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MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Shoreditch ·
APRIL
12
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Collingwood Street, E2
Collingwood Street was at the heart of the Old Nicol rookery. In 1680, John Nichol of Gray’s Inn leased just over four acres of gardens for 180 years to a London mason, Jon Richardson, with permission to dig for bricks. The land became built up piecemeal with houses. Many of the local streets were named after Nichol.

At least 22 houses were built in Old Nichol Street in 1801-2, probably on the sites of 17th-century ones.

An area of this was named Friar’s Mount probably after James Fryer who farmed it in the 1720s. Friar’s Mount was sold to Sanderson Turner Sturtevant, a tallow chandler who was leasing out ground on the west side of Turk Street by 1804. A John Gadenne was building on the west side of Mount Street in 1807. Mount Street, from Rose Street to Virginia Row, existed by 1806. Nelson Street and Collingwood Streets ran west from Mount Street by 1807.

A garden - Kemp’s Garden - was taken for building at about the same time. Mead built nine houses in Mead Street in 1806 and others were un...

»more

MARCH
31
2021

 

Howard Street, WC2R
Howard Street ran from Surrey Street to Arundel Street until 1974 Norfolk Street and Howard Street were built over the grounds of Arundel House which had been the property of the Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk.

Howard Street was demolished in the 1970s to build Arundel Great Court.
»read full article


MARCH
30
2021

 

Ayres Street, SE1
Ayres Street was formerly known as Whitecross Street Ayres Street changed name in tribute to Alice Ayres - also immortalised in Postman’s Park in the City. Ayres lost her life whilst saving three children from a fire in Union Street in 1885.

John Strype mentions Whitecross Street in his 1720 ’Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster’. He called it "a pretty clean Street, but ordinary Built and Inhabited." It is unknown how long before 1710 that the street was built.

The White Cross Cottages were built in 1890 by social reformer Octavia Hill and designed by Elijah Hoole, as model social housing. They include a hall with interior decoration by Walter Crane.

The dense grain of local small buildings was in part eroded after the Second World War. As redevelopment occurred, larger blocks, occupied by single uses, replaced the Georgian and Victorian houses, shops and warehouses. This is particularly evident in the area between Ayres Street and Southwark Bridge Road.
»read full article


MARCH
29
2021

 

Alpha Grove, E14
Alpha Grove runs from Strafford Street to Tiller Road Alpha Grove ran right through to the West India Dock fence dock - its cranes can be seen at the end of the road. When built in the 1800s, Alpha Road followed a section of the old Island path, Dolphin Lane.

Albert Terrace and Alfred Terrace were rows of houses in Alpha Road.

Alpha Road was renamed Alpha Grove in 1939, and was seriously damaged during WWII.

In 1964 the LCC declared this site as the Manilla Street Clearance Area, and this north end of Alpha Grove became a part of Manilla Street in the Barkantine Estate.

Alpha Road Methodist Chapel (Wesleyan Chapel, Alpha Grove Community Centre) was built in 1887. An additional hall was added in 1926. The buildings were converted into a community centre in the 1970s.
»read full article


MARCH
28
2021

 

Aldgate High Street, EC3N
Once the route to one of the six original gates of the Wall of London, Aldgate High Street has an important place in medieval London’s history Aldgate High Street was closely located to where the eastern part of the original Roman Wall, and in the medieval period, it led to town of Colchester in Essex.

Because of its connection to places outside London, Aldgate High Street was vital to the geography of medieval London. Unfortunately, any archaeological remnants of the Roman gate have been obscured, and there is no evidence of its precise location, but is believed to have straddled Aldgate High Street, the gate’s northern edge beneath the pavement of current address of 1-2 Aldgate High Street, and its southern edge beneath 88-89 Aldgate High Street.

There is some dispute over the etymology and meaning of "Aldgate," but various historians have provided some theories. The earliest record of Aldgate has it listed as East Gate, which makes sense, given its location as the easternmost gate on the Wall.

Another interpretation of its current name, "Ale Gate," indicates that an ale-ho...
»more





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 20:03 GMT   

North Harrow
The North Harrow Embassy Cinema was closed in 1963 and replaced by a bowling alley and a supermarket. As well as the cinema itself there was a substantial restaurant on the first floor.

Source: Embassy Cinema in North Harrow, GB - Cinema Treasures

Reply
Lived here
KJ   
Added: 11 Apr 2021 12:34 GMT   

Family
1900’s Cranmer family lived here at 105 (changed to 185 when road was re-numbered)
James Cranmer wife Louisa ( b.Logan)
They had 3 children one being my grandparent William (Bill) CRANMER married to grandmother “Nancy” He used to go to
Glengall Tavern in Bird in Bush Rd ,now been converted to flats.

Reply
Comment
charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

Reply

Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply
Born here
Beverly Sand   
Added: 3 Apr 2021 17:19 GMT   

Havering Street, E1
My mother was born at 48 Havering Street. That house no longer exists. It disappeared from the map by 1950. Family name Schneider, mother Ray and father Joe. Joe’s parents lived just up the road at 311 Cable Street

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
AUGUST
29
2016

 

Arundel Gardens, W11
Arundel Gardens was built towards the end of the development of the Ladbroke Estate, in the early 1860s. By the 1850s, the Ladbroke family was beginning to sell off freehold parcels of undeveloped land, one of which consisted of the land between the south side of Arundel Gardens and the north side of Ladbroke Gardens.

This was acquired in 1852 by Richard Roy, a solicitor who had already been involved in building speculation in Cheltenham. He appears to have done nothing with the Arundel Gardens part of his land until 1862-3, when building leases were granted for the houses on the south side (numbers 1-47). Around the same time, leases were granted to three other builders to build houses on the north side (Edwin Ware for Nos. 2-14). The survey done by the Ordnance Survey in 1863 shows that the south side was complete by then, but only a few houses had been built on the north side, at the Kensington Park Road end. Building clearly proceeded apace, however, as an 1865 plan, done when the street was given its current name and numbers (it was originally called Lansdowne Road T...
»more


AUGUST
28
2016

 

Polish Social and Cultural Association
The Polski Ośrodek Społeczno-Kulturalny (POSK) is the Polish Social and Cultural Association in London. It was founded and funded in 1967 at 238-246 King Street, Hammersmith where Poles who had escaped the occupation of their country congregated in west London.

POSK promotes Polish culture and art. It houses the Library of Poland in London, which was founded in 1942, exhibitions, film screenings, theatre performances and a regular jazz club. There is also a Polish cafe and a restaurant.
»read full article


AUGUST
27
2016

 

Anchor Terrace, SE1
The streetscape of Anchor Terrace largely involves small late 18th century residential properties
»read full article


AUGUST
26
2016

 

Boreham Wood Baptist Church
The Baptist Church, situated on the corner of Furzehill Road, opened on 14 July 1911. The first baptist chapel was in Station Road, (formerly Gas Works Lane), built by members in memory of Mrs Godfrey, The small chapel was converted into a cinema and called The Little Gem and then became a public toilet and later a flower shop.

The Baptist Church was demolished to make way for Furzehill Parade.
»read full article


AUGUST
26
2016

 

68 Shenley Road
68 Shenley Road was a shop on the corner of Furzehill Road - now disappeared. Later split into three separate shops, Buckingham House covered the present addresses 60-62 Shenley Road and the now demolished number 64. Buckingham House was the name that Richard Lidstone, a drapers, called his new shop which occupied the plot and went up soon after the turn of the twentieth century.

After the Second World War, George Lilley’s was occupying the corner plot of 64 Shenley Road - 62 and 60 had split off into other premises. Lilley’s was an electrical shop which by the 1950s was selling and repairing televisions.

In 1958, the entire block of buildings along Shenley Road between Furzehill Road and Drayton Road was demolished and replaced.

Lilleys was on the corner of Furzehill then Kilbys grocers shop, Co op shoe shop then some cottages, Misses Byers sweet shop with the big tree in front amongst the cottages, Hunts Butchers shop and then Drayton Road.
»read full article


AUGUST
25
2016

 

Brent Lodge
Brent Lodge was built on land which had been part of ’Warren’s Gift’, a charitable estate, sometime between 1817 and 1824. It was a substantial property whose grounds were considerably reduced.

Nearby at Elm Park, west of Nether Street, where building had started in 1882, land was offered in 1900 for good-class villas which were said to be in great demand. By 1908 housing was continuous up to Brent Lodge, which was offered with 26 acres for immediate building.

The Finchley Co-Partnership Society was then formed to lay out a garden village like Hampstead Garden Suburb for the ’less wealthy middle classes’. In 1910 it decided to preserve Brent Lodge and to develop the 24 acres estate on a co-operative system.

The house was demolished in 1962 despite efforts by the comedian Spike Milligan.
»read full article


AUGUST
24
2016

 

Vauxhall Gardens
Vauxhall Gardens was a pleasure garden, one of the leading venues for public entertainment from the mid 17th century to the mid 19th century. Originally known as New Spring Gardens, the site was believed to have opened before the Restoration of 1660 with the first mention being made by Samuel Pepys in 1662.

The Gardens consisted of several acres of trees and shrubs with attractive walks. Initially, entrance was free with food and drink being sold to support the venture.

The site became Vauxhall Gardens in 1785 and admission was charged to gain its many attractions. The Gardens drew all manner of men and supported enormous crowds, with its paths being noted for romantic assignations. Tightrope walkers, hot air balloon ascents, concerts and fireworks provided amusement. The rococo Turkish tent became one of the Gardens' structures, the interior of the Rotunda became one of Vauxhall's most viewed attractions, and the chinoiserie style was a feature of several buildings.

Enormous crowds could be accommodated. In 1749 a rehearsal of Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks attra...
»more


AUGUST
14
2016

 

Myddelton Park, N20
Myddelton Park was built by John Miles before 1882 when he erected All Saints’ Church and vicarage nearby. Extended south along the line of an existing footpath in 1903, Friern Barnet Lane and Oakleigh Road were linked only after this by Myddelton Park.
»read full article


AUGUST
9
2016

 

Newmarket Farm
Newmarket Farm existed until 1855. 47 acres of Newmarket Farm were sold to St Marylebone Burial Board. The cemetery, designed by Barnett and Birch, opened in 1855. The Crematorium was not built until 1937.

To the east of Newmarket Farm, a field provided a cricket ground.

Opposite the cemetery from 1864 was the Convent of the Good Shepherd. In 1873 it became either a reformatory for former female prisoners
or a Magdalene asylum for fallen women. Following a fire in the 1970s most of the buildings were demolished and replaced by Bishop Douglass
School and the Thomas More estate.
»read full article


AUGUST
8
2016

 

Boscobel Street, NW8
Boscobel Street is named after a nearby pub called the Royal Oak. Boscobel House, Staffordshire and its Royal Oak tree became famous as hiding places of King Charles II after his defeat at the Battle of Worcester in 1651.

Charles’s adventure is commemorated by over 500 pubs named the Royal Oak.

The nearby Royal Oak was situated at 2 Princes Road. This pub was present from c.1830 and was demolished in 1898 to make way for the Marylebone Goods Yard, which is now the site of the Lisson Estate.

Boscobel Street was originally named Princes Street but inherited a new moniker in a mass London-wide street renaming where duplicate names were replaced.
»read full article


AUGUST
3
2016

 

Portobello Green
Portobello Green features a shopping arcade under the Westway along Thorpe Close, an open-air market under the canopy, and community gardens. From the 1860s to the 1960s this area was occupied by 5 houses along Portobello Road from the railway embankment, numbers 277 to 287, and two round the corner on the south side of Cambridge Gardens before the entrance to Thorpe Mews. 281 Portobello Road (now the address of the Portobello Green arcade) was AJ Symons confectioner and tobacconist in the 1920s.

Anne McSweeney, who lived across the road in the early 1960s, recalls before the Westway, ‘at the junction with Cambridge Gardens was a bakers shop, where I would be dispatched to get a Farmhouse or Short Tin loaf, and there was a small newsagent shop in Portobello Road on the Cambridge Gardens side just before the railway bridge. It was called Little’s and I was told that it was run by a boxer called Tommy Little. Keep walking down the lane on the same side opposite where all the stalls are, there was a pie and mash shop where I would take a large pudding basin and they would put the pies and mash in it.’»more


AUGUST
2
2016

 

Tavistock Road, W11
Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill. Tavistock Road was developed in the late 1860s alongside the Hammersmith and City railway line from Westbourne Park station, originally as Tavistock Terrace. On the 1900s Charles Booth map, Tavistock Road is described as comfortable mixed/fairly comfortable.

The 1968 Notting Hill Fair/Carnival concluded at the London Free School ’shanty town’ adventure playground between Tavistock Crescent and Tavistock Road, with an ’open air dance’ featuring the mod band the Action, Ginger Johnson, Pure Medicine and a steel band.

The St Luke’s Road corner of Tavistock Road hosted the Metro Youth Club, the scene of Alton Ellis and Aswad gigs and various police incidents in the 1970s.

During the 1976 Carnival Tavistock Road became the riot frontline between the police and youths. The junction with Portobello also appears in the car chase in ’The Squeeze’ film, starring Stacy Keach and Freddie Starr.

The Tavistock junction with...
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AUGUST
1
2016

 

Holland Street, SE1
Today’s Holland Street was originally part of a street called Gravel Lane. George Cunningham in his survey of London’s streets, buildings and monuments gave an explanation for the name Holland Street, saying that is was the “location of the old moated Manor House of Paris Garden, subsequently notorious under the name of Holland’s Leaguer, from Holland, a procuress (an early name for a “woman who procures prostitutes”), who occupied it in Charles I’s time. The old Manor House was a favourite resort of James I and his Court, George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham and the nobility generally.”

Holland was Sarah Holland who in 1631 had been charged as an “incontinent women” and imprisoned in Newgate. The Manor House was very suitable for her needs as she said it was “near the theatres and baiting rings, with their wild beasts and gladiators”.

Holland Street’s name became applied to Hopton Street as well before the latter was renamed after the almshouses which lay along it.
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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.