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Featured · Hampstead Garden Suburb ·
December
4
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Elephant Field
The grazing elephants of Hampstead Garden Suburb... One of the last occupiers of nearby Park Farm was the circus proprietor Lord George Sanger, who retired there in 1904, and was notoriously murdered by a farm hand in 1911. His descendants continued the circus in operation until the 1960s.

When the circus was not touring, Sanger would put his elephants out of pasture in what would become, in a few years, Hampstead Garden Suburb.

An elderly former resident of Denman Drive - constructed in 1908 on what was once Westminster Abbey’s land - used to recall ‘elephants grazing’ in the field between Big Wood and Little Wood, before Denman Drive North and Denman Drive South - constructed in 1912 on what was once the Bishop’s land - were completed.

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OCTOBER
22
2021

 

East Street, SE17
East Street, famous for its market, is likely to have been the birthplace of Charlie Chaplin, although no birth certificate exists There had been street trading in the Walworth area since the 16th century, when farmers rested their livestock on Walworth Common before continuing to the city.

In the 17th century, the area through which East Street now runs was rural fields and common land where people could graze their animals. The area to the north was known as ‘Lock’s Field’ and, even in 1878, was described as little more than ‘a dreary swamp’.

Most of the land in the area was owned by the Church, but some was eventually sold or leased. By the 1770s, some land near the junction with Old Kent Road (known then simply as The Kent Road) was cultivated as a flower nursery by the Driver family, who were also responsible for commissioning the grand buildings at nearby Surrey Square.

A legal document from 1780 describes the sale of the land which led to the creation of East Street as a public highway, connecting Walworth Road wit...
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OCTOBER
21
2021

 

George Street, TW9
George Street is the high street in Richmond and was one of the first streets to be developed in the town Previously known as Great Street, George Street was renamed after King George III in 1769.

Buildings on the street include the Grade II listed Greyhound House, formerly the Greyhound Hotel in a building dating from the 1730s. The facade of the former General Post Office building at 70–72 George Street, now a retail store, incorporates the coat of arms of the former Municipal Borough of Richmond, which existed from 1890 to 1965.
»read full article


OCTOBER
20
2021

 

BT Tower, W1W
The BT Tower is a communications tower, previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower The main tower structure is 177 metres high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191 metres. The building was designed by the architects of the Ministry of Public Building and Works: Eric Bedford and G. R. Yeats.

The structure was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO) and its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country. It replaced a much shorter tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links’ "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage.

The narrow cylindrical shape was chosen because of the requirements of the communications aerials: the building shifts no more than 25 centimetres in high wind speeds. Initially, th...
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OCTOBER
19
2021

 

Kilburn Toll
The Kilburn Toll Gate dated from 1710 The main road out of London towards the northwest was Watling Street. It had fallen into serious disrepair given its important status. A new source of funds was needed to maintain the highway. In 1710, a turnpike was established improving the road quality tremendously. There was a toll gate at Kilburn Bridge to charge road users at the entrance to Willesden parish.

Kilburn Toll Gate was situated at the southern end of Kilburn High Road beside the junction with Kilburn Priory.

After 1827, the Metropolitan Turnpike Trust was the body responsible for maintaining the main roads in the north of the conurbation of London. The commissioners took over from fourteen existing turnpike trusts, including the one at Kilburn, and were empowered to levy tolls to meet the costs of road maintenance.

Later the tollgate was moved to Shoot Up Hill before the turnpike was abolished altogether in 1872 as the Metropolitan Turnpike Trust was disbanded. The toll s...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

Reply
Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

JANUARY
30
2018

 

Cissbury Ring South, N12
Cissbury Ring South is one of the roads of the Woodside Park Garden Suburb. The founder of the Woodside Park Garden Suburb, Fred Ingram, built more and more roads and houses, retaining the character of the earlier developments. Walmington Fold, Lullington Garth and Chanctonbury Way grew outwards from the original nucleus and Poynings Way, Steynings Way, Saddlescombe Way, Cissbury Ring, Pyecombe Corner, Folkington Corner, Wolstonbury, Offham Slope and Rodmell Slope also materialised.
»read full article


JANUARY
28
2018

 

Heathcote Street, WC1N
Heathcote Street is in the north-east corner of the Foundling Hospital estate, leading from St George’s Gardens to Gray’s Inn Road. It was named after Michael Heathcote, Governor of the Foundling Hospital from 1810

A gate once stood here to bar access to Mecklenburgh Square, in an attempt by the estate to make this a more desirable residential area.

Its remaining houses were mainly destroyed in the Second World War
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JANUARY
27
2018

 

Shepherd’s Bush Place, W12
Shepherd’s Bush Place was formerly known as Providence Place. Geograph mentioned Shepherd’s Bush Place as a "remarkable local survivor, hard by Shepherd’s Bush Green and now also Westfield Shopping Centre and the new Central Line station..."

Most of the street still has the original Victorian terraces lining it.
»read full article


JANUARY
26
2018

 

The Prince Albert
Originally called the Albert Tavern, the Prince Albert public house is a three storey building dating from 1866-68. It was extended in 1871 and is attributed to the architect Joseph Tanner. The building is symmetrical about the corner with four bays to Albert Bridge Road and four to Parkgate Road of the same architectural composition of four round headed windows to first and second floors with rendered arches linked to capitals. The ground floor is glazed red faience whilst upper floors are yellow stock brick.

It is now the oldest building on Albert Bridge Road.
»read full article


JANUARY
25
2018

 

Rose Croft Gardens, NW2
Rose Croft Gardens is a cul-de-sac off of Dollis Hill Lane. In the 1920s and 30s new housing estates sprang up in Neasden and Oxgate, which brought thousands of people into the area. In the early 20s the North Circular Road was cut through the middle of the parish, and towards the end of that decade the Nicol Estate was built on its north side, and the Brentwater Estate on its other side. Braintcroft School was opened in 1928, and Wykeham School in 1930.

Neasden Golf Course began to be eaten away in 1926, and in 1929 the contents of the clubhouse were auctioned off. Within a year the golf course was covered by the houses of the “Dollis Park” estate to its eastern boundary at Vincent Gardens. The last country landmark in Neasden Lane, Jackman’s Forge, disappeared to make room for the new shopping parade. A new church hall for St Catherine’s Church was opened in 1928, and the old parish room which had been built in 1907 was demolished.

At the turn of the decade Neasden Recreation Ground was formed, t...
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JANUARY
24
2018

 

York Place, WC2N
York Place marks the location of a house on this site. York Place was built on the site in the 14th century for the bishops of Norwich â
»read full article


JANUARY
21
2018

 

Dollis Hill Farm
Dollis Hill Farm was situated to the north of Dollis Hill Lane. At the beginning of the nineteenth century, the Finch family, one of the two important local families, bought up several pieces of land to make the Dollis Hill Estate. This included two farms, with the main farmhouse north of Dollis Hill Lane and the smaller one opposite it on the south. The farms around Willesden were well known for their hay, grown for the horses of London, and there were dairy farms producing milk.

Originally the estate lands were more extensive and a large 17th century house, rebuilt in 1800, was used as Dollis Hill Farm.

In 1825 the family had enough money to replace the smaller farmhouse with a new house, named Dollis Hill House. Things did not go so well for them after 1850, when Henry Finch lost his lucrative post at the Royal Mint, so in 1861 they moved back into Dollis Hill Farm, and rented Dollis Hill House to Sir Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, who later became Lord Tweedmouth.

The farm halted as a working farm in...
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JANUARY
20
2018

 

Neasden
Neasden was first recorded as ’Neasdun’ in AD 939, derived from the Old English neos = ’nose’ and dun = ’hill’. Neasden could be seen for afar as a ’nose-shaped hill’ in its rural past as it had been a countryside hamlet on the western end of the Dollis Hill ridge. The land was owned by St. Paul’s Cathedral. In medieval times, the village consisted only of several small buildings around the green near the site of the present Neasden roundabout.

In the 15th–17th century the Roberts family were the major landowners in the area. Thomas Roberts erected Neasden House (on the site of the modern Clifford Court) in the reign of Henry VIII. In 1651 Sir William Roberts bought confiscated church lands. After the Restoration the estates were returned to the ownership of the Church but were leased out to the Roberts family. Sir William improved Neasden House and by 1664 it was one of the largest houses in the Willesden parish.

During the 18th century the Nicoll family replaced the Roberts as the dominant family in Neasden. In the 19th century these farmers a...
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JANUARY
18
2018

 

Gipsy Hill, SE19
Gipsy Hill is the name of the main road that runs from Gipsy Road, near its junction with South Croxted Road, up to Westow Hill in Upper Norwood. Gipsy Hill takes its name from the presence of Gipsies in what was a relatively remote rural area until Gipsy Hill railway station was opened in 1856. On 11 August 1668, Samuel Pepys recorded in his diary that his wife had visited "the gypsies at Lambeth"; they may well have been located in this area.
»read full article


JANUARY
17
2018

 

Homestead Park, NW2
Homestead Park consists of twenty one dwelling-houses located on the north side of Dollis Hill Lane. By the time of the First World War the suburban expansion of Willesden along Neasden Lane and Dudden Hill Lane had reached the outskirts of Neasden, which was then a rural village.

Neasden Green incorporated a number of large houses and estates whose owners were resisting the suburban tide. Gladstone Park, on the south side of Dollis Hill Lane and Neasden Golf course to the north were acting as barriers to further development.

The break up of the Neasden estates and the catalyst of development, came in the form of the North Circular Road from Neasden Lane to Edgware Road began which began in January 1921 and was completed two years later. The North Circular Road opened up the Brentwater estate on the north side of Dollis Hill Ridge to housing development in the late 1920s. This period of encroaching development posed its greatest threat to Neasden Golf Club, which began with the selling of a slice of land for housing development in 1926.

E...
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JANUARY
16
2018

 

Queen Street, EC4R
Queen Street is a street in the City of London which runs between Upper Thames Street and Cheapside. It is split between two postcode areas - EC4N and EC4R.

The thoroughfares of Queen Street and King Street (a northward continuation of Queen Street beyond Cheapside) were newly laid out, cutting across more ancient routes in the City, following the Great Fire of London in 1666; they were the only notable new streets following the fire's destruction of much of the City.

At the lower (southern) end of Queen Street is Southwark Bridge. The London Chamber of Commerce & Industry is located at No. 33. At the upper (northern) end the street crosses Cheapside and becomes King Street, which leads to Gresham Street and the Guildhall. This creates a direct route from the River Thames at Southwark Bridge up to the Guildhall. Queen Street meets the newer Queen Victoria Street as well as Cannon Street. Minor roads off the street include Skinners Lane (the home of the Worshipful Company of Skinners) and Cloak Lane.

Two short sections of the street are ped...
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JANUARY
15
2018

 

Adelphi Terrace, WC2N
Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s. The Adam brothers created an elegant residential district raised on high arches, with the lower streets under-ground at Thames level.

When the [[81319|Adelphi]] scheme was first proposed, Mr. Coutts, of the Strand, being anxious to preserve the views over the Kent and Surrey hills, which the back windows of his banking house had, purchased a share of the Durham Gardens property, and arranged with the Adam brothers that the new streets should be laid out as to preserve the vista.

Robert Street was accordingly planned as to form a frame for the wealthy banker’s landscape. The piece of land between William Street and John Street was at that time occupied by his strong rooms, connected underground with the office, and built up only to the level of the Strand. When it became necessary to enlarge his premises he procured a special Act of Parliament for throwing an arch over William Street.
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JANUARY
14
2018

 

The Adelphi
The Adelphi is a small district surrounding the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street. The district is named after the Adelphi Buildings, a block of 24 unified neoclassical terrace houses occupying the land between The Strand and the River Thames in the parish of St Martin in the Fields, which also included a headquarters building for the "Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce" (now generally known as the Royal Society of Arts). They were built between 1768-72, by the Adam brothers (John, Robert, James and William Adam), to whom the buildings@@@ Greek-derived name refers. The ruins of Durham House on the site were demolished for their construction. The nearby Adelphi Theatre is named after the Adelphi Buildings. Robert Adam was influenced by his extensive visit to Diocletian@@@s Palace in Dalmatia, and applied some of this influence to the design of the neoclassical Adelphi Buildings.

Adelphi has no formally defined boundaries, though they are generally agreed to be: Strand to the north, Lancaster Place to the east, Victoria Emb...
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JANUARY
13
2018

 

Melrose Avenue, WD6
Melrose Avenue was the first built of Borehamwood’s ’poet’ roads. The ’poets’ roads of Borehamwood were named by David Scott-Blackhall, Chief Housing Officer of the Elstree Rural District Council and himself a published poet.

He wanted to name a road after Sir Walter Scott by calling one Scott Avenue. However, as David’s surname was ’Scott-Blackhall’, he was afraid that people might think he had immodestly named the road after himself.

Therefore it became Melrose Avenue, after Sir Walter Scott’s connections with Melrose Abbey ,in the Scottish Borders.
»read full article


JANUARY
12
2018

 

Lullington Garth, N12
Lullington Garth is an oddly named road in Woodside Park. In the late 1920s, Mr FCJ ("Fred") Ingram conceived the creation of a new housing estate served by its own cluster of shops and near to Woodside Park station. He began buying land on the western side of the Dollis Brook and as far north as the confluence of Folly Brook with Dollis Brook. He promoted the proposed development as a 100-acre "garden suburb" with a maximum of eight houses to the acre.

He named the new roads after rural areas of Sussex where frequented in his youth. The three-bedroom semi-detached houses were to be of consistent but not uniform design. The roads were to be laid out with ornamental trees and grass verges and the built-up area was to be surrounded by parkland and open fields, with footpath access to the beautiful Totteridge Valley.

Lullington Garth was ultimately named after the village of Lullington in Sussex whereas a garth is the cloister garden of a medieval monastery.
»read full article


JANUARY
11
2018

 

Wilton Crescent, SW1X
Wilton Crescent is notable for its affluent and politically important list of residents, present and historic. Wilton Crescent was created by Thomas Cundy II, the Grosvenor family estate surveyor, and was drawn up with the original 1821 Wyatt plan for Belgravia. It was named at the time of Thomas Egerton, 2nd Earl of Wilton, second son of Robert Grosvenor, 1st Marquess of Westminster on whose estate the road was built in 1825.

In the 19th and 20th centuries, it was home to many prominent British politicians, ambassadors and civil servants. Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1900–1979) lived at 2 Wilton Crescent for many years, marked today by an attributive blue plaque. Akin to nearby developments, Wilton Crescent is characterised by grand terraces with lavish white houses which are built in a crescent shape, many of them with stuccoed balconies, particularly on the southern part of the crescent. The Portland stone-clad, five-storey houses toward the north are high and were refaced between 1908 and 1912 via architects Balfour and Turner. Most of the houses had o...
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JANUARY
10
2018

 

Hyde Park Corner, W1J
Hyde Park Corner is a major road junction at the southeastern corner of Hyde Park. Six streets converge at the junction: Park Lane (from the north), Piccadilly (northeast), Constitution Hill (southeast), Grosvenor Place (south), Grosvenor Crescent (southwest) and Knightsbridge (west).

Hyde Park Corner tube station, a London Underground station served by the Piccadilly line, is located at the junction, as are a number of notable monuments.

Immediately to the north of the junction is Apsley House, the home of the first Duke of Wellington; several monuments to the Duke were erected in the vicinity, both in his lifetime and subsequently.

In the mid-nineteenth century, the space that is now the Hyde Park Corner traffic island was not entirely surrounded by roadway. In its centre stands the Wellington Arch (or Constitution Arch), designed by Decimus Burton and planned as a northern gate to the grounds of Buckingham Palace. In execution it was laid out as a gate into the Green Park, and was originally sited directly opposite Bur...
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JANUARY
9
2018

 

Island Gardens
Island Gardens is an area of the Isle of Dogs opposite Greenwich. The 1.12-hectare waterside park at Island Gardnes is notable for its spectacular cross-river view of the classical buildings of the former Greenwich Hospital, the Cutty Sark and the National Maritime Museum, with Greenwich Park forming a backdrop. The northern entrance of the Greenwich foot tunnel is also within the park. It is almost certain that the view from this location is the one that the Canaletto painting ’Greenwich Hospital from the North Bank of the Thames’ is taken from, though whether Canaletto himself actually visited the site is in doubt. The park was formally opened on 3 August 1895 by local politician Will Crooks.

The 19th century name for the area was North Greenwich. It was named for the now defunct North Greenwich railway station (1872), that served a former passenger ferry to Greenwich and stood near the later Island Gardens (1897) and Greenwich foot tunnel (1902).

The park gave its name to Island Gardens DLR station. This opened i...
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JANUARY
8
2018

 

Mudchute Park
Mudchute Park and Farm is a large urban park and farm just south of Canary Wharf on the Isle of Dogs. It is a Local Nature Reserve and a Site of Metropolitan Importance for Nature Conservation. The name of the site is a testament to the engineering overspill when Millwall Dock was being constructed in the 1860s. Spoil from the excavation of the Dock, and silt from its channels and waterways were dumped on nearby land, using a conveyor system.

The park now covers 13 hectares, and the local authority describes the farm as the largest urban farm in Europe.

The Millwall Dock Company owned a huge swathe of land across the Isle of Dogs as it intended to extend the docks to meet the Thames in the east one day, when there was enough business to justify it. Until then, the company kept the land undeveloped, mostly leasing it out for pasture. This was also the case of the later Mudchute (or ’Mud Shoot’ as it was originally spelled in official documents).

The name "Mudchute" derives from it being the former dumping ground for mud dredged from the ...
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JANUARY
7
2018

 

Greenwich Peninsula
The Greenwich Peninsula is bounded on three sides by a loop of the Thames, between the Isle of Dogs to the west and Silvertown to the east.
Formerly known as Greenwich Marshes and as Bugsby’s Marshes, it became known as East Greenwich as it developed in the 19th century, but more recently has been called North Greenwich due to the location of the North Greenwich tube station. This should not be confused with North Greenwich on the Isle of Dogs, at the north side of a former ferry from Greenwich.

The peninsula was drained by Dutch engineers in the 16th century, allowing it to be used as pasture land. In the 17th century, Blackwall Point (the northern tip of the peninsula, opposite Blackwall) gained notoriety as a location where pirates’ corpses were hung in cages as a deterrent to other would-be pirates. In the 1690s the Board of Ordnance established a gunpowder magazine on the west side of the peninsula, which was in operation by 1695 serving as the government’s primary magazine (where newly-milled powder was stored prior to being distributed, on board specially-equipped hoys, to wherever it ...
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JANUARY
6
2018

 

Blackwall Tunnel
The Blackwall Tunnel is a pair of road tunnels which pass underneath the River Thames. The tunnel links the London Borough of Tower Hamlets with the Royal Borough of Greenwich, and forms part of the A102 road.

A tunnel in the Blackwall area was originally proposed in the 1880s. According to Robert Webster, then MP for St Pancras East, a tunnel would "be very useful to the East End of London, a district representing in trade and commerce a population greater than the combined populations of Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham." By this time, all road bridges in London east of the ferry at Chiswick were toll-free, but these were of little use to the two fifths of London’s population that lived to the east of London Bridge. The Thames Tunnel (Blackwall) Act was created in August 1887, which provided the legal framework necessary to construct the tunnel. The initial proposal, made by Sir Joseph Bazalgette, called for three parallel tunnels, two for vehicular traffic and one for foot, with an expected completion date of works within seven years. It was orig...
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JANUARY
5
2018

 

Shroffold Road, BR1
Shroffold Road takes its name from the former Shroffolds Farm. Shroffolds Farm itself was situated in Whitefoot Lane and was owned by the Earl of Northbrook.

The future Downham housing estate was built over the farmland between 1920 and 1923.
»read full article


JANUARY
4
2018

 

St Michael Queenhithe
St. Michael Queenhithe was a church in the City of London located in what is now Upper Thames Street. First recorded in the 12th century, the church was destroyed during the Great Fire of London in 1666. Rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren, it was demolished in 1876.





»read full article


JANUARY
3
2018

 

The back gardens of Hazelbank Road (1915)
The view from the rear of 133 Hazelbank Road in Lewisham across Shroffold’s Farm, 1915 While London seems to have surburbanised quickly between the world wars, it actually grew in sudden spurts between housing slumps. There were many slowdowns in building in the nineteenth century and, after the Wall Street crash, a slowdown in the twentieth century too.

Sometimes building speculation would part build an area, leaving gaps for a decade or two where the old farms would carry on.

This was true for areas now considered part of inner London such as Lewisham. Hazelbank Road stretched southwest-northeast but Shroffold’s Farm was still a going concern at the back of the new housing.
»read full article


JANUARY
2
2018

 

Whitehouse Avenue, WD6
Whitehouse Avenue was originally to be called Cornwall Avenue. Whitehouse Farm was situated on Furzehill Road, dated to the 18th century and originally spread over 200 acres. It was owned by the Church of England.

After the railway became established in the area, the population grew and as new industries were introduced more houses and roads were required, Drayton Road being the first in Boreham Wood. Developers began buying plots of land, mainly off of Shenley Road and Whitehouse Farm began to shrink. Road building off the north side of Shenley Road reached by 1918 as far to the east as Clarendon Road.

Between the wars, the founding of the film studios and work starting on the Laings estate off Elstree Way, resulted in large areas of farmland being lost. Postwar, the London County Council needed land to house London’s ‘population overspill’ and made a compulsory purchase of Laing’s land off Elstree Way, as well as farmland to the east of Theobald Street.

Whitehouse Avenue was started in the la...
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JANUARY
1
2018

 

Ladbroke Grove, W11
Ladbroke Grove is the main street in London W11. The story of the first, southern part of Ladbroke Grove dates back to the 1820s.

Much of the area was owned by the Ladbroke family who also had holdings in Kensington. In 1821, a nephew of the family, James Weller inherited the estate, and according to the conditions of the will of his uncle was forced to change his name to James Weller Ladbroke. He put in train the project to build up the area with Victorian town houses for the gentry.

Large parts of this area became the scene of a layout quite unlike anything previously, or indeed subsequently, to be found in London. Building development was spread over some fifty years, between 1821 and the mid 1870s, but the most intense activity took place between 1840 and 1868. Half-a-dozen architects and a rather larger number of major speculators were all involved in the evolution of the layout.

Under the terms of his uncle's will James Weller Ladbroke could only grant leases of up to twenty-one ye...
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