Hungerford Stairs

Neighbourhood in/near Charing Cross, existed between 1680 and 1862

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Hungerford Stairs

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Neighbourhood · * · WC2N ·
APRIL
23
2017
The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.

Hungerford Market occupied a strip 126 feet wide, extending 465 feet northward towards the Strand. The market had been built in 1680 and rebuilt in 1831 and was named after the Hungerford family of Farleigh Castle, near Bath in Somerset.

The site had become the property of the Hungerford family in 1425, when it was acquired from Sir Robert Chalons and his wife Blanche by Sir Walter Hungerford (later Baron Hungerford), Speaker of the House of Commons and Steward of the Household of King Henry V. It finally passed down the family to Sir Edward Hungerford (1632–1711), created a Knight of the Order of the Bath at the coronation of Charles II.

Before its rebuilding, Hungerford Market was called "a disgrace to the metropolis" (Mogg’s New Picture of London and Visitor’s Guide to it Sights, 1844). Mogg further says: "The present elegant and convenient structure was erected from designs by Mr. Fowler in 1831 and 1833."

The market consisted of three divisions. The upper one formed a quadrangle, flanked by colonnades with dwellings and shops. The centre - a great hall - was formed of four rows of granite columns, with arches springing from them to support the roof. Hungerford Market specialised in food: meat, poultry, fruit, vegetables, butter and eggs.

By 1830 the replacement of Old London Bridge meant that fishing boats could then come further upstream to deliver their catch. So the owners of the market hoped to break the monopoly of Billingsgate Market by providing a more convenient supply of fish for the West End. Hence a lower quadrangle was accessible by a spacious flight of steps and contained a fish-market.

Down another set of steps - Hungerford Stairs - was a wharf, about 200 feet long with steps down to the water, where landings could be made. The formation of floating piers at the quay facilitated the arrival and departure of numerous steam boats that left during the summer months every quarter of an hour, for the City, Westminster, and Vauxhall, and at other times for Greenwich and Woolwich.

When the site of the market was sold to the South Eastern Railway, the railway company demolished both it and the stairs, building Charing Cross railway station over the top.


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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828</SPAN>

Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

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Johnshort   
Added: 7 Oct 2017 21:07 GMT   

Hurley Road, SE11
There were stables in the road mid way - also Danny reading had a coal delivery lorry.

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

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Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

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Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

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Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

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Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

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Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
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Ackermann’s Rudolph Ackermann (20 April 1764 in Stollberg, Saxony – 30 March 1834 in Finchley) was an Anglo-German bookseller, inventor, lithographer, publisher and businessman.
Charing Cross Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square
Embankment Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including, indeed, ’Embankment’.
Hungerford Bridge Hungerford Bridge is a rail bridge crossing the Thames into Charing Cross station.
Hungerford Stairs The Hungerford Stairs were the entrance point to Hungerford Market from the River Thames. They are now the site of Charing Cross railway Station.
Northumberland House Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, the Dukes of Northumberland.
Shipley’s Drawing School 101 The Strand was an art school from 1750 until 1806.
The Adelphi The Adelphi is a small district surrounding the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street.
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NEARBY STREETS
Adam Street, WC2N Adam Street is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Adelaide Street, WC2R Adelaide Street was named for Queen Adelaide, Consort to King William IV.
Adelphi Terrace, WC2N Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.
Agar Street, WC2N Agar Street is named after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough
Baywillow Place, NW11 Baywillow Place is a location in London.
Bear Street, WC2H Bear Street is a streetname with two possible derivations.
Bedford Street, WC2E Bedford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Bedford Street, WC2R Bedford Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Bedfordbury, WC2N Bedfordbury is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Belvedere Road, SE1 Belvedere Road is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Bollinder Place, EC1V Bollinder Place is location of London.
Brydges Place, WC2N Brydges Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Buckingham Street, WC2N Buckingham Street is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets.
Bull Inn Court, WC2R Bull Inn Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Bundocks Walk, E3 Bundocks Walk is location of London.
Buross Street, E1 Buross Street is a location in London.
Cannon Street, WC2N Cannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Carting Lane, WC2R Carting Lane is thought to be named after the carts that brought goods to and from the wharf formerly located here.
Casson Square, SE1 Casson Square is a location in London.
Cecil Court, WC2N Cecil Court is a pedestrian street with Victorian shop-frontages.
Chandos Place, WC2R Chandos Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Charing Cross Mansions, WC2H Charing Cross Mansions is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Charing Cross, SW1A Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma.
Cockspur Street, SW1A Cockspur Street is possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights.
Community House, SW1A A street within the postcode
Concert Hall Approach, SE1 Concert Hall Approach is one of the streets of London in the SE1 postal area.
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Duncannon Street, WC2N Duncannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Durham House Street, WC2N Durham House Street was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in medieval times.
Elmhurstreet Villas, SW1A A street within the SE15 postcode
Embankment Place, WC2N Embankment Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Embankment, WC2R Embankment is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Exchange Court, WC2R Exchange Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Exeter Street, WC2R Exeter Street is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Festival Pier, A street within the SE1 postcode
Fullwood’s Mews, SW1A A street within the 77381 postcode
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Goddard Way, E14 Goddard Way lies within the E14 postcode.
Golden Jubilee Bridge, WC2N Golden Jubilee Bridge is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Heathcock Court, WC2R Heathcock Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Henrietta Street, WC2E Henrietta Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron.
Hop Gardens, WC2N Hop Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A Horse Guards Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Horse Guards Parade, SW1A Horse Guards Parade dates to the time of Henry VIII.
Horse Guards Road, SW1A Horse Guards Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Hungerford House, WC2N Residential block
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor.
Ivybridge Lane, WC2N Ivybridge Lane is named after a former ivy-covered bridge that crossed an old watercourse on this spot; the bridge was demolished sometime before 1600.
John Adam Street, WC2N John Adam Street is named after John Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother Robert in the 1760s.
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Residential block
Lancaster Place, WC2R Lancaster Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Leicester Place, WC2H Leicester Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Leicester Square, WC2H Leicester Square is a central tourist attraction of London.
Leicester Street, WC2H Leicester Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
Lighthouse View, SE10 Lighthouse View is a location in London.
Maiden Lane, WC2R Maiden Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Maple Leaf Walk, WC2R Maple Leaf Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
May’s Court, WC2N May’s Court is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Millet Place, E16 Millet Place is location of London.
New Row, WC2E New Row is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Northumberland Avenue, SW1A Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east.
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N The part of Northumberland Avenue nearest to Trafalgar Square lies in the SW1 rather than WC2 postcode.
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland.
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street gets its name from William III, Prince of Orange - the reigning king when the street was built.
Pall Mall East, SW1A Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square.
Pelican Estate, SW1A A street within the SE15 postcode
Queen Matilda Mews, E13 Queen Matilda Mews lies within the E13 postcode.
Robert Street, WC2N Robert Street is named after Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development with his brother John in the 1760s.
Saint Martin’s Lane, WC2N Saint Martin’s Lane is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Saint Martin’s Court, WC2H Saint Martin’s Court is a road in the WC2H postcode area
Saint Martin’s Place, WC2N Saint Martin’s Place is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Savoy Court, WC2R Savoy Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Hill, WC2R Savoy Hill is located at a site originally called Savoy Manor.
Savoy Place, WC2N Savoy Place is a location in London.
Savoy Place, WC2R Savoy Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Savoy Place, WC2R Savoy Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2E postal area.
Savoy Street, WC2R Savoy Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Savoy Way, WC2R Savoy Way is located on the former site of the Savoy Palace, built for Peter II, Count of Savoy in 1245.
Shield Street, SE15 Shield Street is a location in London.
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street - named for Thomas Wriothesley, 4th Earl of Southampton and landowner.
Southampton Street, WC2E Southampton Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Southbank Centre Square, SE1 Southbank Centre Square is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Southbank, SE1 Southbank is a road in the SE9 postcode area
Spring Gardens, SW1A Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace.
St Jamess Chambers, SW1Y St Jamess Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Martins Court, WC2H St Martins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Martins Lane, WC2N St Martins Lane is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martins Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martins Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Martins Street, WC2H St Martins Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St. James’s Drive, SW1A A street within the 78257 postcode
St. Kilda’s Road, SW1A A street within the N16 postcode
Strand Lane, WC2R Strand Lane is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Strand Underpass, WC2R Strand Underpass is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Strand, WC2N Strand is a location in London.
Strand, WC2R Strand (or the Strand) runs just over 3⁄4 mile from Trafalgar Square eastwards to Temple Bar, where the road becomes Fleet Street inside the City of London.
Strand, WC2R Strand is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Strand, WC2R Strand is one of the streets of London in the WC2A postal area.
Studio 5, SW1A A street within the E1 postcode
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place.
Suffolk Place, SW1Y Suffolk Place is a road in the SE2 postcode area
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site.
The Arches, WC2N The Arches is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court, WC2R The Edmund J. Safra Fountain Court is a road in the WC2R postcode area
The Gallery, SW1Y The Gallery is a road in the E20 postcode area
The Macadam Building Street, WC2R The Macadam Building Street is a location in London.
The National Gallery, SW1Y The National Gallery is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Queen’s Steps, SE1 The Queen’s Steps is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the WC2R postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 This is a street in the SE1 postcode area
The Queen’s Walk, SE1 The Queen’s Walk is a road in the SE1 postcode area
The Strand, WC2R The Strand is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Terrace, SW1A The Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Thomas Hardy Mews, SW16 Thomas Hardy Mews is a location in London.
Thunderer Walk, SW1A A street within the postcode
Trafalgar Square, SW1Y Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Victoria Embankment Gardens, WC2N Victoria Embankment Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Victoria Embankment, SW1A Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Victoria Embankment, WC2N Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Victoria Embankment, WC2R Victoria Embankment is one of the streets of London in the WC2R postal area.
Victoria Embankment, WC2R Victoria Embankment is a road in the SE1 postcode area
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Wallis Walk, E16 Wallis Walk is location of London.
Wards Place, E14 Wards Place is location of London.
Warwick House Street, SW1A Warwick House Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Watergate Walk, WC2N Watergate Walk is named after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House.
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge is a road in the WC2R postcode area
Waterloo Bridge, SE1 Waterloo Bridge, as well as being the bridge itself, lends its name to the southern approach road.
Whitcomb Street, WC2H Whitcomb Street - named after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer.
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Gardens, SW1A Whitehall Gardens is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall, SW1A Whitehall is recognised as the centre of the government of the United Kingdom.
William IV Street, WC2R William IV Street runs from Charing Cross Road to the Strand.
York Buildings, WC2N York Buildings marks a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich.
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site.


Charing Cross

Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square

Charing Cross gives its name to several local landmarks, including Charing Cross railway station and is named after the now demolished Eleanor cross that stood there, in what was once the hamlet of Charing. It was where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile.

It was one of twelve places where Eleanor’s coffin rested overnight during the funeral procession from Lincolnshire to her final resting-place at Westminster. At each of these, Edward erected an Eleanor cross, of which only three now remain.

The original site of the cross has been occupied since 1675 by an equestrian statue of King Charles I. A Victorian replacement, in different style from the original, was later erected a short distance to the east outside the railway station.

Formerly, until 1931, Charing Cross also referred to the part of what is now Whitehall lying between Great Scotland Yard and Trafalgar Square. At least one property retains a Charing Cross postal address: Drummonds Bank, on the corner of Whitehall and The Mall, which is designated 49 Charing Cross (not to be confused with the separate Charing Cross Road).

Since the second half of the 18th century, Charing Cross has been seen by some as the exact centre of London, being the main point used for measuring distances from London.

The railway station opened in 1864, fronted on the Strand with the Charing Cross Hotel. The original station building was built on the site of the Hungerford Market by the South Eastern Railway, designed by Sir John Hawkshaw, with a single span wrought iron roof arching over the six platforms on its relatively cramped site.

Charing Cross tube station has entrances located in Trafalgar Square and The Strand. The station is served by the Northern and Bakerloo lines, originally separate tube stations called Strand and Trafalgar Square, and provides an interchange with the National Rail network. The station was served by the Jubilee Line between 1979 and 1999, acting as the southern terminus of the line during that period.



LOCAL PHOTOS
William Shakespeare
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Transmission
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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Aquarium
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Tottenham Court Road (1927)
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
William Shakespeare
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Waterloo Bridge on an 1810 map.
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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Buses outside the National Gallery in Trafalgar Square.
Credit: Stockholm Transport Museum
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Aquarium
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The Royal Opera House, Bow Street frontage, with the statue of Dame Ninette de Valois in the foreground
Credit: Russ London
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London Hippodrome in 2017
Credit: Ethan Doyle White
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Sectional view of Wyld's Great Globe, which stood in Leicester Square, London 1851–62
Credit: Illustrated London News
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The Strand front of Northumberland House (1752) The Percy Lion is atop the central façade and the statue of Charles I at right survives to this day.
Credit: Giovanni Canaletto
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The original, Brunel-built Hungerford Bridge.
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