Trafalgar House, CR0

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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(51.37902 -0.0988, 51.379 -0.098) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Block · Croydon · CR0 ·
July
25
2021

Trafalgar House is a block on Bedford Park.

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find derivations wanting here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

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Waithman Street – after Robert Waithman, Lord Mayor of London 1823-33 [City of London]
Wakefield Mews and Wakefield Street – after a former local pub, the Pindar of Wakefield [Bloomsbury]
Wakley Street – after 19th century surgeon and social reformer Thomas Wakley [Finsbury]
Walbrook and Walbrook Wharf – after the Walbrook stream which formerly flowed here, possibly with reference to the Anglo-Saxon 'wealh' meaning 'foreigner' (i.e. the native Britons, or 'Welsh') [City of London]
Walcot Square – after Edmund Walcot, 17th century owner of this land [Lambeth]
Walcott Street, SW1 – after Reverend MEC Walcott, curate of the St Margaret's, Westminster in the 1840s
Waldegrave Road, Teddington (and the nearby park and gardens) were named after Frances Waldegrave, wife of the 7th Earl Waldegrave who lived at Strawberry Hill House in the 19th century on the road.
Walker Close, N11 The Walkers of Southgate were a prominent local family who owned Arnos Grove (now Southgate Beaumont) on nearby Cannon Hill. The street is located near the better known Arnos Grove tube station.
Walnut Tree Walk – after the walnut tress formerly prominent here [Kennington/Lambeth]
Wandsworth Road – as it led to the south-west London area of this name [Vauxhall]
Wardour Mews – named after local 17th century landowners the Wardour family, and formerly called Colman Hedge Lane after a nearby field; the section south of Brewer Street was formerly Prince Street prior to 1878, in parallel with Rupert Street [Soho]
Wardour Street, W1 Archibald Wardour was the architect of several buildings on the street
Wardrobe Place and Wardrobe Terrace – after the Royal Wardrobe which formerly stood here until destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 [City of London]
Warner Street and Warner Yard – after Robert Warner, local 18th century landowner [Clerkenwell]
Warren Mews – after Anne Warren, wife of local 18th century landowner Charles Fitzroy [Fitzrovia]
Warren Street, W1 Anne Warren was the wife of Charles FitzRoy, 1st Baron Southampton, the land owner responsible for the development of the area
Warwick Court – site of the townhouse of Gray’s Inn lawyer Robert Rich, Baron Rich who was created Earl of Warwick in 1618 [Holborn]
Warwick House Street – formerly approached Warwick House, built in the 17th century for Sir Philip Warwick [St James]
Warwick Lane, Warwick Passage and Warwick Square – after the Neville family, earls of Warwick, who owned a house near here in the 1400s; formerly Old Dean’s Lane, after a house here resided in by the Dean of St Paul’s [City of London]
Warwick Place North, Warwick Row, Warwick Square, Warwick Square Mews, Warwick Way, West Warwick Place – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire [Pimlico/Victoria]
Warwick Row – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land in Warwickshire [Westminster]
Warwick Street – unknown; formerly Dog Lane, later Marrowbone/Marylebone Street [Soho]
Wat Tyler Road, SE10 Wat Tyler was the rebel who launched the Peasants' Revolt in 1381
Water Lane – after a former watergate that stood here by the Thames; formerly Spurrier Lane [City of London]
Water Street – formerly ran to the waterline of the Thames, prior to the building of the Thames Embankment [Holborn]
Watergate – after a watergate which stood here on the Thames [City of London]
Watergate Walk – after a former watergate built in 1626 for George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham as an entrance for the former York House [Strand]
Waterhouse Square – after Alfred Waterhouse, architect of Holborn Bars, also known as the Prudential Assurance Building, which surrounds the square [Hatton Garden]
Waterloo Bridge and Waterloo Road – the road was built in 1817 shortly after the British victory over Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo [Waterloo]
Waterloo Place – after the Battle of Waterloo which ended the Napoleonic Wars [St James]
Watling Court and Watling Street – corrupted from the old name of Athelingestrate (Saxon Prince Street), by association with the more famous Roman Watling Street [City of London]
Watson’s Mews – after John Watson, local 18th century leaseholder [Marylebone]
Waverton Street – after Waverton, Cheshire, where local landowners the Grosvenors also held land [Mayfair]
Weavers Lane – probably after weavers formerly working from here [Southwark]
Webbs Road Hillingdon Is one of a number of short roads in Yeading originally formed of social housing and named after Labour politicians. Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb were prominent social reformers.
Wedgewood Mews – after Josiah Wedgewood, Georgian-era manufacturer of high-quality pottery and a campaigner for social reform, who owned a pottery near here [Soho]
Weighhouse Street – after the King’s Weigh House Chapel, which moved here its site above the King’s Weight House in the City in 1891; before this it was known as Robert Street, after Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster, and before that as Chandler Street after the local chandler trade [Mayfair]
Welbeck Street – after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland [Marylebone]
Welbeck Way – after Welbeck Abbey in Nottinghamshire, seat of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland [Marylebone]
Well Court – after the numerous wells formerly located in this area [City of London]
Weller Street – after Sam Weller, a character in the novel The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens, by association with Dickens Square [Southwark]
Wellington Road, St John's Wood Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington The road was developed from about 1816, following Wellington's victory at the Battle of Waterloo.
Wellington Street – after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington [Covent Garden]
Wells Mews – after Joseph (or George) Wells, local 17th century farmer [Fitzrovia]
Wells Street – after Joseph (or George) Wells, local 17th century farmer [Fitzrovia]
Werrington Street - after Werrington, Cornwall, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford held land; formerly Clarendon Street [Somers Town]
Wesley Street – after Charles Wesley, hymn author, who is buried nearby [Marylebone]
West Central Street – named in 1894, after the recent innovation of postcodes (this being the boundary between WC1 and WC1) [Covent Garden]
West Eaton Place - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), whose family seat is Eaton Hall, Cheshire [Belgravia]
West Halkin Street - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned Halkyn Castle in Wales [Belgravia]
West Halkin Street is named after Halkyn Castle, originally a Grosvenor family property in Flintshire. [Belgravia]
West Harding Street – after local 16th century property owner Agnes Harding, who bequeathed the surrounding area to the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths for the upkeep of widows [City of London]
West Mews – a shortening of its pre-1936 name Warwick Place Mews West [Pimlico/Victoria]
West Poultry Avenue – after the meat trade here at Smithfield Market [City of London]
West Square – after its late 18th century owners the West family [Kennington/Lambeth]
West Square – after its late 18th century owners the West family [Lambeth]
West Street – unknown, possibly it was on the western boundary of St Gile's parish; formerly Hog Street [Covent Garden]
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [Lambeth]
Westminster Bridge Road – as it leads to Westminster Bridge [Waterloo]
Westmoreland Place – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Westmoreland Terrace – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Weston Rise – after John Weston, who built this road in the 1790s [Clerkenwell]
Weston Street – after local 19th century property owner John Weston [Southwark]
Weymouth Mews and Weymouth Street – after Lady Elizabeth Bentinck, Viscountess Weymouth, daughter of William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, who owned this estate [Marylebone]
Wheatley Street – after Francis Wheatley, Victorian artist who lived in the area [Marylebone]
Whetstone Park – built by William Whetstone in 1636 [Holborn]
Whidborne Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s [Bloomsbury]
Whiskin Way – after John Whiskin, local landowner/builder in the 19th century [Clerkenwell]
Whitcomb Court - after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer [Leicester Square]
Whitcomb Street - after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer [Leicester Square]
White Hart Court – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
White Hart Street – by connection with local landowner Edward the Black Prince, son of Edward III, whose crest was a white hart [Kennington/Lambeth]
White Hart Yard – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
White Horse Street – after a former inn of this name at this site, named for the Royal emblem of the House of Hanover [Mayfair]
White Horse Yard – after a former inn of this name [City of London]
White Kennett Street, EC3 White Kennett Bishop of Peterborough (1707), was previously rector of the nearly St Botolph's Aldgate
White Lion Court – after a former inn of this name, destroyed by fire in 1765 [City of London]
White Lion Hill – this formerly led to White Lion Wharf, which is thought to have been named after a local inn [City of London]
Whitecross Street – after a white cross which stood near here in the 1200s [Finsbury]
Whitefriars Street – after the Carmelite order (known as the White friars), who were granted land here by Edward I [City of London]
Whitehall, Whitehall Court, Whitehall Gardens and Whitehall Place – after the former Palace of Whitehall on this site, destroyed by fire in 1698 [Westminster]
Whitehaven Street – Broadley Street near here was formerly Earl Street, and the surrounding streets were given earldom-related names in the early 19th century; this was named for the Earls of Carlise and was originally Little Carlisle Street, later changed after Whitehaven, Cumberland [Lisson Grove]
Whitfield Place – after George Whitefield, prominent 18th century religious figure, who founded a tabernacle near here in 1756 [Fitzrovia]
Whitfield Street, W1 George Whitefield Builder of Whitefield's Tabernacle, in the vicinity, in 1756
Whitgift Street – after John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury 1583-1604, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Whitgift Street, Croydon John Whitgift Archbishop of Canterbury (1583-1604)  lived at Croydon Palace, and is buried in Croydon Minster.
Whittaker Avenue, Richmond John Whittaker Ellis was the first Mayor of Richmond, who bought a building adjacent to the road which became the town hall
Whittaker Street – after its 1830 builder John Whittaker [Belgravia]
Whittington Avenue – after Richard Whittington, former Lord Mayor of London [City of London]
Wicklow Street – possibly from Wicklow in Ireland [Clerkenwell]
Widegate Street – thought to be after a gate that formerly stood on this street; formerly known as Whitegate Alley [City of London]
Wigmore Place – after Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wigmore Street – after Wigmore Castle in Herefordshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wilberforce Road William Wilberforce British politician, a philanthropist and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade
Wilcox Place – after Francis Wilcox, local 19th century landowner [Westminster]
Wild Court – corruption of ‘Weld’, after Henry Weld who lived in Weld House on this site in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Wild Street – corruption of ‘Weld’, after Henry Weld who lived in Weld House on this site in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Wilfred Street – originally William Street, after Viscount Stafford, who lived in a house adjacent in the 17th century [Westminster]
William IV Street – named after William IV, reigning king when the street was laid out by John Nash in 1831 [Covent Garden]
William Barefoot Drive, SE9 Named for a prominent local politician, who was Mayor of Woolwich three times
William Morris Close, E17 William Morris spent his childhood at the nearby Water House, which is now the William Morris Gallery
William Mews and William Street – after William Lowndes of the local landowning Lowndes family [Belgravia]
William Road – after the later William IV, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Willoughby Highwalk – presumably after Sir Francis Willoughby, who is buried in the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church [City of London]
Willoughby Street – after GP Willoughy, mayor of Holborn Borough in the 1910s [Bloomsbury]
Willow Place – after the willow trees that were formerly common here [Westminster]
Wilmington Square and Wilmington Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who also had the title Baron Wilmington [Clerkenwell]
Wilton Crescent Mews, Wilton Place, Wilton Row, Wilton Street and Wilton Terrace - after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Eleanor Egerton was the wife of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster [Belgravia]
Wilton Crescent, SW1 Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton Second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster; the road forms part of the Grosvenor estate.
Wilton Road – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family Estate; Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster married Eleanor Egerton, daughter of Thomas Egerton, 1st Earl of Wilton [Pimlico/Victoria]
Wimpole Mews – after Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Wimpole Street – after Wimpole Hall in Cambridgeshire, seat of Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Winchester Square – after Winchester House, formerly the London house of the Bishop of Winchester [Southwark]
Winchester Street – this land was formerly part of the Grosvenor family estate; as the last of their lands to be developed they had seemingly run out of eponymous names from themselves, so they Winchester Walk – after Winchester House, formerly the London house of the Bishop of Winchester [Southwark]
chose various pleasant-sounding aristocratic titles, of which this is one [Pimlico/Victoria]
Windmill Street – after the windmill that formerly stood near here in the 18th century [Fitzrovia]
Windmill Walk – after the windmills formerly located here when it was countryside; formerly Windmill Street [Waterloo]
Windsor Place, SW1 - after the Windsor Castle pub located near to here
Wine Office Court – after an office here that granted licenses to sell wine in the 17th century [City of London]
Winnett Street – named after local business owner William Winnett in 1935; prior to this it was Upper Rupert Street [Soho]
Withers Place – after William Withers, 18th century property owner [Finsbury]
Woburn Place, Woburn Square, Woburn Walk and Upper Woburn Place – after Woburn Abbey, principal seat of local landowners the dukes of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Woffington Close, KT1 Peg Woffington was ab 18th-century actress who performed in Teddington, near where the road is located.
Wood Street – as wood and fire logs were sold here as part of the Cheapside market [City of London]
Woodbridge Street – after Thomas Seckford, Elizabethan court official, who left land nearby in his will for the building of an almshouse; Sekford was born in Woodbridge, Suffolk [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wood's Mews – after Richard Wood, who built this street in 1731 [Mayfair]
Woodstock Mews – after William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland, Viscount Woodstock [Marylebone]
Woodstock Street – after either Woodstock, Oxfordshire, location of to Blenheim Palace, home of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [23] or Thomas Woodstock, 18th century builder [Mayfair]
Woolf Mews – presumably after the author and local resident Virginia Woolf [Bloomsbury]
Wormwood Street – after the wormwood formerly grown here for medicine [City of London]
Wren Road, SE5 The road was built on the grounds of a former house said to have been occupied by Sir Christopher Wren
Wren Street – after prominent architect Sir Christopher Wren [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wrestler’s Court – after a former Tudor-era house here of this name [City of London]
Wyclif Street – after John Wycliffe, noted 14th century religious reformer; by association with the former nearby Smithfield Martyrs’ Memorial Church [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wyndham Mews, Wyndham Street and Wyndham Yard – after Anne Wyndham, wife of local landowner Henry Portman [Marylebone]
Wynyatt Street – corruption of ‘Wynyates’; after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, who owned land at Compton Wynyates in Northamptonshire [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Wythburn Place – after Wythburn Fells, Cumberland, by association with the nearby Great Cumberland Place [Marylebone]
Yardley Street – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton, one of whom was born at Yardley Hastings, Northamptonshire [Clerkenwell/Finsbury]
Yarmouth Place – after Francis Charles Seymour-Conway, 3rd Marquess of Hertford, Earl of Yarmouth who lived near here in the 19th century [Mayfair]
York Bridge - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Buildings – a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich – in the reign of Queen Mary it was acquired by the archbishops of York and named ‘York House’; York Place was formerly ‘Of Alley’, after George Villiers [Strand]
York Gate - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Place – a house was built on this site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich – in the reign of Queen Mary it was acquired by the archbishops of York and named ‘York House’; York Place was formerly ‘Of Alley’, after George Villiers [Strand]
York Terrace East - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Terrace West - after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
York Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, brother of King George IV [Marylebone]
Yorkshire Grey Yard – named after a local inn of this name in the 18th century, presumably referring to the breed of horse [Holborn]
Young Street, W8 - Named for Thomas Young, developer of the area
Young's Buildings, EC1 – after Francis Young, local 18th century property owner
Zoar Street, SE1 – after the former Zoar Chapel here, named for the Biblical Zoara


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply

NEARBY STREETS
Ainsworth Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Apollo House, CR9 A street within the CR0 postcode
Bedford Park, CR9 Bedford Park is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Bedford Place, CR0 Bedford Place is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Billinton Hill, CR0 Billinton Hill was built to service East Croydon station running up from Cherry Orchard Road.
Bridge Place, CR0 Bridge Place is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Caithness Walk, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Centrale Shopping Centre, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Charrington Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Chartwell Close, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Church Path, CR0 Church Path is an old road buried under the Whitgift Centre.
Clarendon Road, CR0 Clarendon Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Cobblestone Place, CR0 Cobblestone Place is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Derby Road, CR0 Derby Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Dingwall Road, CR0 Dingwall Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Dingwall Road, CR9 Dingwall Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Drayton Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Exchange Court, CR0 Exchange Court is a building on Bedford Park.
Farquharson Road, CR0 Farquharson Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Grenaby Road, CR0 Grenaby Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Ground Floor, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Hood Close, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Keats Apartments, CR0 Keats Apartments is one of the blocks of Saffron Square.
Kidderminister Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Kidderminster Road, CR9 Kidderminster Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Lambert’s Place, CR9 Lambert’s Place is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Lansdowne Road, CR0 Lansdowne Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Lansdowne Road, CR0 Lansdowne Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Lennard Road, CR0 Lennard Road is a street of West Croydon.
Leonard Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Lewen Close, CR0 Lewen Close is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Lower Mall, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Mead Place, CR0 Mead Place is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Milton Avenue, CR0 Milton Avenue is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Milton Road, CR0 Milton Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Montague Road, CR0 Montague Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Newgate, CR9 Newgate is part of the one-way system of central Croydon.
North End, CR9 North End is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Nova Road, CR0 Nova Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Oakfield Road, CR0 Oakfield Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Otterbourne Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Panton Close, CR0 Panton Close is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Parson’s Mead, CR0 Parson’s Mead is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Poplar Walk, CR9 Poplar Walk is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Riverside Mews, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Rodney Close, CR0 Rodney Close is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Ruskin Road, CR0 Ruskin Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Ruskin Square, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Saffron Square, CR0 Saffron Square is a town square and high-rise building - the Saffron Tower became the tallest building in Croydon.
St James’s Road, CR0 St James’s Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
St. James Road, CR0 St. James Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
St. Michael’s Road, CR9 St. Michael’s Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
St. Peters Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Stanton Road, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Station Road, CR0 Station Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Sydenham Road, CR0 Sydenham Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Sydenham Road, CR0 Sydenham Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Tamworth Road, CR0 Tamworth Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Tavistock Court, CR9 A street within the CR9 postcode
Tavistock Grove, CR0 Tavistock Grove is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Tavistock Road, CR0 Tavistock Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Tavistock Road, CR0 Tavistock Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Tennyson Apartments, CR0 Tennyson Apartments is located on Saffron Square.
The Island, CR0 The Island (also known as Newgate Tower, and previously ISLAND and IYLO) is a residential skyscraper in Croydon.
The Wend, CR9 The Wend is a road in the CR2 postcode area
Underhill Court, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Upper Mall, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Viceroy Court, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Walpole Road, CR9 Walpole Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Wellesley Court Road, CR9 A street within the CR0 postcode
Wellesley Grove, CR9 Wellesley Grove is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Wellesley Parade, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Wellesley Passage, CR9 Wellesley Passage is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Wellesley Passage, CR9 Wellesley Passage is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Wellesley Road, CR0 Wellesley Road is a location in London.
Wellesley Road, CR9 Wellesley Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Wellesley Road, CR9 Wellesley Road is a road in the CR9 postcode area
Whitgift Almshouses, CR9 A street within the CR9 postcode
Whitgift Car Park, CR9 A street within the CR0 postcode
Woburn Court, CR0 A street within the CR0 postcode
Woburn Road, CR0 Woburn Road is a road in the CR0 postcode area
Woburn Road, CR0 A street within the CR9 postcode
Wyvell Close, CR0 Wyvell Close lies within the CR0 postcode.

NEARBY PUBS
Croydon District Masonic Hall This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Gipsy Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Porter And Sorter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bedford Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Ship Of Fools This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Windmill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Croydon

Centrale, an oddly-named tram stop in the centre of Croydon, was born from Centrale, the oddly-named shopping centre.

On 2 April 2004, the new Centrale shopping centre opened in central Croydon. A tram stop was planned to be built as part of the building of the shopping centre, but trams went straight through this station until 10 December 2005.

This was mainly due to rises in the construction cost of the stop and the worry that adding approximately 45 seconds onto tram journeys through Central Croydon would disrupt the timetable and additional trams would have to be added.

However, when the tram stop finally opened, there were insignificant timetable disruptions.


LOCAL PHOTOS

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