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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Dollis Hill ·
August
14
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Dollis Hill Lane, NW2
Dollis Hill Lane is an ancient throughway. At the time of the Enclosure Award of 1816, the area of a 16th century farm at Oxgate, another farm at the top of Dollis Hill, a mansion known as Neasden House and some 75 fields resulting from the enclosure. The region was typical open farming country and the only road across the area was Dollis Hill Lane which traversed it from east to west. Dollis Hill House was built in 1825 and the railway in 1868. By 1895 there was a golf-course to the south west.

Residential building really started in the south-east of Dollis Hill from 1907-08.

Of the major landmarks constructed in the first quarter of the century, the two most noteworthy are St. Andrew’s Hospital, built in 1913, and the Post Office Research Station which rose in 1923 on the site of the old Dollis Hill Farm. In the mid-1920s Edgware Road was developed and there was some small-scale building in the middle of Dollis Hill.

So far a large part of the area still retained much of its rur...

»more

AUGUST
11
2020

 

Braddyll Street, SE10
Braddyll Street dates from 1852 Many street names east of Greenwich relate to the Durham coal field. Col. Braddyll was one of the partners in the South Hetton Coal Company. Messrs Braddyll & Co. also then owned Dalden-le-Dale Colliery.

The locomotive ’Bradyll’ still exists and is believed to be the oldest surviving locomotive with six-driving wheels. Bradyll was built by Timothy Hackworth at his Soho Works in Shildon, County Durham in 1840. The locomotive can be seen in the National Railway Museum’s location at Shildon.

The street was labelled ’Braddyle Street’ on the Stanford 1860s map and its alignment followed the modern Thornley Place before it was later extended south.
»read full article


AUGUST
10
2020

 

Lea Bridge
Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the ...
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AUGUST
4
2020

 

Beaumont Street, W1G
Beaumont Street is the location of the King Edward VII Hospital and the Marylebone Library Beaumont Street runs from Marylebone High Street to the junction of Westmoreland Street and Weymouth Street. It was named after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century.

The street’s story began soon after the Marylebone Gardens closed in 1776, the line of the northern half being mostly laid out over the site of the gardens. The southern part was already partly developed by then.

Building leases were granted to the Thomas Neales, senior and junior, and John White, among others in the late 1780s. The street was advertised as being in as "pleasant and as healthy a situation as in the country".

Shopkeepers and professionals moved in including a lady perfumer, surgeon, cheesemonger and a bookseller-stationer. Additionally there was a teacher of writing and accounting whose manuscript collection was open to the public.

The first residents in the 1790s included a botanical painter and a celebrated harpist, ...
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JULY
23
2020

 

Thorold Road, IG1
Thorold Road dates from 1889-90 The name Thorold Road might reflect a Lincolnshire association since, while not a village name, there are two pubs called ’The Thorold Arms’ - one in Marston and the other in Harmston. The Reverend Henry Thorold lived in a vicarage in the former. A housemaster at Lancing College, he wrote for the acclaimed ’Shell Guides’ to the counties of England.

More likely is the theory that the name is derived from James Edwin Thorold Rogers (1823-1890) who was Liberal MP for Southwark. He had been influential in the ’National Liberal Land Company’. The company was renamed the ’National Land Company’ in 1893.

While not landowners in Ilford, the Balfour Group and the National (Liberal) Land Company had close political links and it was the Balfour Group - trading locally as Hobbs and Company - which developed Thorold Street.

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NOVEMBER
26
2015

 

Lansdowne Road, W11
Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill. Lansdowne Road was built in the 1840s and were named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham, where the developers, Pearson Thompson and Richard Roy, had been active. Lansdowne Walk was known first as Queen’s Terrace and then as Hanover Terrace; and Lansdowne Rise was until 1937 known as Montpelier Road (Montpelier was a popular street name after the Napoleonic wars, as the French sent captured British officers there on parole, and many British prisoners-of war returned with fond memories of the place; Montpellier was also the name of another district of Cheltenham developed by Pearson Thompson).

Lansdowne Road had three separately named terraces: Lansdowne Villas (numbers 2-12 evens); Lansdowne Terrace; and Moreton Villas. They were subsumed into Lansdowne Road in 1863.
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NOVEMBER
24
2015

 

Westbourne Grove, W11
Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill. Westbourne Grove runs from Kensington Park Road in the west to Queensway in the east, crossing over Portobello Road. It contains a mixture of independent and chain retailers, and has been termed both "fashionable" and "up-and-coming".

The development of Westbourne Grove began in the 1840s and proceeded from the east (which lay in Bayswater) to the west, where it became the principal east-west artery into the Ladbroke Estate. The far western end of the street only became known as Westbourne Grove relatively recently in 1938, having previously been called Archer Street. In 1929, the novelist A.J. Cronin opened his own medical practice at 152 Westbourne Grove, which was put up for sale in 2007.

Westbourne Grove takes its name from Westbourne Green - a settlement that developed to the west of the bourne that later took the name River Westbourne.

There was a small settlement to the north of what is now Westbourne Grove at Westbourne Green. It ha...
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NOVEMBER
23
2015

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road. The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
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NOVEMBER
21
2015

 

Stanley Gardens, W11
Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s. Stanley Gardens was probably named after the noted politician Edward Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who became Prime Minister in 1852. There used also to be a Stanley Gardens Mews, which ran down the north side of St Peter’s church.

Stanley Gardens is perhaps the prime example of the Ladbroke Estate planners’ love affair with vistas. This short street looks west towards the two magnificent central houses in Stanley Crescent and to the east there is an equally magnificent view of St Peter’s church. As so often on the Ladbroke estate, the end-of-terrace houses on both sides are round the corner in Stanley Crescent and Kensington Park Road.

The original design for the Ladbroke estate, based on concentric circles, was made in the 1820s by Thomas Allason, the architect-surveyor employed by James Weller Ladbroke when he inherited the estate and decided to develop it. Allason’s design did not survive in its original form, but the layout of Stanley Gardens,...
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NOVEMBER
18
2015

 

Rosmead Road, W11
Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road. Chichester Road was renamed after the 1st Baron Rosmead, a distinguished British colonial administrator (chiefly in the Far East and South Africa), who died in 1898.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
16
2015

 

The Victoria (1920s)
The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it ’conveniently burned down’. Later, in its incarnation as The Narrow Boat, the landlords were a husband and wife: Wally and Renee. Wally was a taxi driver as well as a landlord.

The toilet for the pub was down a stretch of notorious steep steps.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
15
2015

 

Duke of Cornwall (The Ledbury)
The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant. The Duke Of Cornwall was situated at 127 Ledbury Road. This former Courage pub adopted the name of the Ledbury Arms following the closure of a pub of the same name at 40 Ledbury Road and closed c. 2005.

The Ledbury restaurant opened on the site in 2005, under head chef Brett Graham. As such, it has been featured in S.Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants. It is the sister restaurant of The Square, a two Michelin star restaurant in Mayfair, with the same backers investing in both restaurants.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
8
2015

 

The Foresters
A lost pub of London W10 One local remembers living in Octavia House as a child which was opposite the pub on Southern Row.

"Bookmakers used to stand outside taking people’s bets" she said. "I remember the horse from the yard behind West Row being taken into the pub one day as a laugh and they messed all over the floor ,the landlord didn’t think it was funny!"
»read full article


NOVEMBER
7
2015

 

Lads of the Village
One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road. The Lads of the Village, later "The Lads" and more recently "Frames" found itself situated on the corner of Middle Row and Kensal Road.

The pub was frequented by the father of Labour politician Alan Johnson who ran off with the barmaid.
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NOVEMBER
6
2015

 

Clayton Arms
A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town. The Clayton Arms was situated at 9 West Row and was sometimes known by its alternative title: The Little House.

There was a yard at the back called Clayton Yard.

It first appears on documents dating from 1849 and appears to have finished business in the 1950s.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
5
2015

 

Queen’s Park Library
Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents. The Artizans’, Labourers’, and General Dwellings Co. built the Queen’s Park Estate from the 1875 onwards on temperance principals. While the Estate was well-provisioned in most amenities, there were no public houses.

Instead, the minds of the new residents were to be improved and space was reserved on the corner of Harrow Road and Fourth Avenue for a public library.

This was built by the local council.
»read full article


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