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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Brondesbury Park ·
October
29
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
The Elms
The Elms - also known as Elm Lodge - stood at the junction of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane. From around the 1750, The Elms was under the ownership of a number of people. Mr and Mrs Pickersgill were in occupation between 1829 and 1832. The husband, Henry William Pickersgill, was an eminent portrait painter. Mrs Pickersgill ran a school for ‘female education’.

From 1832 John Ebers, a widowed theatre manager with two daughters moved into The Elms. He moved into the world of publishing.

Next, the writer William Harrison Ainsworth lived in the house (his wife was Fanny Ebers, daughter of John). Here he began writing his novel ’Rookwood’, about the notorious highwayman Dick Turpin. John Ebers published the book. Although the inn where Dick Turpin met his accomplices is based on The Cock in Kilburn, the story is fictitious and there’s no historical evidence to link Turpin to Kilburn.

The Elms stood on the site of the later Gaumont State Cinema.

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OCTOBER
10
2020

 

Amberley Mews, W9
Amberley Mews starred as Tom Riley’s home in the 1950 movie "The Blue Lamp" The site of Westbourne Manor House was built over from around 1867 with Amberley Road and its timber wharves built along the canal bank. Amberley Mews was built behind Amberley Road as a typical 1860 mews development.

Amberley Mews was featured, providing a record of its look, in the film ’The Blue Lamp’ at the beginning of the 1950s. Dirk Bogarde played Tom Riley, living in the fictional version of the street. Amberley Mews no longer exists - the site was built over with new flats at the end of the 1960s.
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OCTOBER
9
2020

 

Oakington Manor Farm
Oakington Manor Farm derived its name from a corruption of the name ’Tokyngton’ Oakington (Manor) Farm was an old Wembley manor and farm, first mentioned in 1171.

Gordon S Maxwell’s The Fringe of London (published 1925) talks of the small Middlesex hamlet of Monks Park, alongside the river Brent to the south of Oakington Farm.

In 1845, Richard Welford, a cowkeeper from Holloway, took over Warwick Farm, Paddington and founded what was to become J Welford & Sons Ltd. His dairy business became the largest retail milk business in the capital. The farm’s cowsheds were situated between the Harrow Road and what is now Warwick Crescent. The fields of Warwick Farm were built over and became Warwick Avenue, Warwick Place and Warwick Crescent.

In the mid 1850s, the Warwick Farm cowsheds were moved to Oakington Manor Farm in Wembley.

The farm was situated almost next to Watkin’s Folly in Wembley Park. What was later South Way was the farm’s access track but in 1906, the Great Central Railway bu...
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OCTOBER
8
2020

 

British Museum station
British Museum was a station on the Central line, located in Holborn and taking its name from the nearby British Museum in Great Russell Street British Museum station was opened by the Central London Railway on 30 July 1900 with an entrance at 133 High Holborn.

There had been ideas for an underground passageway between British Museum and Holborn (100 metres away and open in 1906) but tunnelling would have been complex. A proposal to enlarge the tunnels under High Holborn to create new platforms at Holborn station for the Central and to abandon the British Museum station was originally included in a private bill submitted to parliament as early as November 1913. The First World War prevented any work taking place. The works were eventually carried out as part of the modernisation of Holborn station at the beginning of the 1930s when escalators were installed. British Museum station was closed on 24 September 1933, with the new platforms at Holborn opening the following day.

British Museum station was subsequently used up to the 1960s as a military administrative office and emergency command post, ...
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OCTOBER
7
2020

 

Nether Street, N3
Nether Street was recognised by the mid-14th century as an old street, sometimes called ’Lower Street’ Nether Street was a link road from the main roads to Finchley properties such as Moss Hall and Brent Lodge. It was already called Nether Street by 1365 and ’le lower street’ in 1622. It was linked at both ends to Ballards Lane. Coles Lane, first mentioned in 1393 may have been the southern link. About 1867 the northern section was named Mosshall Lane.

By the time of the 1851 census, Nether Street had 17 houses, including Elm Place, Sellars Hall, Brent Lodge, Long Lodge, and Courthouse Farm, and housed two fund-holders, two members of the stock exchange and two solicitors.

West of Nether street is Dollis Brook, a tributary of the Brent. The viaduct carrying trains between Mill Hill East and Finchley Central was designed by Sir John Fowler and is the highest point above sea level on the London Underground.

The large house which is now Finchley Golf Club (here since 1929) was originally called Nether Court. This is one of the larg...
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MARCH
31
2016

 

22 Maxilla Gardens
22 Maxilla Gardens is a now-demolished property.
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MARCH
31
2016

 

24 Maxilla Gardens
24 Maxilla Gardens was an address along Maxilla Gardens.
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MARCH
26
2016

 

Dollis Hill House
Dollis Hill House was an early 19th-century farmhouse located on the modern-day northern boundary of Gladstone Park. It was built as a farmhouse in 1825 by the Finch family and later occupied by Sir Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, who subsequently became Lord Tweedmouth. In 1881 Lord Tweedmouth’s daughter and her husband, Lord Aberdeen, took up residence. They often had Prime Minister William Ewart Gladstone to stay as a guest. Other guests at the house included Joseph Chamberlain, Lord Rosebery, and Lord Randolph Churchill, father of Winston Churchill.

In 1897 Lord Aberdeen was appointed Governor-General of Canada and the Aberdeens moved out. When Willesden Urban District Council acquired the house and land in 1899, they named the park Gladstone Park after the old Prime Minister who had died the previous year.

Newspaper proprietor Hugh Gilzean-Reid occupied the house after the Aberdeens moved out, and his guests included the American author Mark Twain, who stayed at Dollis Hill house in the summer of 1900. Twain wrote that he had "never seen any place that was so satisfa...
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MARCH
25
2016

 

Hendon Central (1923)
Photographed in 1923, this stretch of Butchers Lane would soon become Hendon Central Circus and have Watford Way built along the route of the old lane. Taken at the junction of Queens Road, this photograph is taken on more or less the same spot as a 1928 photo (though viewing east rather than north).
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MARCH
24
2016

 

Hendon Central (1928)
Photographed in 1928, this stretch of Watford Way at Hendon Central Circus had recently been built along ancient Butchers Lane and shops were rapidly lining its sides. The United Dairies occupied the domed building, a prestigeous site. Further up Hendon Way you can see an island site between the two carriageways with a pond and war memorial. The houses here were demolished in the 1940s.

Taken at the junction of Queens Road, this photograph is taken on more or less the same spot as a 1923 photo.
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MARCH
17
2016

 

City Racing
City Racing was an artist-run space in Kennington, South London which was active between 1988 and 1998. It was a cooperative by five artists Matt Hale, Paul Noble, John Burgess, Keith Coventry and Peter Owen. They set up the gallery in a former betting shop near The Oval Cricket Ground, hence the derivation of the gallery name. City Racing became an important and renowned exhibition space; its openings provided a networking opportunity for many artists.

In its later years, City Racing was accepted to some extent by the art establishment, and was viewed by some as a route for artists to other more commercial and established galleries.

Read the City Racing entry on the Wikipedia...
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MARCH
16
2016

 

The Royal School, Hampstead
The Royal School, Hampstead, was an independent girls’ day and boarding school. The school educated girls aged 3-16. The Royal School was founded in 1855 as the Soldiers’ Infant Home before becoming the Royal Soldiers’ Daughters’ School on this site in 1867. It was established "to nurse, board, clothe and educate the female children, orphans or not, of soldiers in Her Majesty’s Army killed in the Crimean War".

Old Vane House previously stood on the site - the residence of Sir Harry Vane of the Commonwealth, and later of Bishop Butler. The Home stood on the site of the south wing of this building, and included no part of it.

As the Daughter’s School, as described in 1902: "At the back a large extent of grass playground stretched out westward, and at the end of this there was a grove of trees. On one side of the grass is a large playroom built in 1880 by means of an opportune legacy, and on the other a covered cloister which led to the school, standing detached from the house at the other end of the playground. An old pier burdened with a mass of ivy stood up ...
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MARCH
15
2016

 

Kemplay Road, NW3
Kemplay Road is a street in Hampstead. In 1873 the contractor John Culverhouse was allowed to enclose waste on the south side of Willow Road, from Willow Cottages to Downshire Hill. The strip was enfranchised and conveyed in 1875 to the British Land Co., which also acquired the Carlile estate, enfranchised in 1873, between Gayton Road and Crescent, Willow Road, and Downshire Hill.

All the roads (Denning, Willoughby, Kemplay, and Carlingford roads and Rudall Crescent) had been laid out on the estate by 1878, and houses there and on the Willow Road frontage were complete by 1886.
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MARCH
13
2016

 

Willoughby Road, NW3
Willoughby Road is a street in Hampstead. In 1873 the contractor John Culverhouse was allowed to enclose waste on the south side of Willow Road, from Willow Cottages to Downshire Hill. The strip was enfranchised and conveyed in 1875 to the British Land Co., which also acquired the Carlile estate, enfranchised in 1873, between Gayton Road and Crescent, Willow Road, and Downshire Hill.

Carlile House made way for Willoughby Road in 1876.
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MARCH
13
2016

 

St John’s Gate, Clerkenwell
St John’s Gate is one of the few tangible remains from Clerkenwell’s monastic past; it was built in 1504 by Prior Thomas Docwra as the south entrance to the inner precinct of Clerkenwell Priory, the priory of the Knights of Saint John - the Knights Hospitallers. The substructure is of brick, the north and south façades of stone. After centuries of decay and much rebuilding, very little of the stone facing is original; heavily restored in the 19th century, the Gate today is in large part a Victorian recreation, the handiwork of a succession of architects — William P. Griffiths, R. Norman Shaw, and J. Oldrid Scott.


The building has many historical associations, most notably as the original printing-house for Edward Cave’s pioneering monthly, The Gentleman’s Magazine, and sometime workplace of Samuel Johnson. From 1701-1709 it was the childhood home of the painter William Hogarth. In 1703 his father Richard opened a coffee house there, ’Hogarth’s Coffee House’, offering Latin lessons together with the coffee.


For many years the building was used as a tavern. The Gate was acquired in the 1870s by the revived Order of St John and was gradually converted to serve as headquarters of both th...
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MARCH
12
2016

 

Rudall Crescent, NW3
Rudall Crescent was laid out by a builder John Culverhouse in 1878. In 1873 the contractor John Culverhouse was allowed to enclose waste on the south side of Willow Road. Rudall Crescent was laid out on the estate in 1878.
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MARCH
11
2016

 

Carlingford Road, NW3
Carlingford Road runs between Pilgrim’s Lane and Willoughby Road. In 1873 the contractor John Culverhouse was allowed to enclose waste on the south side of Willow Road, from Willow Cottages to Downshire Hill. The strip was enfranchised and conveyed in 1875 to the British Land Co., which also acquired the Carlile estate, enfranchised in 1873, between Gayton Road and Crescent, Willow Road, and Downshire Hill.

All the roads (Denning, Willoughby, Kemplay, and Carlingford roads and Rudall Crescent) had been laid out on the estate by 1878, and houses there and on the Willow Road frontage were complete by 1886.
»read full article


MARCH
10
2016

 

Hampstead Hill Gardens, NW3
Hampstead Hill Gardens is a street in Hampstead. North of Pond Street was a small estate owned by George Crispin, who built Hampstead Hill Gardens in 1873. Most of the houses, nos. 3-21 (odd) and 2-6 (even), were designed for ’gentleman artists’ by Batterbury & Huxley from 1876 as ’rosered villas’ with rubbed-brick ornaments.
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MARCH
2
2016

 

Chester Terrace, NW1
Chester Terrace is the longest unbroken facade of the neo-classical terraces in Regent's Park. Chester Terrace takes its name from one of the titles of George IV before he became king, Earl of Chester.

As with Cornwall Terrace and York Terrace, the architectural plans were made by John Nash but subsequently altered almost beyond recognition by Decimus Burton, who was responsible for the existing design, which was built by his father James Burton in 1825. Nash was so dissatisfied with Decimus's design that he sought the demolition and complete rebuilding of the Terrace, but in vain.

All 42 houses are Grade I listed buildings. At each end there is a Corinthian arch bearing at the top the terrace name in large lettering on a blue background, probably the largest street signs in London. Five houses are semi-detached. One of these, Nash House (3 Chester Terrace, although the main entrance is on Chester Gate), has a bust of John Nash on its west side.
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MARCH
1
2016

 

Queensdale Road, W11
Queensdale Road is a long road stretching from west to east, containing terraces of Victorian houses. Most of the houses consist of 3 storeys and a basement. The houses are painted in different pastel colours. There is a cheerful and bright atmosphere to the street.
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.