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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Borough ·
JANUARY
20
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Mint Street, SE1
Mint Street, an ancient Southwark street, (now) runs off Marchelsea Road. Mint Street dates from before 1679 in which year Thomas Lant married the daughter of Sir Edward Bromfield, and thus acquired an interest in a house called Suffolk Place. By then, Mint Street is shown on Morden and Lea’s map of 1682 and was closely developed.

The Mint Street area had been known as ’The Mint’. It was a slum area with privileges for debtors until The Mint in Southwark Act 1722 removed these rights. The area remained a slum until the 19th century.

The St Saviour’s Union Workhouse at Mint Street is thought to have provided Dickens with the model for the scene in Oliver Twist where the starving boy "asks for more". The workhouse in Mint Street dated back to 1729. In October 1731 it was reported that “there are now in it 68 Men, Women, and Children, of which all that are able, spin Mop-Yarn, and Yarn for Stockings, which are knit by the Women; and beside this Work, 25 Children are taught to read, and say their Catechism.”


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DECEMBER
25
2020

 

Barnes Cray
Barnes Cray is located on the Greater London border with Kent, bordering Dartford Barnes Cray is named for the Barne family, who owned land here in the mid-18th century.

Up until the Victorian era it was a hamlet a kilometre downstream of Crayford where no more than sixteen homes were clustered. A calico-printing works drew water power from the culverted River Wansunt in early Victorian times, being later adapted for the manufacture of rubber goods, then felt and finally Brussels carpets. This carpet mill was demolished by 1890 and Barnes Cray House, the next largest building, was cleared by 1933, ending its days as a nursing home.

The remnants of the settlement became absorbed into Crayford with the building of a garden village to facilitate the expansion of Vickers’ armaments factory during the 1915 to 1919 period. Six hundred cottages were built in a variety of styles.

In 1920 the area became part of the Crayford Urban District of Kent (having previously been in Dartford Rural District).

Following Wo...
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DECEMBER
24
2020

 

Dartford
Dartford lies at the heart of the Thames Gateway, one of the largest growth areas in the UK Dartford is going through a period of great change with a rising population and extensive new commercial and residential development.

Originally a Roman settlement, Dartford is an old market town connected in history with Wat Tyler’s rebellion of 1381. Dartford was known at various times in its history as Darentford, Tarentford and Dorquentford.

The town centre boasts notable historic buildings. Holy Trinity Church dates from Norman times and has a mediaeval mural. The Royal Manor Gatehouse dates from the time of Henry VIII.

There is a museum and library in the town centre, which also has a wide range of shopping facilities. Two weekly markets are held in the town on Thursdays and Saturdays.

A number of ancient parishes lie to the south of the town, each of which has its own links with English history. Evidence of this can be seen in the many fine churches and old buildings that remain. Darenth Country Pa...
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DECEMBER
23
2020

 

Parsifal Road, NW6
Parsifal Road runs from Finchley Road to Fortune Green Road The land had belonged to the Flitcroft estate and the name Parsifal Road was approved in 1883.

New College was built at the eastern end in 1887. Between 1890 and 1897, 13 large detached and semi-detached houses were built in Parsifal Road.
»read full article


DECEMBER
22
2020

 

Barra Hall Park
Barra Hall Park is an 11 hectare formal park situated near the centre of Hayes Barra Hall was originally a manor house, and formerly known as Grove House. In the late eighteenth century it was home to Harvey Combe, who became Lord Mayor of London in 1799. In 1871 was bought by Robert Reid, an auctioneer and surveyor who claimed descent from the Reids of Barra. After enlarging and refacing the building he changed its name to Barra Hall in 1875.

On 20 December 1923, Hayes Urban District Council bought Barra Hall and its grounds from then owner Ethel Penfold for £5700 in order to use it as a town hall.

The Barra Hall building was officially opened as town hall on 23 February 1924 and its grounds became a municipal park with playground, tennis courts and a paddling pool opened by music hall star Jessie Matthews. Barra Hall Park features ornamental lawns, recreational grass areas, rose and shrub beds, seasonal bedding and mature trees.
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NOVEMBER
26
2015

 

Lansdowne Road, W11
Lansdowne Road is a street in Notting Hill. Lansdowne Road was built in the 1840s and were named after the Lansdowne area of Cheltenham, where the developers, Pearson Thompson and Richard Roy, had been active. Lansdowne Walk was known first as Queen’s Terrace and then as Hanover Terrace; and Lansdowne Rise was until 1937 known as Montpelier Road (Montpelier was a popular street name after the Napoleonic wars, as the French sent captured British officers there on parole, and many British prisoners-of war returned with fond memories of the place; Montpellier was also the name of another district of Cheltenham developed by Pearson Thompson).

Lansdowne Road had three separately named terraces: Lansdowne Villas (numbers 2-12 evens); Lansdowne Terrace; and Moreton Villas. They were subsumed into Lansdowne Road in 1863.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
24
2015

 

Westbourne Grove, W11
Westbourne Grove is one of the main roads of Notting Hill. Westbourne Grove runs from Kensington Park Road in the west to Queensway in the east, crossing over Portobello Road. It contains a mixture of independent and chain retailers.

The development of Westbourne Grove began in the 1840s and proceeded from the east (which lay in Bayswater) to the west, where it became the principal east-west artery into the Ladbroke Estate. The far western end of the street only became known as Westbourne Grove relatively recently in 1938, having previously been called Archer Street. The rest of the road was under the moniker Westbourne Grove West for a while. In 1929, the novelist A.J. Cronin opened his own’ medical practice at 152 Westbourne Grove - this was put up for sale in 2007.

Westbourne Grove takes its name from Westbourne Green - a settlement that developed to the west of the bourne that later took the name River Westbourne.

There was a small settlement to the north of what is now Westbourne Grove at We...
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NOVEMBER
23
2015

 

Vernon Yard, W11
Vernon Yard is a mews off of Portobello Road. The name Portobello Road derived from the 1739 capture of Puerto Bello in Central America from the Spaniards by Admiral Vernon (1684-1757) with only six ships.

Vernon Yard is similarly named - it was known as Vernon Mews until 1932. It is a small L-shaped mews with its entrance under an archway between 117 and 119 Portobello Road. The terrace of houses in Portobello Road that backs onto the mews was originally called Vernon Terrace, and the mews served these houses.

Vernon Yard would have been built at the same time as Vernon Terrace, in the first half of the 1850s. The 1863 Ordnance Survey map shows two numbered units (Nos. 1 and 2) at the southern end of Vernon Yard; a further eight units (Nos. 3-10) along the western side) and one (No. 11) at the northern end. These were almost certainly stable blocks with accommodation above. On the eastern side, the map shows a number of unnumbered units which were probably warehouses or stabling belonging to the ad...
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NOVEMBER
21
2015

 

Stanley Gardens, W11
Stanley Gardens was built in the 1850s. Stanley Gardens was probably named after the noted politician Edward Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who became Prime Minister in 1852. There used also to be a Stanley Gardens Mews, which ran down the north side of St Peter’s church.

Stanley Gardens is perhaps the prime example of the Ladbroke Estate planners’ love affair with vistas. This short street looks west towards the two magnificent central houses in Stanley Crescent and to the east there is an equally magnificent view of St Peter’s church. As so often on the Ladbroke estate, the end-of-terrace houses on both sides are round the corner in Stanley Crescent and Kensington Park Road.

The original design for the Ladbroke estate, based on concentric circles, was made in the 1820s by Thomas Allason, the architect-surveyor employed by James Weller Ladbroke when he inherited the estate and decided to develop it. Allason’s design did not survive in its original form, but the layout of Stanley Gardens,...
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NOVEMBER
18
2015

 

Rosmead Road, W11
Rosmead Road, W11 was originally called Chichester Road. Chichester Road was renamed after the 1st Baron Rosmead, a distinguished British colonial administrator (chiefly in the Far East and South Africa), who died in 1898.
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NOVEMBER
16
2015

 

The Victoria (Narrow Boat)
The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down. The ’Vic’ was the first building on the right when crossing the canal going north along Ladbroke Grove.

Its start date as a hostelry is unknown - the name (both "Victoria Arms" and "Queen Victoria") suggests that it was of 19th century origin though it is not marked as a pub on the 1900 map.

The Victoria was a very small establishment. It stood just next to a ’dingy’ staircase and alleyway which formed a short cut between Ladbroke Grove and what was Church Place – handy for the bus stop for the number 18 bus along the Harrow Road. The toilet for the pub was down a stretch of notorious steep steps. Also down the stairs was a small beer garden.

Church Place is now called St John’s Terrace and the right of way is still there.

In later years it became called “The Narrow Boat” and was a Fullers pub. As The Narrow Boat, the landlords were a husband and wife: Wally and Renee. Wally was a taxi driv...
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NOVEMBER
15
2015

 

Duke of Cornwall
The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant. The Duke Of Cornwall was situated at 127 Ledbury Road. This former Courage pub adopted the name of the Ledbury Arms following the closure of a pub of the same name at 40 Ledbury Road and closed c. 2005.

The Ledbury restaurant opened on the site in 2005, under head chef Brett Graham. As such, it has been featured in S.Pellegrino World’s 50 Best Restaurants. It is the sister restaurant of The Square, a two Michelin star restaurant in Mayfair, with the same backers investing in both restaurants.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
8
2015

 

The Foresters
The Foresters - a lost pub of London W10 One local remembers living in Octavia House as a child which was opposite the pub on Southern Row.

"Bookmakers used to stand outside taking people’s bets" she said. "I remember the horse from the yard behind West Row being taken into the pub one day as a laugh and they messed all over the floor ,the landlord didn’t think it was funny!"
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NOVEMBER
7
2015

 

Lads of the Village
One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road. The Lads of the Village, later "The Lads" and more recently "Frames" found itself situated on the corner of Middle Row and Kensal Road.

The pub was frequented by the father of Labour politician Alan Johnson who ran off with the barmaid.
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NOVEMBER
6
2015

 

Clayton Arms
A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town. The Clayton Arms was situated at 9 West Row and was sometimes known by its alternative title: The Little House.

There was a yard at the back called Clayton Yard.

It first appears on documents dating from 1849 and appears to have finished business in the 1950s.
»read full article


NOVEMBER
5
2015

 

Queen’s Park Library
Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents. The Artizans’, Labourers’, and General Dwellings Co. built the Queen’s Park Estate from the 1875 onwards on temperance principals. While the Estate was well-provisioned in most amenities, there were no public houses.

Instead, the minds of the new residents were to be improved and space was reserved on the corner of Harrow Road and Fourth Avenue for a public library.

This was built by the local council.
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