The Underground Map


 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  OPENSTREETMAP  GOOGLE MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.52638 -0.07434, 51.537 -0.211) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Shoreditch ·
APRIL
12
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Collingwood Street, E2
Collingwood Street was at the heart of the Old Nicol rookery. In 1680, John Nichol of Gray’s Inn leased just over four acres of gardens for 180 years to a London mason, Jon Richardson, with permission to dig for bricks. The land became built up piecemeal with houses. Many of the local streets were named after Nichol.

At least 22 houses were built in Old Nichol Street in 1801-2, probably on the sites of 17th-century ones.

An area of this was named Friar’s Mount probably after James Fryer who farmed it in the 1720s. Friar’s Mount was sold to Sanderson Turner Sturtevant, a tallow chandler who was leasing out ground on the west side of Turk Street by 1804. A John Gadenne was building on the west side of Mount Street in 1807. Mount Street, from Rose Street to Virginia Row, existed by 1806. Nelson Street and Collingwood Streets ran west from Mount Street by 1807.

A garden - Kemp’s Garden - was taken for building at about the same time. Mead built nine houses in Mead Street in 1806 and others were un...

»more

MARCH
31
2021

 

Howard Street, WC2R
Howard Street ran from Surrey Street to Arundel Street until 1974 Norfolk Street and Howard Street were built over the grounds of Arundel House which had been the property of the Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk.

Howard Street was demolished in the 1970s to build Arundel Great Court.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2021

 

Ayres Street, SE1
Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street Ayres Street changed name in tribute to Alice Ayres - also immortalised in Postman’s Park in the City. Ayres lost her life whilst saving three children from a fire in Union Street in 1885.

John Strype mentions Whitecross Street in his 1720 ’Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster’. He called it "a pretty clean Street, but ordinary Built and Inhabited." It is unknown how long before 1710 that the street was built.

The White Cross Cottages were built in 1890 by social reformer Octavia Hill and designed by Elijah Hoole, as model social housing. They include a hall with interior decoration by Walter Crane.

The dense grain of local small buildings was in part eroded after the Second World War. As redevelopment occurred, larger blocks, occupied by single uses, replaced the Georgian and Victorian houses, shops and warehouses. This is particularly evident in the area between Ayres Street and Southwark Bridge Road.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2021

 

Alpha Grove, E14
Alpha Grove runs from Strafford Street to Tiller Road Alpha Grove ran right through to the West India Dock fence dock - its cranes can be seen at the end of the road. When built in the 1800s, Alpha Road followed a section of the old Island path, Dolphin Lane.

Albert Terrace and Alfred Terrace were rows of houses in Alpha Road.

Alpha Road was renamed Alpha Grove in 1939, and was seriously damaged during WWII.

In 1964 the LCC declared this site as the Manilla Street Clearance Area, and this north end of Alpha Grove became a part of Manilla Street in the Barkantine Estate.

Alpha Road Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Chapel, Alpha Grove Community Centre) was built in 1887. An additional hall was added in 1926. The buildings were converted into a community centre in the 1970s.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2021

 

Aldgate High Street, EC3N
Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London’s history Aldgate High Street was closely located to where the eastern part of the original Roman Wall, and in the medieval period, it led to town of Colchester in Essex.

Because of its connection to places outside London, Aldgate High Street was vital to the geography of medieval London. Unfortunately, any archaeological remnants of the Roman gate have been obscured, and there is no evidence of its precise location, but is believed to have straddled Aldgate High Street, the gate’s northern edge beneath the pavement of current address of 1-2 Aldgate High Street, and its southern edge beneath 88-89 Aldgate High Street.

There is some dispute over the etymology and meaning of "Aldgate," but various historians have provided some theories. The earliest record of Aldgate has it listed as East Gate, which makes sense, given its location as the easternmost gate on the Wall.

Another interpretation of its current name, "Ale Gate," indicates that an ale-ho...
»more





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
OCTOBER
31
2015

 

The Brittania
The Brittania was situated on the corner of Clarendon Road and Portland Road, W11. Latterly known as "The Clarendon", it became a restaurant in the 2010s. It had been in business as a public house since about 1869.

The former Britannia public house at 123a Clarendon Road was marred by the shopfront that was added to it (which is now a restaurant), but the high late Victorian pub architecture can be seen clearly on the upper floors. The house next door at No. 121 used to be the Clarendon Mission Hall in the early 1900s.
»read full article


OCTOBER
29
2015

 

Rackham Street, W10
Rackham Street is a road that disappeared from the streetscape of London W10 in 1951. During the night of 27/8 September 1940, after Nazi incendiary bombs, the central part of Rackham Street become a huge crater (though only one person was killed).

As the Luftwaffe aimed for the railway line and gas works, the nearby Princess Louise Hospital was also bombed three times and around a hundred incendiaries hit the St Charles convent and grounds.

In the early 1950s, the rest of Rackham Street was demolished to make way for the Balfour of Burleigh estate. Rackham Street left no trace - not even a name.
»read full article


OCTOBER
26
2015

 

Aldermaston Street, W10
Aldermaston Street is a lost street of North Kensington It was one of the streets which disappeared after the Westway was built though it didn’t lie directly on the route. Instead its footprint covers what is now the Westway Sports Centre.
»read full article


OCTOBER
25
2015

 

Adair Road junction with Southam Street (1932)
A wet day in London W10. This image shows the junction of Adair Road and Southam Street on a very wet day in 1932. The site was the future position of Southam House, built after the Second World War.
»read full article


OCTOBER
23
2015

 

Down Street
Down Street, also known as Down Street (Mayfair), is a disused station on the London Underground, located in Mayfair. It was opened in 1907 by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway. It was latterly served by the Piccadilly line and was situated between Dover Street (now named Green Park) and Hyde Park Corner stations.

The station was little used and trains often passed through it without stopping. Its lack of patronage coupled with its proximity to other stations resulted in its closure in 1932. During the Second World War it was used as a bunker by prime minister Winston Churchill and his War Cabinet. The station building survives today and is close to Down Street’s junction with Piccadilly. Part of it is now converted to a retail outlet.
»read full article


OCTOBER
22
2015

 

Cherwell Street, SW8
Cherwell Street was built by Frederick Haynes in the mid-Victoria era. In 1862, a speculator called Frederick Haines moved to build on a plot of land called "9/10 Cross Road Shot". Five parties were involved: Joseph Clarke, Riverhill near Sevenoaks; Arthur Pott of Tunbridge Wells; William Williams of Lincolns Inn Fields; Henry Stevenson, Shepherds Bush; and Francis Woodgate, captain in the Life Guards, of Sevenoaks.

There was no expense in laying out roads, although drainage would of course have been required. Houses were then built on plots by builders.

1-6 Culvert Road were leased to George Bateman, a Brixton builder, in Nov. 1862 to March 1863. An extra house - la - was inserted and leased to Robert Rice on 23 December 1867.

1-5 Carlton Cottages in the main road were leased to Henry Hunt, builder on 20 January 1866.

Haines acquired two parcels of enclosed land, occupied by Henry Shailer and Graham on 16 April 1862, involving the same parties as at Culvert Road.

The estate pla...
»more


OCTOBER
21
2015

 

1879 Royal Agricultural Society Show
Washout summers are not only a modern phenomenon The 1879 Royal Agricultural Society of England’s annual show was held on an area which later became Queen’s Park.

The Kilburn show was opened on 30 June 1879 by the Prince and Princess of Wales. The 100 acre site was chosen for its proximity to the railway network, Queen’s Park Station having opened on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham, just in time to facilitate the movement of heavy machinery and stock.

By the 1870s the annual shows had become major events and the Kilburn show was to be the largest every held. It saw an entry of 11,878 implements, 2879 livestock entries and over 187,000 visitors. There were many international entries and there was a Royal Box which was part of an arena seating 3000 people, the winning cattle and horses were paraded here every day.

The Royal Agricultural Society of England was formed in 1838 to promote the potential of science for raising agricultural productivity. Annual agricu...
»more


OCTOBER
18
2015

 

Royal Garden Hotel
Royal Garden Hotel is a 5 star hotel in London, England. It is located in the heart of Kensington, on Kensington High Street, overlooking Kensington Palace and gardens. The palace, Hyde Park and the Royal Albert Hall can all be seen from the hotel.

What is now the Royal Garden Hotel was originally built in the 1800s under the name of the Palace Hotel with a completely different image and layout. As part of the war effort in the 1900s it was taken over and used as the headquarters for the Woman’s Royal Voluntary Service.

In the 1960s, the hotel was demolished and completely rebuilt under the design of Colonel Richard Seifert. After five years of construction the hotel re-opened in 1965 under the Royal Garden Hotel brand, as it stands today. In 1966 it hosted the official reception celebrating England’s victory in the World Cup final.

Read the Royal Garden Hotel entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


OCTOBER
17
2015

 

College Crescent, NW3
College Crescent was built by the Eyre family. The Eyre family were local landowners and became keen to promote building. In 1794 a plan was drawn up on the model of Bath, with a crescent, circus and a square. The plan was never executed but from 1802 development on the Eyre estate was directed by John Shaw, a young architect inspired by the town-planning ideals of the late 18th century. In 1803-4 he exhibited views of a projected circus and in 1807 building began on the Marylebone portion.

In 1819 Col. Eyre began the first of several attempts to promote the construction of a public road through his estate, ultimately successful in the Finchley Road Act of 1826. Finchley New Road and Avenue Road, the southern part of which existed by 1824, went northward into the Hampstead portion of Eyre’s land and were built by 1829. The Swiss Cottage tavern was built at the apex of the two roads by 1841.

College Crescent was then laid out in the 1840s, and by 1852 the first thirteen houses had been built there. T...
»more


OCTOBER
11
2015

 

Chrisp Street Market
Chrisp Street Market is the central marketplace and town centre of Poplar. It was the first purpose-built pedestrian shopping area in the United Kingdom, rebuilt as part of the 1951 Festival of Britain. It features shops, a prominent clock tower, pubs, cafes, flats, and 80 market stalls.
»read full article


OCTOBER
9
2015

 

Ellerdale Road, NW3
Ellerdale Road was added to the streetscape of Hampstead in 1874. The architect T. K. Green built no. 2 Ellerdale Road, ’a defiantly Gothic house’ for himself in c. 1890. Several houses in Ellerdale Road have a sunflower motif, including no. 6 which Richard Norman Shaw built for himself in 1875 and occupied until his death in 1912.
»read full article


OCTOBER
8
2015

 

University College School
University College School, generally known as UCS, is an independent school charity situated in northwest London. The school was founded in 1830 by University College London and inherited many of that institution’s progressive and secular views. According to the Good Schools Guide, the school "Achieves impressive exam results with a relaxed atmosphere." UCS moved away to new purpose-built buildings in Frognal in Hampstead in 1907, which were opened by HM King Edward VII with the Archbishop of Canterbury in attendance on July 27.
»read full article


OCTOBER
7
2015

 

St Mary’s Town and Country School
St. Mary’s Town and Country School was an independent, non-denominational, co-educational progressive day and boarding school. It was founded in Belsize Park, London in 1937. It closed at the end of 1982.

The school was owned and run by Mrs Elisabeth Paul PhD (née Selver), assisted by her husband Henry Paul, both of German-Jewish origin. In 1937 they bought the school, originally called St. Mary’s School, at 1 Belsize Avenue. The school curriculum was biased toward the learning of languages and the arts from an early age, and the pupils, aged 4 to 18 years, were primarily the children of artists, musicians, writers, film producers and actors.
»read full article


OCTOBER
7
2015

 

Wembley F.C.
Wembley Football Club is an English semi-professional football club. They currently play in the Spartan South Midlands League Premier Division. They play in red and white and are nicknamed "The Lions". This is due to the lion in the centre of the coat of arms for the old Borough of Wembley.

The club was formed in 1946 in the post-Second World War football boom, as many in the area felt it wrong that the area which held the English National Stadium didn’t have its own senior football team. It was formed from two local Junior clubs: Sudbury Rangers and Sudbury Ratepayers. As a result of their efforts, the club took the motto "A Posse Ad Esse" ("From Possibility To Reality").





Read the Wembley F.C. entry on the Wikipedia...
»read full article


OCTOBER
6
2015

 

Upper Richmond Road, SW15
Upper Richmond Road has long connected Putney with areas around Richmond. Putney village, originally clustered around the church near the bank of the River Thames, developed very rapidly during the nineteenth century. In 1849 it was said to be only partly paved - although as early as 1656 thirteen parishioners of Putney petitioned Cromwell to be allowed to pave the High Street, which they said was long and broad and could not be made by gravelling.

The westward continuation of Putney High Street, which lies at right angles to the river, is called Putney Hill, and ascends towards Wimbledon Common. High Street is crossed above Putney station by Upper Richmond Road, which leads from East Putney station to Sheen and Richmond, being joined at Barnes Common by Lower Richmond Road.

East Sheen along the road from Putney became a manor in its own right around 1500. East Sheen village was centred around Milestone Green, which lay where Upper Richmond Road now crosses Sheen Lane. The village had only 26 houses in 1617.

Aro...
»more


OCTOBER
6
2015

 

St Stephen’s Church
St. Stephen’s is a former church building, sited on Rosslyn Hill at its junction with Pond Street, a steep slope adjacent to the Royal Free Hospital. It was designed in the Neo Gothic style by Samuel Sanders Teulon and he considered it the best of the 114 churches he designed, calling it his "mighty church" – it was also the most expensive of them. He accepted the commission to design it after Sir Thomas Maryon Wilson, Lord of the Manor of Hampstead, offered Hampstead Green to be the site for a new church in 1864. From 1864 to 1867 funds were raised (the projected cost was estimated as £7,500; the final sum was actually £27,000).

Work began in January 1869, with the foundation stone being laid May that year and consecration by John Jackson the Bishop of London occurring on 31 December. It was fully complete by 1870, but was continually prone to subsidence due to its hilly site.

It held up to 1200 worshippers at its peak.

By the later 1960s concerns had been raised on structural grounds and, with maintenance costs rising and its congregation declining, it was closed for worship in 197...
»more


OCTOBER
5
2015

 

St Mary’s Church
St Mary’s Chapel, now known as St Mary’s Church, is a Grade II* listed Roman Catholic church. St Mary’s was the first Catholic church to be built in Hampstead after the English Reformation of the 16th century. The Abbé Jean-Jacques Morel, a refugee from the French Revolution, was its first pastor. The little chapel was completed in less than a year and opened its doors to worshippers for the first time in August 1816.

By this time with the final defeat of Napoleon, the majority of French refugees in Hampstead had returned to France and the congregation numbered about a hundred on a regular basis although these numbers were increased in the summer months by itinerant Irish hay-makers who worked in the fields around the village. Education was a priority for the Abbé Morel and he undertook the religious education of both boys and young women at several private Catholic schools in Hampstead. Sometime after the building of the chapel in Holly Place, two schools, one for boys and the other for girls, were set up next to the presbytery and was supported by subscrip...
»more


OCTOBER
4
2015

 

St John, Hampstead
St John-at-Hampstead is a Church of England parish church dedicated to St John the Evangelist. Hampstead was granted to the Benedictine monks of Westminster Abbey by charter in 986 but, though it is unlikely they did not place a church there soon afterwards, the first concrete record of one comes from 1312 (when it was recorded that John de Neuport was its priest) and 1333 (through a mention of a Chapel dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary). On the Dissolution of the Monasteries, the Abbey was replaced by the Bishop of Westminster, with its first and only holder Thomas Thirlby also serving as St John’s rector. Thirlby appointed Thomas Chapelyne to be St John’s vicar in 1545, but the see was abolished in 1551 by Edward VI, with the manor and benefice of Hampstead being granted to Sir Thomas Wrothe. The church of this era was part in stone and part in timber, and also had a minor wooden tower.

As Hampstead grew in popularity and size as an out-of-town health resort, the small existing church grew less and less adequate and derelict, being finally declared unusa...
»more


OCTOBER
3
2015

 

South Hampstead High School
South Hampstead High School is an independent day school. The school was founded and is still supported by the Girls’ Public Day School Trust (GPDST). It is a through school for girls from 4 – 18 and operates over three sites. The Senior School is currently housed on a temporary campus whilst a brand new state-of-the-art building is under construction. The Junior School operates from two old houses nearby and the Sixth Form has its own building, Oakwood House. Entry into the school is selective at ages 4+,7+,11+ and 16+ and there is always a high demand for places.

The school was founded in 1876 as the ninth school established by the Girls’ Public Day School Trust (the largest group of independent schools in the UK). It started life as the St John’s Wood School with only 27 pupils. From 1946 until the late 1970s it was a girls’ direct grant grammar school, whereby around half the intake were paid for by the local council. It opened in its present form on 30 September 1980.
»read full article


OCTOBER
2
2015

 

Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel
The Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel is a place of worship and a member of the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarians. The chapel, which stands on Rosslyn Hill, was at first a simple wooden structure. Said to have been built in 1692 by Isaac Honeywood who lived in the adjoining mansion, the Red Lion Hill meeting house was first replaced in 1736 and then, having become unsafe, rebuilt in brick on roughly the same site in 1828.

The current building (using the old brick chapel as its hall) was built from 1862 to 1885 in the Neo Gothic style. Two of the building’s stained-glass windows are by Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris and another is by Henry Holiday. It holds four John Flaxman reliefs and plaques to previous congregants, such as Helen Allingham (the first woman artist admitted to the Royal Academy). Its stone arches and pointed ceiling vault give it an excellent acoustic, making it a popular recording venue.
»read full article


OCTOBER
1
2015

 

Queen’s Crescent Market
Queen’s Crescent Market is one of London’s oldest street markets, and is still held every Thursday and Saturday. The market sells food, discounted clothing and a wide variety of household products. It has capacity for more than 90 stalls.

Many traders run stalls that have been passed from generation to generation. This is in contrast to the nearby and considerably more famous Camden markets, which primarily attract tourists and those from other parts of London (Inverness Street Market was a traditional produce market in Camden Town for a century, but in 2013 the last produce stall closed, leaving only tourist stalls like the other Camden markets). Aesthetically Queen’s Crescent market is a mixture, with pretty plain white houses sitting side by side with large council estates, some of which sit in beautifully landscaped grounds.
»read full article


PREVIOUSLY ON THE UNDERGROUND MAP...

Print-friendly version of this page


w:en:Creative Commons
attribution share alike
Unless otherwise given an attribution, images and text on this website are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic licence.
If given an attribution or citation, any reuse of material must credit the original source under their terms.
If there is no attribution or copyright, you are free:
  • to share - to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to remix - to adapt the work
Under the following conditions:
  • attribution - You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).
  • share alike - If you alter, transform, or build upon this work, you may distribute the resulting work only under the same or similar license to this one.

1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.