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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Brondesbury Park ·
October
29
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
The Elms
The Elms - also known as Elm Lodge - stood at the junction of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane. From around the 1750, The Elms was under the ownership of a number of people. Mr and Mrs Pickersgill were in occupation between 1829 and 1832. The husband, Henry William Pickersgill, was an eminent portrait painter. Mrs Pickersgill ran a school for ‘female education’.

From 1832 John Ebers, a widowed theatre manager with two daughters moved into The Elms. He moved into the world of publishing.

Next, the writer William Harrison Ainsworth lived in the house (his wife was Fanny Ebers, daughter of John). Here he began writing his novel ’Rookwood’, about the notorious highwayman Dick Turpin. John Ebers published the book. Although the inn where Dick Turpin met his accomplices is based on The Cock in Kilburn, the story is fictitious and there’s no historical evidence to link Turpin to Kilburn.

The Elms stood on the site of the later Gaumont State Cinema.

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OCTOBER
10
2020

 

Amberley Mews, W9
Amberley Mews starred as Tom Riley’s home in the 1950 movie "The Blue Lamp" The site of Westbourne Manor House was built over from around 1867 with Amberley Road and its timber wharves built along the canal bank. Amberley Mews was built behind Amberley Road as a typical 1860 mews development.

Amberley Mews was featured, providing a record of its look, in the film ’The Blue Lamp’ at the beginning of the 1950s. Dirk Bogarde played Tom Riley, living in the fictional version of the street. Amberley Mews no longer exists - the site was built over with new flats at the end of the 1960s.
»read full article


OCTOBER
9
2020

 

Oakington Manor Farm
Oakington Manor Farm derived its name from a corruption of the name ’Tokyngton’ Oakington (Manor) Farm was an old Wembley manor and farm, first mentioned in 1171.

Gordon S Maxwell’s The Fringe of London (published 1925) talks of the small Middlesex hamlet of Monks Park, alongside the river Brent to the south of Oakington Farm.

In 1845, Richard Welford, a cowkeeper from Holloway, took over Warwick Farm, Paddington and founded what was to become J Welford & Sons Ltd. His dairy business became the largest retail milk business in the capital. The farm’s cowsheds were situated between the Harrow Road and what is now Warwick Crescent. The fields of Warwick Farm were built over and became Warwick Avenue, Warwick Place and Warwick Crescent.

In the mid 1850s, the Warwick Farm cowsheds were moved to Oakington Manor Farm in Wembley.

The farm was situated almost next to Watkin’s Folly in Wembley Park. What was later South Way was the farm’s access track but in 1906, the Great Central Railway bu...
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OCTOBER
8
2020

 

British Museum station
British Museum was a station on the Central line, located in Holborn and taking its name from the nearby British Museum in Great Russell Street British Museum station was opened by the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900 with an entrance at 133 High Holborn.

There had been ideas for an underground passageway between British Museum and Holborn (100 metres away and open in 1906) but tunnelling would have been complex. A proposal to enlarge the tunnels under High Holborn to create new platforms at Holborn station for the Central and to abandon the British Museum station was originally included in a private bill submitted to parliament as early as November 1913. The First World War prevented any work taking place. The works were eventually carried out as part of the modernisation of Holborn station at the beginning of the 1930s when escalators were installed. British Museum station was closed on 24 September 1933, with the new platforms at Holborn opening the following day.

British Museum station was subsequently used up to the 1960s as a military administrative office and emergency command post, ...
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OCTOBER
7
2020

 

Nether Street, N3
Nether Street was recognised by the mid-14th century as an old street, sometimes called ’Lower Street’ Nether Street was a link road from the main roads to Finchley properties such as Moss Hall and Brent Lodge. It was already called Nether Street by 1365 and ’le lower street’ in 1622. It was linked at both ends to Ballards Lane. Coles Lane, first mentioned in 1393 may have been the southern link. About 1867 the northern section was named Mosshall Lane.

By the time of the 1851 census, Nether Street had 17 houses, including Elm Place, Sellars Hall, Brent Lodge, Long Lodge, and Courthouse Farm, and housed two fund-holders, two members of the stock exchange and two solicitors.

West of Nether street is Dollis Brook, a tributary of the Brent. The viaduct carrying trains between Mill Hill East and Finchley Central was designed by Sir John Fowler and is the highest point above sea level on the London Underground.

The large house which is now Finchley Golf Club (here since 1929) was originally called Nether Court. This is one of the larg...
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JANUARY
30
2016

 

Holly Walk, NW3
Holly Walk connects Holly Hill with Church Row. In 1811, Hampstead vestry bought a 2½ acre field on the east side of Holly Walk for a churchyard, which it made from only the southern portion.

Most of the cottages which line Holly Walk date from 1813.

St Mary’s Catholic Church was built in 1796 by and for refugees who fled their homeland during the French Revolution.

Beyond the church a plaque on the wall of number 9 Holly Place, named The Watch House, advises that "in the 1830s the newly formed Hampstead Police Force set out on its patrol and nightly watch from this house."
»read full article


JANUARY
29
2016

 

St John’s Hill
St John’s Hill is the highest point in the area. St John’s Hill is the summit of the high ground of Notting Hill.

When the Kensington Hippodrome was in operation before 1841, the grassy mound here formed "a sort of natural grand-stand," railed in as a hill for pedestrians.

The summit of the hill is described by Florence Gladstone as being a point along "Upper Lansdown Terrace" rather than the church.
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JANUARY
28
2016

 

St John’s, Notting Hill
St John’s Notting Hill is a Victorian Anglican church built in 1845 in Lansdowne Crescent, Notting Hill. St John’s was designed by the architects John Hargrave Stevens (1805/6–1857) and George Alexander (1810–1885), and built in the Victorian Gothic style. Dedicated to St John the Evangelist, the church was originally built as the centrepiece of the Ladbroke Estate, a mid nineteenth century housing development designed to attract upper and upper middle class residents to what was then a largely rural neighbourhood in the western suburbs of London.

In 1821 James Weller Ladbroke (died 1847) and his architect Thomas Allason (1790–1852) began to plan an estate on land which now spans the southern end of Ladbroke Grove. From 1837 to 1841 a significant part of this land was used as the Hippodrome race-course. The hill that is now surmounted by St John’s was used by spectators as a natural grandstand to view the races. The Hippodrome was not however a financial success, and by 1843 it had closed, the circular racecourse soon to be replaced by crescents of stuccoed house...
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JANUARY
27
2016

 

Sedgemere Avenue, N2
Sedgemere Avenue is named after Sedgemere House which stood on the site. Sedgemere House was situated opposite Park Farm and had dog kennels and a cattery.

It was sold to developers in 1901 and was pulled down to make way for Sedgemere Avenue, a development of ’maisonettes for rent to gentlefolk’.
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JANUARY
26
2016

 

Kingdon Road, NW6
Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road. Kingdon Road was possibly named after a speculator Emmeline Kingdon, and houses there date between 1883 and 1888.

Three blocks of flats, named Dene Mansions after Little Dene, home of the Ripley family, replaced Lauriston Lodge in 1904 which had been situated on what became the corner of Kingdon Road and Dennington Park Road.
»read full article


JANUARY
23
2016

 

Bangor Street, W11
Bangor Street, W11 was situated on the site of the modern Henry Dickens Court. Originally called George Street, it was the most notorious road of the Notting Dale ‘Special Area’ slum.

It was more colloquially known as ‘Do as you like Street’, a place where ‘no one left their door closed’, and the venue of the Rag Fair. At the turn of the 20th century, the local district nurses were reported "valiantly holding their own in spite of the disturbance caused by nightly brawls and the noisy and unsavoury Sunday markets."

Valerie Wilson recalled in an interview by the Notting Dale Urban Studies group: “They used to threaten us – don’t go up rag fair and the first thing we did when we got outside, we forgot all about it and went straight through rag fair… that was really like a film show, they used to hang old bits of clothing on the railings… the street would throng with people… there was a group of men who came out the war and they were all ex-servicemen, big tall strong men, and they couldn’t get work, so they f...
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JANUARY
21
2016

 

The Eagle
The Eagle, on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Telford Road. The pub features a brooding Eagle sat on the top of the corner. There are also a couple of Truman’s Beers lanterns still present and an iron Truman’s sign-holder jutting out from the wall.

There are a number of quirky touches, such as the stately oil paintings denoting the ladies and gents toilets, the elegant black railings that prop up the heavy-set wooden bar, and an Olympic-sized canoe suspended from the ceiling.

It is now the last remaining pub on Ladbroke Grove between the Harrow Road and the Westway.
»read full article


JANUARY
20
2016

 

Weston’s Cider House
In 1930 Weston’s opened their first and only cider mill on the Harrow Road. It was closed in 1970 and demolished as part of a road improvement scheme.
»read full article


JANUARY
19
2016

 

The Mitre
The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road. The pub closed c.1972 after it burnt down.

After The Mitre was demolished, it eventually became home to Cafe O’Porto, one of Golborne’s favourite coffee shops.
»read full article


JANUARY
18
2016

 

Woodfield Crescent, W9
Woodfield Crescent was a former street in London W9. Most likely built in the 1880s, the road ceased to exist in the 1960s once the area was redeveloped.
»read full article


JANUARY
17
2016

 

North Kensington Library
North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries. It was built as part of the free library movement.
»read full article


JANUARY
16
2016

 

Tavistock Mews, W11
Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road. Tavistock Mews is a short mews off Hayden’s Place, running behind Nos. 237-247 (odds) Portobello Road. Originally, the entrance to it was through an archway between Nos. 239 and 241 Portobello Road and there was no way through from Hayden’s Place. No trace of that entrance remains and Tavistock Mews is now effectively a branch of Hayden’s Place. The eastern side is lined with storage units and the other side gives access to the rears of the Portobello houses.

The mews was built in the 1860s and there is a full set of early deeds for the original Nos. 1-3 Tavistock Mews in the Local Studies section of Kensington Central Library. The buildings are described in the deeds as “coach-houses and tenements” – i.e. the coach-house would have been on the ground floor with accommodation above. In the 1920s, it was the Home of the Tavistock Mews Lads’ Club and Institute.

In 1933 the Mews was clearly in a very dilapidated state and it was declared a cl...
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JANUARY
15
2016

 

Stanley Gardens Mews, W11
Stanley Gardens Mews existed between 1861 and the mid 1970s. Almost all that remains of the old Stanley Gardens Mews is the entrance through an arch on the left side of St Peter’s church in Kensington Park Road, together with a stretch of the old cobbles under the arch. There is also some attractive ironwork decoration under the arch.

It was a standard mews, both sides lined with small units, stables with accommodation above, running behind the Victorian terrace at Nos. 92-110 Kensington Park Road. There were 15 units in all. They were probably built in 1861 at the same time as the houses in this bit of Kensington Park Road, as the mews appears on the 1863 Ordnance Survey map.

By the end of the Second World War, the Mews was in a pretty dilapidated state. Nos. 11 and 12, the two houses immediately behind the 20th Century Theatre (formerly the Victoria Hall) belonged to the theatre and had been used as dressing rooms and to store stage scenery. But according to planning documents, by 1954 they were dilapidated an...
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JANUARY
12
2016

 

Fourth Avenue, EN1
Plans for four houses in Fourth Avenue were first submitted in 1880. In 1974 Enfield council compulsorily purchased properties north of Main Avenue and demolished Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Avenues to put up a housing estate.

Extensive Roman remains were discovered in the process and the new cul-de-sacs that took their places were given Roman-related names.
»read full article


JANUARY
11
2016

 

Ladbroke Terrace, W11
Ladbroke Terrace was one of the first streets to be created on the Ladbroke estate. Building started in the 1820s at the Holland Park Avenue end, on the eastern side with four villas between the Avenue and what was to become Ladbroke Road. Others followed within ten years.

The normal development pattern seems to have been followed with James Weller Ladbroke first giving building leases, and then once the houses were constructed giving 99-year leases of the buildings at a relatively low ground rent to the developer, who could then sell the leaseholds or sublet the houses to recoup his outlay.
»read full article


JANUARY
10
2016

 

Winchester Hotel
Winchester Hotel was situated at 21a Winchester Road, NW3 It closed about 1970 to become home to the Winchester Project, a local youth centre.
»read full article


JANUARY
7
2016

 

Welbeck Mansions, NW6
Welbeck Mansions, flats notable for their ironwork balconies, were built north of Inglewood Road in 1897. They were built on the site of Potter’s foundry.
»read full article


JANUARY
6
2016

 

West Cottages, NW6
Cottages in London NW6. Industry came to West Hampstead, in the form of Thomas Potter’s foundry on the south-west side of West End Green, arrived in the 1860s, followed by Potter’s Buildings or West Cottages for its workers.
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JANUARY
5
2016

 

Inglewood Road, NW6
Inglewood Road, NW6 was one of the last roads to be built in West End, West Hampstead. On the west side of West End Lane, the land between the three railway lines was still largely untouched but beyond them building spread during the 1880s.

Thomas Potter, owner of Thorplands, 13 acres south of Mill Lane, stretching westward from the junction with West End Lane, where he lived in Poplar House, built about 15 houses fronting Mill Lane between 1873 and 1877 and the Elms and the Cedars next to the green by 1878.

New roads were constructed in the late 1870s and 346 houses were built between 1882 and 1894 in Sumatra, Solent, Holmdale, Glenbrook, Pandora, and Narcissus roads, mostly by J. I. Chapman of Solent Road, G. W. Cossens of Mill Lane, Jabez Reynolds of Holmdale Road, and James Gibb of Dennington Park Road.

Another 28 houses and a Methodist church were built on the estate fronting Mill Lane in 1886-7 and seven blocks of flats in West End Lane on what was called the Cedars estate in 1894.

Some 49 houses were ...
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JANUARY
4
2016

 

Inglewood House, NW6
Inglewood House is on the corner of West End Lane and Inglewood Road. Inglewood Road was built on the site of Poplar House in 1893.
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JANUARY
3
2016

 

Marlborough Mansions, NW6
Marlborough Mansions is a residential block in Fortune Green, NW6 E. J. Cave, one of the district’s most prominent Victorian builders, built the Cannon Hill estate where Marlborough, Buckingham and Avenue Mansions were built in the triangle formed by Cannon Hill, Finchley Road, and West End Lane in 1896-1900.

Conductor Sir Adrian Boult lived at at 78 Marlborough Mansions on Cannon Hill and has a blue plaque to his memory there. Nigel Balchin, the novelist, died in 1970 also in Marlborough Mansions.
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.