lane – after a former row of houses here called The Lawn, after their grass plots, demolished in 1889-90[20]
Leopold Walk –
Lilac Place –
Loughborough Street –
Magee Street –
Meadow Mews and Meadow Road – after the former meadows here attached to Caron House[21]
Miles Street –
Montford Place –
Newburn Street –
New Spring Gardens Walk – after the former Vauxhall Gardens here [22]
Nine Elms Lane – after a row of nine elm tress which formerly stood along this lane [23]
Orsett Street –
Oval Way – after the adjacent Oval Cricket Ground [13]
Palfrey Place –
Parry Street – after Thomas Parry, 17th century statesman and owner of Copt Hall, a house near here [24]
Pegasus Place –
Randall Road and Randall Row –
Riverside Walk – simply a descriptive name
Rudolf Place –
St Oswald’s Place –
Salamanca Place and Salamanca Street –
Sancroft Street – after William Sancroft, 79th Archbishop of Canterbury, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [25]
Stables Way –
Stanley Close –
Tinworth Street – after George Tinworth, noted ceramic artist for the Royal Doulton ceramics company at Lambeth [26]
Trigon Road –
Tyers Street and Tyers Terrace – for Jonathan Tyers and his son, managers of the nearby Vauxhall Gardens for much of the 18th century [27]
Vauxhall Bridge (and Bridgefoot), Vauxhall Grove, Vauxhall Street and Vauxhall Walk – from the name of Falkes de Breauté, the head of King John’s mercenaries, who owned a large house in the area, which was referred to as Faulke’s Hall, later Foxhall, and eventually Vauxhall; the Birdge opened in 1816[28][29][30]
Wandsworth Road – as it led to the south-west London area of this name [31]
Wickham Street –
Windmill Row –
Worgan Street –
Wynyard Terrace –

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Waterloo. The area has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are the river Thames to the north and west, Blackfriars Road to the east, and Westminster Bridge Road to the south.

Addington Street –
Alaska Street –
Aquinas Street –
Barge House Street and Old Barge House Alley – as this was the former location of the royal barges during Tudor times and after [1][2]
Baron’s Place – after the Baron family, local landowners in the 18th century [3]
Baylis Road – after Lilian Baylis, manager of the Old Vic in the early 20th century [4]
Belvedere Road – after Belvedere House and gardens, opened in 1718 on the site of what is now the Royal Festival Hall [5][6]
Blackfriars Road – named after Blackfriars Bridge in 1769/70; it was formerly Great Surrey Street, reflecting the traditional county it is in [7][8]
Boundary Row –
Brad Street –
Broadwall – after a former earthen dyke located here, marking the western boundary of the parish of Paris Gardens/Christchurch [9][10]
Burdett Street –
Burrows Mews – after the nearby Burrows Buildings, built 1770 [11]
Chaplin Close –
Charlie Chaplin Walk – after Charlie Chaplin, famous 20th century comedian and actor, who was born in South London
Chicheley Street – after Henry Chichele, 15th century archbishop, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [12][13]
Coin Street – unknown, thought possibly after a former mint located here in the time of Henry VIII [14]; it was formerly Prince’s Street until 1893, after the Prince Regent (later George IV) [15][16]
Colombo Street – after Alexander Colombo, 19th century bailiff of the local manor of Paris Gardens [17]
Concert Hall Approach – as it leads to the Royal Festival Hall, built 1951 [18]
Cons Street – after Emma Cons, manager of the Old Vic in the 1880s [19]
Cooper Close –
Coral Street –
Cornwall Road – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall; it was Green Lane prior to 1815 [20][21]
Cottesloe Mews –
Cranfield Row –
The Cut – as when built it cut through what was then open country/marsh [22]
Dibdin Row –
Dodson Street –
Doon Street – [23]
Duchy Place and Duchy Street – as it formed part of the manor of Kennington, which belonged to the Duchy of Cornwall[24]
Emery Street – after the nearby Wellington Mills, which manufactured emery paper in the 19th century; prior to 1893 it was Short Street [25][21]
Exton Street –
Forum Magna Square –
Frazier Street –
Gabriel’s Wharf –
Gerridge Street –
Granby Place –
Gray Street –
Greenham Close –
Greet Street –
Grindal Street – for Edmund Grindal, 16th century archbishop, by association with the nearby Lambeth Palace [26]
Hatfields – as fur hats were formerly made here [27]
Holmes Terrace –
Isabella Street –
Joan Street –
Johanna Street – possibly after local resident and subscriber to the Old Vic Johanna Serres [28]
Jurston Court –
Launcelot Street – after Launcelot Holland, local developer in the 1820s [29]
Leake Court and Leake Street – after John Leake, founder of a local hospital in 1767 [30]
Lower Marsh – as this land was formerly a marsh prior to the 19th century [31]
Lower Road –
Marigold Alley – after a former 18th century inn here called the Marygold, possibly named for the flower, symbol of Mary I [32][33]
Mepham Street – after a 14th Century Archbishop of Canterbury Simon Mepeham
Meymott Street – after the Meymott family, several of whom were stewards of Paris Gardens manor in the 19th century [34]
Miller Walk –
Mitre Road –
Morley Street – after Samuel Morley, benefactor of the Old Vic in the 1880s [35]
Murphy Street –
Paris Garden – the name of the former manor here, it may derive from ‘parish’ or the Old French ‘pareil’ (enclosure), or possibly after 15th century local family the de Parys [36][37]
Pear Place –
Pearman Street –
Pontypool Place –
The Queen’s Walk) – named in the 1977 to commemorate the Silver Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II
Rennie Street – after John Rennie the Elder, prominent 18th century engineer, who designed Waterloo Bridge and Southwark Bridge [38][39]
Roupell Street – after local 19th century property owner John Roupell [40]
St George’s Circus – as this area was formerly called St George’s Fields, after St George the Martyr, Southwark church; the circus opened in 1770 [41]
Sandell Street – after one Mr Sandell, who owned wharehouses here in the 1860s [42]
Secker Street – after Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury 1758-68, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [43]
Short Street – after local early 19th century carpenter Samuel Short [44]
South Bank – descriptive, as it is the south bank of the Thames
Spur Road –
Stamford Street – after Stamford, Lincolnshire, hometown of John Marshall, local benefactor and churchman [45]
Station Approach Road – as it leads to Waterloo station
Sutton Walk –
Tanswell Steet –
Tenison Way – after Thomas Tenison, Archbishop of Canterbury 1695-1715, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [46]
Theed Street –
Tress Place –
Ufford Street –
Upper Ground – as this was formerly a raise earth ditch between the river and Surrey marshland; formerly Upper Ground Street [47][48]
Valentine Place –
Waterloo Bridge and Waterloo Road – the road was built in 1817 shortly after the British victory over Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo [49][50]
Webber Street –
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [51]
West Road –
Whittlesey Street –
Windmill Walk – after the windmills formerly located here when it was countryside; formerly Windmill Street [52]
Wootton Street –
York Road –

This is a list of the etymology of street names in the London district of Westminster. The Westminster area (as distinct from the Council area) has no formally defined boundaries – those utilised here are the generally accepted boundaries of: The Mall and Northumberland Avenue to the north, the river Thames and Victoria Embankment/Millbank to the east, Vauxhall Bridge Road to the south and Buckingham Gate, Buckingham Palace Road and Bressenden Place to the west. For convenience Constitution Hill and Spur Road in the Royal Parks, and the area around the Wellington Arch, are included here, as are the streets in the Leicester Square area.

Westminster
Abbey Orchard Street – after a former orchard here attached to St Peter’s Abbey[1][2]
Abingdon Street – after James Bertie, 1st Earl of Abingdon who owned a house on Dean’s Yard in the 17th century[3][4]
Ambrosden Avenue – unknown[5]
Apsley Way – after the adjacent Apsley House, originally built for Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst (Lord Apsley), later the residence of the Dukes of Wellington[6][7]
Arneway Street – after Thomas Arneway, former benefactor to the local parish’s poor[8][9]
Artillery Place and Artillery Row – after a former nearby artillery practice ground of the 19th century[8][10]
Ashley Place – thought to be after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury, Victorian politician and philanthropist[11]
Atterbury Street – after Francis Atterbury, Dean of Westminster in 1713[12][13]
Barton Street – after 18th century actor Barton Booth, who also attended Westminster School[14][15]
Bennett’s Yard – after Thomas Bennett, 17th century local resident [16]
Bessborough Gardens – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough[17][18]
Birdcage Walk – after the aviaries that were formerly part of St James’s Park[19][20]
Bloomburg Street – after Dr Blomberg, Domestic Chaplain to George IV[13]
Bressenden Place – this street was built in 1962, replacing a small line of shops called Bressenden Row; the origins of the name is unknown [21]
Brewer’s Green – after William Brewer, 17th century gardener here[22]
Bridge Street – presumably as it leads to Westminster Bridge[23]
Broad Sanctuary, Little Sanctuary and The Sanctuary – after the former nearby St Peter’s Sanctuary which offered refuge for those accused of crime[24][25]
Broadway – self-explanatory; it was formerly Broad Place[24][26]
Buckingham Gate, Buckingham Mews, Buckingham Place, Buckingham Palace Road, Palace Place and Palace Street – all named by association with Buckingham Palace, originally built for John Sheffield, Duke of Buckingham[27][28]
Bulinga Street – after Bulinga Fen, formerly here in Saxon times[29][30]
Butler Place – after Nicholas Butler, who built (now demolished) almshouses here in 1675[31]
Canon Row – after the canons of St Stephen’s, the chapel in the former Palace of Westminster, founded in the 12th century[32][33]
Cardinal Walk – presumably by association with the adjacent Westminster Cathedral
Carey Place – after William Carey, headmaster of Westminster School 1803-14[34][13]
Carlisle Place – after George William Frederick Howard, 7th Earl of Carlisle, Viscount Morpeth, who was chiefly responsible for local development in the 1850s[34][35]
Carteret Street – after Sir Edward de Carteret, local 17th century landowner[36][37]
Castle Lane – after a former inn of this name that stood here[38][39]
Cathedral Walk – ‘as it leads to Westminster Cathedral
Catherine Place – unknown[40]
Causton Street – after Thomas Causton, Canon at Westminster[13]
Caxton Street – after William Caxton, creator of the first English printing press in 1476[41][42]
Chadwick Street – after Hannah Chadwick, who left money to local schools in her will[43][42]
Chapter Street – as the land belonged to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster Abbey[13]
Charing Cross – after the Eleanor cross at Charing, from the Old English word “cierring”, referring to a bend in the River Thames[44][45]
Coburg Place –
Cockpit Steps – after a former cock fighting ring on this site[46][47]
Constitutional Hill – obtained its name in the 17th century from King Charles II’s habit of taking “constitutional” walks there. In Strype’s Map, 1720, it is marked “Road to Kensington”. In John Smith’s map of 1724, it is called “Constitution Hill”[48][49]
Cowley Street – after 18th century actor Barton Booth, who also owned land at Cowley in Middlesex[14][15]
Craig’s Court – after Joseph Craig, who built this Court in the 1600s[50][51]
Cureton Street – after William Cureton, noted Orientalist and canon of Westminster 1849-64[52][13]
Dacre Street – after Joan Dacre, 7th Baroness Dacre, who lived in a house on this site in the 15th century[53][54]
Dartmouth Street – after William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s and local resident[55][56]
Dean Bradley Street – after George Granville Bradley, Dean of Westminster 1881-1902[55][13]
Dean Farrar Street – after Frederick William Farrar, rector of St Margaret’s, Westminster and a canon at Westminster in the late 19th century[55][13]
Dean Ryle Street – after Sir Herbert Edward Ryle, Dean of Westminster 1911-25[55][13]
Dean Stanley Street – after Richard Chenevix Trench, Dean of Westminster 1856-64[57][13]
Dean Trench Street – after Arthur Penrhyn Stanley, Dean of Westminster 1864-81[57][13]
Dean’s Yard and Little Dean’s Yard – location of the Dean of Westminster’s house[57][13]
Derby Gate – after William, Lord Derby, who built a mansion on this site in the early 17th century[58][59]
Douglas Street – after William Douglas, Canon at Westminster[13]
Downing Street – after Sir George Downing, 1st Baronet, local landowner of the 17th century[60][61]
Duke of Wellington Place – after the adjacent Apsley House, originally built for Henry Bathurst, 2nd Earl Bathurst (Lord Apsley), later the residence of the Dukes of Wellington[62][7]
Elizabeth Court –
Elverton Street – unknown[63]
Emery Hill Street – after Emery Hill, benefactor to local charities[64][63]
Erasmus Street – after Dutch scholar Desiderius Erasmus, who moved to London in 1498[65][13]
Esterbrooke Street – unknown[66]
Francis Street – after Francis Wilcox, local 19th century landowner; formerly Francis Place[67][68]
Fynes Street – after Charles John Fynes Clinton, who was educated at Westminster School [13]
Gayfere Street – after Thomas Gayfere, mason, who worked on Westminster Abbey in the early 19th century[69][13]
Great College Street, College Mews and Little College Street – after Westminster School, formerly known as St Peter’s College, Westminster[70][71]
Great George Street and Little George Street – after either George II, reigning king when the street was built in 1750[70] or a former inn here called The George[71]
Great Peter Street – after St Peter, patron of Westminster Abbey[72][13]
Great Scotland Yard and Scotland Place – site of a house used by visiting monarchs of Scotland until the 13th century[72]
Great Smith Street and Little Smith Street – after John Smith, circa 1700 builder of these streets[72][73]
Greencoat Place and Greencoat Row – after the Green Coat School which formerly stood here, named for the colour of the school’s uniform, demolished 1877[74][75]
Greycoat Place and Greycoat Street – after the Grey Coat School for Children which moved here in 1701[76][77]
Hatherley Street – after William Page Wood, 1st Baron Hatherley, Victorian era politician and local resident[78][79]
Herrick Street – after Robert Herrick, 17th century poet[80][81]
Hide Place – unknown[81]
Horseferry Road – after a ferry that carries passengers and their horses over to the Thames near here, prior to the construction of Lambeth Bridge[82][83]
Horse Guards Avenue and Horse Guards Road – after the quarters of the Horse Guards, established on Whitehall in 1663[82][83]
Howick Place – thought to be named for Howick Cross, Lancashire [84]
John Islip Street – after John Islip, Abbot of Westminster in Tudor times[85][13]
King Charles Street – after Charles II reigning monarch when the street was built in 1682[86]
King’s Scholars’ Passage – after the King’s Scholars of Westminster School[87][13]
Lewisham Street – after William Legge, 1st Earl of Dartmouth, Viscount Lewisham, Lord Privy Seal in the 1710s and local resident[55][88]
Lord North Street – originally just North Street, as led north from Smith Square, however this was altered in 1936 to commemorate Lord North, Prime Minister 1770-82, so as to avoid confusion with similarly name streets [89]
The Mall – built as a course for playing the game pall mall, fashionable in the 17th century[90][91]
Marsham Street – after Sir Robert Marsham, who inherited this land from Sir Richard Tufton in the 17th century[92][93]
Matthew Parker Street – after Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury 1559-75; it was formerly Bennett Street, as Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (nicknamed Bennett College) owned land here [94][95]
Maunsel Street – after John Maunsel (or Mansell), local 13th century landowner and adviser to King Henry III[94][96]
Medway Street – after the Medway in the Diocese of Rochester, where the deans of Westminster were bishops from 1663 – 1802[97][13]
Millbank – derives its name from a watermill owned by Westminster Abbey that once stood at a site close to present day College Green.[98][99][100]
Monck Street – after Henry Monck, 18th century benefactor to the local parish[101][102]
Montaigne Close –
Morpeth Terrace – after George William Frederick Howard, 7th Earl of Carlisle, Viscount Morpeth, who was chiefly responsible for local development in the 1850s[34][35]
Northumberland Avenue and Northumberland Street – site of the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland[103][104]
Old Palace Yard – after the former Old Palace of Westminster, where the Houses of Parliament now stand[105][106]
Old Pye Street – after Robert Pye, local MP in the mid-17th century[105][106]
Old Queen Street – as it approaches Queen Anne’s Gate[105], or possibly after Elizabeth I; it was formerly just Queen Street [107]
Osbert Street – after Osbert of Clare, Suffolk, prior of the abbey of St Peter’s, Westminster in the 1130s[108][13]
Page Street – after William Page, head of Westminster School 1814-19[109][13]
Palmer Street – after the Reverend James Palmer, who founded (now demolished) almshouses near here in 1656[110][22]
Parliament Square and Parliament Street – after the Houses of Parliament[111]
Perkin’s Rents – after a local landlord by the name of Perkin, recorded in the late 17th century[112][113]
Petty France – after a small French settlement that existed here in the 16th century[114][115]
Pine Apple Court – after a former inn here of this name [116]
Ponsonby Place and Ponsonby Terrace – after John Ponsonby, 5th Earl of Bessborough and later Baron Duncannon of Bessborough[17][18]
Queen Anne’s Gate – as it leads to the gate of the same name, named for Queen Anne, entering into St James’s Park[117][118]
Rampayne Street – after Charles Rampayne, benefactor to local poor schools and hospitals, Mr Rampayne[119][120]
Regency Place and Regency Street – as it was opened by George, Prince Regent (later King George IV) in 1811[121][122]
Richmond Terrace – after a house owned by the dukes of Richmond which formerly stood on this site in the 17th and 18th centuries[123][124]
Rochester Row and Rochester Street – after the Diocese of Rochester, where the deans of Westminster were bishops from 1663 – 1802[125][126]
Romney Street – after Robert, Baron Romney, son of local landowner Sir Robert Marsham[92][93]
Rutherford Street – after Reverend William Rutherford, Headmaster of Westminster School 1883-1901[127][13]
St Ann’s Lane and St Ann’s Street – after a former chapel dedicated to St Anne that formerly stood here[128][129]
St Ermin’s Hill – thought to be a corruption of Hermit Hill, or possibly after St Ermin/Armel, 6th century monk[130]
St James’ Court –
St Margaret Street – after the nearby St Margaret’s, Westminster[131]
St Matthew Street – after St Matthew’s Church, Westminster; it was formerly Duck Lane, as ducks were reared here[132][133]
St Oswulf Street – as this areas was formerly part of the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex; Oswulf was Saxon-era chief here [134]
Seaforth Place – after Seaforth in Scotland, by association with the London Scottish (regiment) formerly bases nearby[135]
Smith Square – after the local 18th century landowner Sir James Smith[136][73]
Spenser Street – after the poet Edmund Spenser, who lived nearby[137][13]
Spring Gardens – after the 17th century pleasure grounds of this name which formerly lay on this site; they were closed in 1660[138][139]
Spur Road –
Stafford Place – after Viscount Stafford, who lived in a house adjacent in the 17th century[140][141]
Stanford Street – unknown[142]
Stillington Street – after Robert Stillington, Bishop of Bath in the 15th century[143][13]
Storey’s Gate – after 17th century St James’s Park birdkeeper Edward Storey, who had a house near here[144][145]
Strutton Ground – corruption of ‘Stourton’, from Stourton House where the local Dacre family lived[146][147]
Thirleby Road – after Thomas Thirlby, Bishop of Westminster 1540-50[148][13]
Thorney Street – after Thorney Island, a former eyot in the Thames[148][149]
Tothill Street – uncertain; the street formerly led to Tothill Fields, thought to be from ‘tote hill’ meaning a look-out hill[150][151]
Tufton Street – after its 17th century builder Sir Richard Tufton[92][93]
Udall Street – after Nicholas Udall, 16th century playwright and headmaster of Westminster School[152][13]
Vandon Passage and Vandon Street – after Cornelius Vandon, 16th century yeoman of the guard who founded almshouses for the poor on adjacent Petty France[152][153]
Vane Street – after Sir Henry Vane the Younger, prominent ally of Cromwell in the Civil War period; Vane was a pupil at the nearby Westminster School[152][13]
Vauxhall Bridge Road – as it approaches Vauxhall Bridge[154][155]
Victoria Embankment – after Queen Victoria, reigning queen at the time of the building of the Thames Embankment[156][157]
Victoria Street – after Queen Victoria, reigning monarch when the street was built in 1850-51[156][157]
Vincent Square and Vincent Street – after William Vincent, Dean of Westminster 1803-15 and headmaster of Westminster School; the square was originally a recreation ground for the school[158][13]
Walcott Street – after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret’s, Westminster in the 1840s[159][160]
Warwick Row – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire[161]
Whitehall, Whitehall Court, Whitehall Gardens and Whitehall Place – after the former Palace of Whitehall on this site, destroyed by fire in 1698[162][163]
Wilcox Place – after Francis Wilcox, local 19th century landowner[67]
Wilfred Street – originally William Street, after Viscount Stafford, who lived in a house adjacent in the 17th century[139]
Willow Place – after the willow trees that were formerly common here[164][165]
Windsor Place – after the Windsor Castle pub formerly located here



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