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MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Shoreditch ·
APRIL
12
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Collingwood Street, E2
Collingwood Street was at the heart of the Old Nicol rookery. In 1680, John Nichol of Gray’s Inn leased just over four acres of gardens for 180 years to a London mason, Jon Richardson, with permission to dig for bricks. The land became built up piecemeal with houses. Many of the local streets were named after Nichol.

At least 22 houses were built in Old Nichol Street in 1801-2, probably on the sites of 17th-century ones.

An area of this was named Friar’s Mount probably after James Fryer who farmed it in the 1720s. Friar’s Mount was sold to Sanderson Turner Sturtevant, a tallow chandler who was leasing out ground on the west side of Turk Street by 1804. A John Gadenne was building on the west side of Mount Street in 1807. Mount Street, from Rose Street to Virginia Row, existed by 1806. Nelson Street and Collingwood Streets ran west from Mount Street by 1807.

A garden - Kemp’s Garden - was taken for building at about the same time. Mead built nine houses in Mead Street in 1806 and others were un...

»more

MARCH
31
2021

 

Howard Street, WC2R
Howard Street ran from Surrey Street to Arundel Street until 1974 Norfolk Street and Howard Street were built over the grounds of Arundel House which had been the property of the Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk.

Howard Street was demolished in the 1970s to build Arundel Great Court.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2021

 

Ayres Street, SE1
Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street Ayres Street changed name in tribute to Alice Ayres - also immortalised in Postman’s Park in the City. Ayres lost her life whilst saving three children from a fire in Union Street in 1885.

John Strype mentions Whitecross Street in his 1720 ’Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster’. He called it "a pretty clean Street, but ordinary Built and Inhabited." It is unknown how long before 1710 that the street was built.

The White Cross Cottages were built in 1890 by social reformer Octavia Hill and designed by Elijah Hoole, as model social housing. They include a hall with interior decoration by Walter Crane.

The dense grain of local small buildings was in part eroded after the Second World War. As redevelopment occurred, larger blocks, occupied by single uses, replaced the Georgian and Victorian houses, shops and warehouses. This is particularly evident in the area between Ayres Street and Southwark Bridge Road.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2021

 

Alpha Grove, E14
Alpha Grove runs from Strafford Street to Tiller Road Alpha Grove ran right through to the West India Dock fence dock - its cranes can be seen at the end of the road. When built in the 1800s, Alpha Road followed a section of the old Island path, Dolphin Lane.

Albert Terrace and Alfred Terrace were rows of houses in Alpha Road.

Alpha Road was renamed Alpha Grove in 1939, and was seriously damaged during WWII.

In 1964 the LCC declared this site as the Manilla Street Clearance Area, and this north end of Alpha Grove became a part of Manilla Street in the Barkantine Estate.

Alpha Road Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Chapel, Alpha Grove Community Centre) was built in 1887. An additional hall was added in 1926. The buildings were converted into a community centre in the 1970s.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2021

 

Aldgate High Street, EC3N
Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London’s history Aldgate High Street was closely located to where the eastern part of the original Roman Wall, and in the medieval period, it led to town of Colchester in Essex.

Because of its connection to places outside London, Aldgate High Street was vital to the geography of medieval London. Unfortunately, any archaeological remnants of the Roman gate have been obscured, and there is no evidence of its precise location, but is believed to have straddled Aldgate High Street, the gate’s northern edge beneath the pavement of current address of 1-2 Aldgate High Street, and its southern edge beneath 88-89 Aldgate High Street.

There is some dispute over the etymology and meaning of "Aldgate," but various historians have provided some theories. The earliest record of Aldgate has it listed as East Gate, which makes sense, given its location as the easternmost gate on the Wall.

Another interpretation of its current name, "Ale Gate," indicates that an ale-ho...
»more





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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JANUARY
28
2016

 

St John’s, Notting Hill
St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill. St John’s was designed by the architects John Hargrave Stevens (1805/6–1857) and George Alexander (1810–1885), and built in the Victorian Gothic style. Dedicated to St John the Evangelist, the church was originally built as the centrepiece of the Ladbroke Estate, a mid nineteenth century housing development designed to attract upper and upper middle class residents to what was then a largely rural neighbourhood in the western suburbs of London.

In 1821 James Weller Ladbroke (died 1847) and his architect Thomas Allason (1790–1852) began to plan an estate on land which now spans the southern end of Ladbroke Grove. From 1837 to 1841 a significant part of this land was used as the Hippodrome race-course. The hill that is now surmounted by St John’s was used by spectators as a natural grandstand to view the races. The Hippodrome was not however a financial success, and by 1843 it had closed, the circular racecourse soon to be replaced by crescents of stuccoed house...
»more


JANUARY
27
2016

 

Sedgemere Avenue, N2
Sedgemere Avenue is named after Sedgemere House which stood on the site. Sedgemere House was situated opposite Park Farm and had dog kennels and a cattery.

It was sold to developers in 1901 and was pulled down to make way for Sedgemere Avenue, a development of ’maisonettes for rent to gentlefolk’.
»read full article


JANUARY
26
2016

 

Kingdon Road, NW6
Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road. Kingdon Road was possibly named after a speculator Emmeline Kingdon, and houses there date between 1883 and 1888.

Three blocks of flats, named Dene Mansions after Little Dene, home of the Ripley family, replaced Lauriston Lodge in 1904 which had been situated on what became the corner of Kingdon Road and Dennington Park Road.
»read full article


JANUARY
23
2016

 

Bangor Street, W11
Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court. Originally called George Street, it was the most notorious road of the Notting Dale ‘Special Area’ slum.

It was more colloquially known as ‘Do as you like Street’, a place where ‘no one left their door closed’, and the venue of the Rag Fair. At the turn of the 20th century, the local district nurses were reported "valiantly holding their own in spite of the disturbance caused by nightly brawls and the noisy and unsavoury Sunday markets."

Valerie Wilson recalled in an interview by the Notting Dale Urban Studies group: “They used to threaten us – don’t go up rag fair and the first thing we did when we got outside, we forgot all about it and went straight through rag fair… that was really like a film show, they used to hang old bits of clothing on the railings… the street would throng with people… there was a group of men who came out the war and they were all ex-servicemen, big tall strong men, and they couldn’t get work, so they f...
»more


JANUARY
21
2016

 

The Eagle
The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road. The pub features a brooding Eagle sat on the top of the corner. There are also a couple of Truman’s Beers lanterns still present and an iron Truman’s sign-holder jutting out from the wall.

There are a number of quirky touches, such as the stately oil paintings denoting the ladies and gents toilets, the elegant black railings that prop up the heavy-set wooden bar, and an Olympic-sized canoe suspended from the ceiling.

It is now the last remaining pub on Ladbroke Grove between the Harrow Road and the Westway.
»read full article


JANUARY
20
2016

 

Weston’s Cider House
In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road. It was closed in 1970 and demolished as part of a road improvement scheme.
»read full article


JANUARY
19
2016

 

The Mitre
The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road. The pub closed c.1972 after it burnt down.

After The Mitre was demolished, it eventually became home to Cafe O’Porto, one of Golborne’s favourite coffee shops.
»read full article


JANUARY
18
2016

 

Woodfield Crescent, W9
Woodfield Crescent was a former street in London W9. Most likely built in the 1880s, the road ceased to exist in the 1960s once the area was redeveloped.
»read full article


JANUARY
17
2016

 

North Kensington Library
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries. It was built as part of the free library movement.
»read full article


JANUARY
16
2016

 

Tavistock Mews, W11
Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road. Tavistock Mews is a short mews off Hayden’s Place, running behind Nos. 237-247 (odds) Portobello Road. Originally, the entrance to it was through an archway between Nos. 239 and 241 Portobello Road and there was no way through from Hayden’s Place. No trace of that entrance remains and Tavistock Mews is now effectively a branch of Hayden’s Place. The eastern side is lined with storage units and the other side gives access to the rears of the Portobello houses.

The mews was built in the 1860s and there is a full set of early deeds for the original Nos. 1-3 Tavistock Mews in the Local Studies section of Kensington Central Library. The buildings are described in the deeds as “coach-houses and tenements” – i.e. the coach-house would have been on the ground floor with accommodation above. In the 1920s, it was the Home of the Tavistock Mews Lads’ Club and Institute.

In 1933 the Mews was clearly in a very dilapidated state and it was declared a cl...
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JANUARY
15
2016

 

Stanley Gardens Mews, W11
Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s. Almost all that remains of the old Stanley Gardens Mews is the entrance through an arch on the left side of St Peter’s church in Kensington Park Road, together with a stretch of the old cobbles under the arch. There is also some attractive ironwork decoration under the arch.

It was a standard mews, both sides lined with small units, stables with accommodation above, running behind the Victorian terrace at Nos. 92-110 Kensington Park Road. There were 15 units in all. They were probably built in 1861 at the same time as the houses in this bit of Kensington Park Road, as the mews appears on the 1863 Ordnance Survey map.

By the end of the Second World War, the Mews was in a pretty dilapidated state. Nos. 11 and 12, the two houses immediately behind the 20th Century Theatre (formerly the Victoria Hall) belonged to the theatre and had been used as dressing rooms and to store stage scenery. But according to planning documents, by 1954 they were dilapidated an...
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JANUARY
12
2016

 

Fourth Avenue, EN1
Plans for four houses in Fourth Avenue were first submitted in 1880. In 1974 Enfield council compulsorily purchased properties north of Main Avenue and demolished Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Avenues to put up a housing estate.

Extensive Roman remains were discovered in the process and the new cul-de-sacs that took their places were given Roman-related names.
»read full article


JANUARY
11
2016

 

Ladbroke Terrace, W11
Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate. Building started in the 1820s at the Holland Park Avenue end, on the eastern side with four villas between the Avenue and what was to become Ladbroke Road. Others followed within ten years.

The normal development pattern seems to have been followed with James Weller Ladbroke first giving building leases, and then once the houses were constructed giving 99-year leases of the buildings at a relatively low ground rent to the developer, who could then sell the leaseholds or sublet the houses to recoup his outlay.
»read full article


JANUARY
10
2016

 

Winchester Hotel
Winchester Hotel was situated at 21a Winchester Road, NW3 It closed about 1970 to become home to the Winchester Project, a local youth centre.
»read full article


JANUARY
7
2016

 

Welbeck Mansions, NW6
Welbeck Mansions, flats notable for their ironwork balconies, were built north of Inglewood Road in 1897. They were built on the site of Potter’s foundry.
»read full article


JANUARY
6
2016

 

West Cottages, NW6
Cottages in London NW6. Industry came to West Hampstead, in the form of Thomas Potter’s foundry on the south-west side of West End Green, arrived in the 1860s, followed by Potter’s Buildings or West Cottages for its workers.
»read full article


JANUARY
5
2016

 

Inglewood Road, NW6
Inglewood Road, NW6 was one of the last roads to be built in West End, West Hampstead. On the west side of West End Lane, the land between the three railway lines was still largely untouched but beyond them building spread during the 1880s.

Thomas Potter, owner of Thorplands, 13 acres south of Mill Lane, stretching westward from the junction with West End Lane, where he lived in Poplar House, built about 15 houses fronting Mill Lane between 1873 and 1877 and the Elms and the Cedars next to the green by 1878.

New roads were constructed in the late 1870s and 346 houses were built between 1882 and 1894 in Sumatra, Solent, Holmdale, Glenbrook, Pandora, and Narcissus roads, mostly by J. I. Chapman of Solent Road, G. W. Cossens of Mill Lane, Jabez Reynolds of Holmdale Road, and James Gibb of Dennington Park Road.

Another 28 houses and a Methodist church were built on the estate fronting Mill Lane in 1886-7 and seven blocks of flats in West End Lane on what was called the Cedars estate in 1894.

Some 49 houses were ...
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JANUARY
4
2016

 

Inglewood House, NW6
Inglewood House is on the corner of West End Lane and Inglewood Road. Inglewood Road was built on the site of Poplar House in 1893.
»read full article


JANUARY
3
2016

 

Marlborough Mansions, NW6
Marlborough Mansions is a residential block in Fortune Green, NW6 E. J. Cave, one of the district’s most prominent Victorian builders, built the Cannon Hill estate where Marlborough, Buckingham and Avenue Mansions were built in the triangle formed by Cannon Hill, Finchley Road, and West End Lane in 1896-1900.

Conductor Sir Adrian Boult lived at at 78 Marlborough Mansions on Cannon Hill and has a blue plaque to his memory there. Nigel Balchin, the novelist, died in 1970 also in Marlborough Mansions.
»read full article


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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.