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Featured · Greenwich ·
MAY
10
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Greenwich
Greenwich is a town, now part of the south eastern urban sprawl of London, on the south bank of the River Thames. Greenwich is notable for its maritime history and for giving its name to the Greenwich Meridian (0° longitude) and Greenwich Mean Time. The town became the site of a royal palace, the Palace of Placentia from the 15th century, and was the birthplace of many Tudors, including Henry VIII and Elizabeth I. The palace fell into disrepair during the English Civil War and was demolished to be replaced by the Royal Naval Hospital for Sailors, designed by Sir Christopher Wren and his assistant Nicholas Hawksmoor. These buildings became the Royal Naval College in 1873, and they remained a military education establishment until 1998 when they passed into the hands of the Greenwich Foundation. The historic rooms within these buildings remain open to the public; other buildings are used by University of Greenwich and Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The town became a popular resort in the 18th century and many grand houses were built there, such as Vanbrugh Castle es...

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APRIL
17
2021

 

West Smithfield, EC1A
West Smithfield is the oldest street of the Smithfield area Smithfield and its market was founded in 1137. The ancient parish of St Sepulchre extended north to Turnmill Street, to St Paul’s Cathedral and Ludgate Hill in the south, and along the east bank of the Fleet (now the route of Farringdon Street). St Sepulchre’s Tower contains the twelve ’bells of Old Bailey’, referred to in the nursery rhyme "Oranges and Lemons". Traditionally, the Great Bell was rung to announce the execution of a prisoner at Newgate.

A livestock market was in the area as early as the 10th century.

As a large open space close to the City, Smithfield was a popular place for public gatherings. In 1374 Edward III held a seven-day tournament at Smithfield. Possibly the most famous medieval tournament at Smithfield was that commanded in 1390 by Richard II.

The Priory of St Bartholomew had long treated the sick. After the Reformation it was left with neither income nor monastic occupants but, following a petition by the C...
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APRIL
16
2021

 

Old Ford Road, E3
Old Ford Road stretches two and a quarter miles from Bethnal Green to Bow Old Ford Road represents two separate ways from different points to the sometime passage across the Lee, one being from the west, the other from the south, which in meeting converged with a third from the north which is known now as Wick Lane, the communication with Hackney.

In ancient times the estuary of the river Lee extended as far as Hackney Wick, and during the period when the Romans were in Britain the marshes which lay above it and on either side were crossed in the direction of Leyton by a stone causeway of which portions have been found, but of any contemporary road leading to it no traces have been discovered, although Roman remains were unearthed in 1868 in the coal and goods yard attached to Old Ford Station. The probability is that there was no military highway of massive construction such as those found elsewhere, but a track formed by use which led through woods and over the open fields to the first fordable place on the river Lee or Lea, a name derived ...
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APRIL
15
2021

 

Crossharbour
Crossharbour is a station on the Docklands Light Railway (DLR) Bank-Lewisham Line in Cubitt Town The station opened as ’Crossharbour’ on 31 August 1987 but was renamed in 1994 to ’Crossharbour and London Arena’. After the neighbouring London Arena was demolished in 2006, the original name was reinstated. Just to the north of the current station, the London and Blackwall Railway built Millwall Docks station. This operated between 1871 and 1926.

The ’cross harbour’ name refers to the nearby Glengall Bridge across Millwall Inner Dock. The bridge’s construction was a neccessity for the developers to obtain planning approval for the dock when it was built in 1868.

In 1969 Tower Hamlets council completed the St John’s estate on the Cubitt Town side of the station. The project was begun 17 years earlier by Poplar Borough Council.
»read full article


APRIL
14
2021

 

Narrow Street, E14
Narrow Street is a road running parallel to the River Thames through the Limehouse area Many archaeologists believe that Narrow Street represents the line of the medieval river wall. This wall was built to reclaim riverside marshland and to protect it from the tides.

A combination of tides and currents made this point on the Thames a natural landfall for ships. The first wharf was complete in 1348. Lime kilns or oasts (’lymehostes’) used in the production of mortar and pottery were built here in the fourteenth century.

Houses were then built, on the wall itself at first, but then outwards onto the foreshore by a process of encroachment. Indeed, the eastern end of Narrow Street was previously known as Fore Street.

The area grew rapidly in Elizabethan times as a centre for world trade. The neighbourhood supplied ships with ropes and other necessities; pottery was also made here for the ships. Ship chandlers settled here building wooden houses and wharves in the cramped space between street and river.

By the t...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
Carol   
Added: 7 May 2021 18:44 GMT   

Nan
My nan lily,her sister Elizabeth and their parents Elizabeth and William lived here in1911

Reply

   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

Reply
Comment
David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

Reply

Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

Reply
JUNE
26
2016

 

Woodhouse College
Woodhouse College is a further education establishment which accepts students between the ages of 16 and 19. After the First World War, the former residence of ornamental plasterer Thomas Collins (1735–1830) in the Woodhouse area of Finchley was reconstructed; the house became The Woodhouse School in 1923. A blue plaque commemorating Thomas Collins is on the wall outside the present college office. The school coat of arms with the motto ’Cheerfulness with Industry’ is still displayed above the stage in the college hall.

During the Second World War, the school continued to function while the basement was used by the ARP service. The names of the forty-seven former pupils who died during WWII are recorded in a hand-illuminated Roll of Honour which hangs at the foot of the main staircase near the front entrance to the college.

The Roll of Honour also records the names of the four houses of the old grammar school: Gordon, Livingstone, Nightingale and Scott.
»read full article


JUNE
20
2016

 

25 Park Lane
25 Park Lane was the London residence of Sir Philip Sassoon. Sassoon’s Park Lane home was previously owned by his parents Edward Sassoon and Aline Caroline de Rothschild. It was by all accounts a great town house and a great venue for entertaining.

Built in 1895-6 by T. H.Smith and C. E. Sayer for Barney Barnato a South African the house was 13,000 square feet. Peter Stansky author describes the house as having had a four-story-high marble staircase, a conservatory, a winter garden and a ballroom.

Previously decorated by his mother Lady Sassoon after the First World War he undertook extensive changes filling the house with French Furniture, tapestries and his most important paintings. The ballroom was painted by Jose Maria Sert who also painted a room at Port Lympne Mansion.

In 1920 Peter Stanksky notes that Sassoon commissioned him to do the room, despite the distress the Port Lympne Mansion rooms had bought on. The work was entitled Caravans of the East which covered the walls with Greek temple...
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JUNE
19
2016

 

St Mary Matfelon
St Mary Matfelon church was popularly known as St Mary’s, Whitechapel. For more than 600 years a Christian church stood on the site of Adler Street, White Church Lane and Whitechapel High Street. St Mary Matfelon was the second-oldest church in Stepney, having been created as a chapel-of-ease for the local area in the 13th century. A new church was built on the site, largely paid for by Octavius Coope, in 1877.

On 26 August 1880, the new church was devastated by fire, leaving only its tower, vestry and church rooms intact. It was rebuilt, opening in 1882.

On 29 December 1940, a Nazi fire raid destroyed the church. It was left in disrepair until it was finally demolished in 1952. The site of the church became St Mary’s Gardens in 1966 and is now a public park called Altab Ali Park. An outline of the footprint of the church is all that remains of it.

The outside of the original church in the middle ages was whitewashed. Its bright white colour prompted locals to call it the ’white chapel’ which became the name of the area.
»read full article


JUNE
16
2016

 

Camden Road
Camden Road is one of the few railway stations in England in which there is a police station. The first Camden Road (North London Railway) station was opened in 1850 and was situated on the east side of what is now St. Pancras Way. It was renamed Camden Town (NLR) on 1 July 1870 but was closed on 5 December 1870 when it was replaced by the second station situated a short distance to the west.

The present Camden Road station is the second station of this name (the first, on the North London Railway lasted from 1850-1870) and is located at the corner of Royal College Street and Camden Road. Designed by Edwin Henry Horne and opened as "Camden Town" by the North London Railway on 5 December 1870, it was renamed "Camden Road" on 25 September 1950 to avoid confusion with the London Underground Northern line Camden Town which had opened in 1907. Thus, between 1907 and 1950, there were two stations called ’Camden Town’.

In addition to the frequent local passenger service, the station is a busy location for freight traffic due to its proximity to the j...
»more


JUNE
13
2016

 

Ark Burlington Danes Academy
Burlington Danes Academy is a Church of England non-selective, co-educational secondary school within the English academy programme, located on a 10-acre site. The school re-opened as an academy in September 2006, but traces its origins to two separate schools, Burlington School for girls founded in 1699 and St Clement Danes School, founded in 1862, both originally situated in Westminster.

St Clement Danes moved to Du Cane Road in 1928, while Burlington school for Girls took over a magnificent Art Deco building in 1937. Almost 40 years later, in 1976, the two schools merged to create Burlington Danes Church of England School.

The school accepts students between the ages of 3 and 18 and the total school capacity is 1620.
»read full article


JUNE
2
2016

 

St Martin Pomary
St Martin Pomeroy was a parish church in the Cheap ward of the City of London. The church stood on the east side of Ironmonger Lane in the Cheap ward of the City of London. John Stow suggested that the name "Pomary" indicated that apple trees had once grown near the church. The patronage of the church belonged to the prior and canons of St Bartholomew the Great, until the dissolution of the priory, when it passed to the Crown.

In 1627 much of the north wall had to be rebuilt, and two years later the whole church was "repaired and beautified" at the cost of the parishioners. The church was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666 and not rebuilt. Instead the parish was united with that of St Olave Jewry and the site of the church retained as a burial ground.

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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.