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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Tower Gardens ·
MARCH
3
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Risley Avenue, N17
Risley Avenue is part of the Tower Gardens Estate. The Tower Gardens Estate has a very special place in the history of Council house building. It was one of the first ’garden suburbs’ in the world and its architecture is of extremely high quality.

At the turn of the twentieth century Tottenham was a suburb served by new railways and at the end of the tram lines. It was surrounded by fields which the newly formed London County Council (LCC ) could acquire using as-yet hardly-used powers to buy land and build housing.

Early experiments in housing design for workers had produced beautiful picturesque estates outside London modelled on traditional rural housing, such as Port Sunlight and Bourneville. They were designed by some of the most progressive architects of their day and funded by rich social reformers. Their architectural philosophy respected co-operation between architects and craftspeople and was called the ’Arts and Crafts Movement’.

The LCC wanted to improve housing conditi...

»more

FEBRUARY
13
2021

 

Crouch Hill
Crouch Hill is a railway station as well as a street in north London The area of Crouch Hill was still mostly farmland until Crouch Hill station opened in July 1868.

After the railway arrived, housebuilding started in earnest. Each of the road called Crouch Hill, John Farrer built Cecile Park in the 1880s and 1890s. To the west, W.J. Collins was at work at the same time.

Between the two world wars, Crouch Hill saw council housing appears. In 1972, the Holly Park estate’s 17-storey Ilex House was completed.

Crouch Hill crosses over the Parkland Walk, a public foot and cycle path and linear park that stretches from Finsbury Park to Alexandra Palace, and follows some of the course of the Northern Heights planned rail extension to the Northern line, abandoned on 9 February 1954.

Since January 2010, trains from Crouch Hill run every 15 minutes in each direction, towards either Gospel Oak or Barking throughout the day.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
12
2021

 

St Ann’s Villas, W11
St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road The Norland estate had been 52 acres of ground, bounded on the east by the streets now known as Portland Road and Pottery Lane, on the south by Holland Park Avenue. By the mid 1830s, Norland was looking attractive for speculative building.

In 1836, the incorporation of the Birmingham, Bristol and Thames Junction Railway occurred. The company proposed the construction of a line from Willesden to the Kensington Canal. The route authorised was north-south a few yards outside the western boundary of the Norland estate, across the Uxbridge Road at Shepherd’s Bush.

Drainage problems posed by the construction of the railway promoted the development of the Norland Estate. Between the Uxbridge and Hammersmith roads the railway was to extend along or very close to the course of the Counter’s Creek sewer, the natural open ditch which discharged surface water into the Kensington Canal. In 1837–8 the Westminster Commissioners of Sewers insisted that the railway ...
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FEBRUARY
11
2021

 

Severus Road, SW11
Severus Road is almost opposite the main entrance to Clapham Junction station and runs down to Eckstein Road In 1885, the area which became Severus Road and other local streets consisted of meadowland and gardens. In that year and for the following four years, builder Alfred Heaver and architect C. J.Bentley went to work. Having paid £16 000 for the land, Heaver named the area St John’s Park and proceeded to build 225 houses on five streets.

Most of the land was acquired from the Whiting family. Also included was George Alder’s former house on St John’s Hill, which gave main-road access from the north. The area was bounded on the east by St John’s Road and to the south by Battersea Rise.

Alfred Heaver suggested names for the new roads: Markfield Road, Winton Road, Manbury Road and Danehurst Road. Boutflower Road already existed as a lane. The Metropolitan Board of Works rejected the new road names as ’unsuitable’ and suggested instead, rather exotically, Aliwal Road, Comyn Road, Eckstein Road and Severus Road. Boutflower Road, for the existing lane,...
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FEBRUARY
10
2021

 

Philharmonic Hall
The Philharmonic Hall was a major music hall throughout the 1860s and early 1870s The Philharmonic Hall was built by the contractors Holland and Hannen on the site of some former tenements. It opened with a banquet on 7 November 1860. The Hall was the first of many places of entertainment that would be built on this site, culminating in the Islington Empire of 1908.

The Hall was redecorated in 1874 and the building was also renamed the Philharmonic Theatre, with a seating capacity for some 758 people. Alas it was destroyed by fire in September 1882. The Grand Theatre opened on its site in August 1883.

Like its predecessor, the (first) Grand Theatre was destroyed by fire, this time only four years after being built, during the staging of the annual Christmas pantomime on 29 December 1887.

The owners, Holt and Wilmot, immediately set about rebuilding the Theatre with Frank Matcham again doing the redesign. The second Grand Theatre reopened a year later on 1 December 1888 with a production of ’The Still Alarm’.
...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

Reply

   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
AUGUST
31
2019

 

Cannon Street, EC4R
Cannon Street follows the route of a riverside path that ran along the Thames. Linking the Monument to St Paul’s Churchyard, Cannon Street does not refer to cannons at all but to candles - being the street of the candlemakers and first appearing in 1183 as ’Candelwrichstrete’ (’Candlewright Street’). The City ward of Candlewick come from the original name before it was corrupted.

In the late Victorian period, Cannon Street was occupied by large warehouses - especially of cotton goods. It had been lengthened and widened in the mid-1850s, clearing away a maze of small streets. Cannon Street station as the new terminus of the South-Eastern Railway opened in 1866.

The London Stone, from which distances were measured in Roman times, was originally situated in the middle of Cannon Street.
»read full article


AUGUST
25
2019

 

Anthony Street, E1
Anthony Street previously ran from Commercial Road through to Cable Street. Just a few metres survive. This part of Anthony Street was formerly known as Catherine Street with the oldest section of the street, always called Anthony Street, further south. It was combined into one street during the 1880s but largely swept away in the 1960s.

The Commercial Road had been built in 1803 as a conduit for newly arrived goods from the Isle of Dogs straight into the City of London. Catherine Street (Anthony Street) was a turning to the south.

As the nineteenth century progressed, the street became occupied by the Jewish community with the community surviving into the 1960s.

As a teenager in post-war years, the playwright Steven Berkoff lived for a time in Anthony Street. His father Abraham had run a successful tailor’s shop in Leman Street. The family’s move to the United States was unsuccessful, so they returned to two rooms and an outside WC, with chickens in the yard, in Anthony Street.

In 1958 much of the street was subject to a...
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AUGUST
23
2019

 

Edgware bus station
Edgware Bus Station lies behind Edgware train station. In August 2009, writer Tanya Gold attempted to be the writer in residence at the bus station emulating Alain de Botton who had a similar position at Heathrow Airport.


»read full article


AUGUST
20
2019

 

Abbey Wood
Between Plumstead to the west and Erith to the east, Abbey Wood takes its name from the nearby Lesnes Abbey and Bostall Woods. The original 19th century Abbey Wood (known locally as The Village) is the area immediately south of Abbey Wood railway station, built where Knee Hill became Harrow Manorway and crossed the railway (North Kent Line). This is now the centre where three phases of house building (almost) meet.

The Royal Arsenal Co-operative Society (RACS) bought two farms on the hillside to the south and between 1900 and 1930 built the Bostall Estate. Once known as Tin Check Island after the Society’s dividend system, this has streets named for Co-operative themes (Alexander McLeod, Rochdale, Robert Owen, Congress), a school & shops but no pubs.

Between 1956 & 1959 the London County Council built the Abbey Estate on former Royal Arsenal marshland to the north (between the railway and the Southern Outfall sewer bank heading for Crossness). Predominently conventional brick houses with gardens, equipped with shopping centres, schools and open spaces, the estate...
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AUGUST
15
2019

 

Bush Theatre
The Bush Theatre is located in the Passmore Edwards Public Library, Shepherd’s Bush. The Bush Theatre was established in 1972 to showcase for the work of new writers. The theatre strives to create a space which nurtures and develops new artists and their work. The Bush Theatre has produced many premieres, many of them Bush Theatre commissions, and hosted guest productions by theatre companies and artists from across the world.


»read full article


AUGUST
12
2019

 

Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art
The Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, formerly the Webber Douglas School of Singing and Dramatic Art, was a drama school, and originally a singing school. It was one of the leading drama schools in Britain, and offered comprehensive training for those intending to pursue a professional performance career. During its 100-year history, the Academy produced many established actors of stage and screen, including Angela Lansbury, Julian Fellowes, Antony Sher, Donald Sinden, Hugh Bonneville, Minnie Driver, Amanda Root, Julia Ormond, Terence Stamp, Natalie Dormer, and Miranda Raison.

The school was founded in London in 1926 as the Webber Douglas School of Singing, by Walter Johnstone Douglas and Amherst Webber. It was created from the singing academy founded in 1906 in Paris by Jean de Reszke. By 1932 the school had added full theatrical training to its curriculum, and it was renamed the Webber Douglas School of Singing and Dramatic Art. It was located at 30 Clareville St in South Kensington.

In 2006, the academy was absorbed into the Royal Central School of Speech and Drama. Many of the academy’s past alumni ha...
»more


AUGUST
10
2019

 

Shepherd’s Bush Village Hall
Shepherd’s Bush Village Hall is a Victorian building on Wood Lane. Shepherd’s Bush Village Hall was originally constructed as a drill hall for the 1st City of London Volunteer Artillery. It is now a community centre.

The London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham sold it to Wigoder Family Foundation in 2012. Among the charities which continue to use it is the West London School of Dance.

Shepherd’s Bush Village Hall falls within the Shepherd’s Bush Conservation Area.
»read full article


AUGUST
8
2019

 

Abbey Road
Not a zebra crossing in sight. Abbey Road DLR station is built on the original route of the Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway which opened between Stratford and Canning Town stations in 1846. The line became part of what is now known as the North London Line in 1979. The Eastern Counties and Thames Junction Railway had four tracks over this section of route. The western pair were redeveloped as part of an extension to the London Underground’s Jubilee Line in 1999 and the eastern pair, which carried the North London Line service, were cut back at Stratford in 2006. The tracks were converted for use as part of the Docklands Light Railway.

The area between Canning Town and Stratford has been identified for major regeneration and new development as part of the Lower Lea Valley. The street that it serves is named after the nearby Stratford Langthorne Abbey.

The station is nowhere near the other, better-known Abbey Road of Beatles fame, with the celebrated zebra crossing near St...
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AUGUST
7
2019

 

Grantham Road, E12
Grantham Road, with Church Road, forms a crescent to the east of Dersingham Avenue. Manor Park was, until the late nineteenth century, called Little Ilford. It referred to the small crossing over the River Hile which was the former name of the Roding. The river was prone to flooding.

An alehouse stood on the site of the former Three Rabbits pub (on the corner of Rabbits Road) since the 1630s. It probably took its name from a rabbit warren on the old Aldersbrook estate which gave its name to Warren Avenue. The pub was used by dealers trading at the annual cattle fairs on Wanstead Flats until the nineteenth century.

Between 1829 and 1831, a prison called the Little Ilford House of Correction was built on the site of the current site of Gloucester Road and Worcester Road. It was demolished in 1878 and some of its rubble was used in the construction of local houses.

The area subsequently received its ’Manor Park’ name due to Manor Park railway station which took its name from the home of the Lord of the Manor of West Ham w...
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AUGUST
6
2019

 

Conway Crescent, UB6
Conway Crescent was a 1930 estate of privately-built homes. By the 1840s, Perivale was former wheat fields - which had grown wheat of some prestige - had been converted to grow hay. The coming of the Grand Union Canal made the formerly isolated village better connected to serve London’s growing population of horses. John Betjeman’s poem ’Return to Ealing’ states:

"...And a gentle gale from Perivale / blows up the hayfield scent."

The population of Perivale remained very low until the start of the twentieth century. In 1901, the census counted only 60 people.

In the 1930s, the Western Avenue was built, running east-west across the fields of Perivale and led to its rapid expansion. In the 1930s, many factories and houses arrived in Perivale. The Hoover Building opened in 1932 and employed more than 3000 people at its height. Sanderson’s wallpaper factory also went up in 1929, eventually employing some 2000.

In contrast to the pattern of development in many of neighbouring subu...
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AUGUST
5
2019

 

Avenue Road, DA6
Avenue Road runs south from Bexleyheath railway station. Avenue Road took its name from its distinct avenue of elm trees. The line of trees led to the Manor House which had been built in 1769 by William Wheatley. In 1858 the house was pulled down and in August 1874 the Wheatley estate was sold off fetching c.£170,000. The open land being sold for building development including new homes. Large detached houses were built, starting in the south end of the street.

Market gardening remained the main local industry which benefited greatly with the coming of the railway to Bexleyheath in 1895. By the turn of the twentieth century, large nurseries had appeared on both sides of the road.

The railway fuelled development and the market gardens gave way to further housing.

Sadly, The trees were felled in 1936, bringing the streetscape into line with many others locally.
»read full article


AUGUST
3
2019

 

Raasay Street, SW10
Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove. Raasay Street was a poor street in the enclave of World’s End, Chelsea. It had been built over the hirtherto fashionable Cremorne Gardens.

Many of the local streets were demolished during 1969/70 to clear the area for the building of the World’s End Estate. Along with Raasay Street, Bifron Street, Dartrey Road, Luna Street, Seaton Street and Vicat Street all disappeared under the bulldozer.

Opposite the entrance to Raasay Street was 80 Edith Grove. On 12 July 1962, the Rolling Stones (calling themselves ’The Rollin Stone’) rented 102 Edith Grove in anticipation of their first gig at the Marquee.
»read full article


AUGUST
2
2019

 

Weymouth Avenue, W5
Weymouth Avenue dates from the period of the First World War. Little Ealing village existed by 1650 and was situated where Little Ealing Lane and Northfield Avenue (then Northfield Lane) and Windmill Road (then Windmill Lane) met. The manor house of Coldhall lay along Little Ealing Lane between the village and South Ealing Road. Until the late 19th century Little Ealing was only a small hamlet.

In 1883, the Metropolitan District Railway built its Hounslow extention as a branch from Acton Town. At first there were two stations in the area - South Ealing and Boston Road (now Boston Manor). By 1908, the Northfields area begun to develop and a halt was built. The station and platforms were then on the west side of Northfield Avenue.

The bridge where Weymouth Avenue now crosses the railway, preceded the laying out of the road and linked the right of way which connected Little Ealing and Allacross Road. Weymouth Road built to connect Little Ealing Lane northwards to Windermere Road, integrated this bridge which forced th...
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AUGUST
1
2019

 

Pottery Lane, W11
Pottery Lane takes its name from the brickfields which were situated at the northern end of the street. The local soil was stiff clay and after 1818, the clay begun to be dug out here and used for brickmaking to supply London’s growing suburbs. Bricks and tiles were stored in sheds lining Pottery Lane and were fired in large kilns. Parts of the diggings flooded and a particular area became known as ’The Ocean’. Rubbish and effluent ended up here and it was bounded by dangerous walkways. Over the years, many drowned there.

Roughly at the same time as the brickmaking took off, pig keepers moved into the area. They had been evicted by their landlord from the Tottenham Court Road area and settled here. Many of those families lived together with the pigs in their houses.

As the area thus became a slum known as either The Potteries or The Piggeries. Conditions in Pottery Lane became so bad it became known as Cut Throat Lane.

On Sundays, there was cockfighting, bull-baiting and the killing of rats by dogs to amuse the residents.

...
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