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Featured · Queen’s Park ·
December
2
2023
The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.


In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Yiewsley
Yiewsley is a large suburban village in the London Borough of Hillingdon. Yiewsley’s transition from an agrarian community began when the Grand Junction Canal was opened. Construction started in May 1793 and connected the area to the Thames at Brentford, passing through Yiewsley on its way north following the River Colne. An aqueduct was built at Cowley Lock to cross the Fray’s River. In 1794, the canal opened between the Thames and Uxbridge, and in 1795, the aqueduct over the Fray’s River was likely completed.

The following year, in 1796, Colham Wharf, Yiewsley’s first dock, was established near Colham Bridge. In 1801, the Paddington Arm of the canal opened, connecting the area to national trade routes.

The canal played a vital role in transporting Cowley stock bricks, which were made from the abundant brick-earth in Yiewsley. The bricks were transported mainly along the Grand Junction Canal and the Regent’s Canal to supply the demand for building materials in Victorian London.

By t...

»more

NOVEMBER
1
2023

 

South Harrow
South Harrow originally spread south and west from the hamlet of Roxeth as a result of easier access from Central London by rail In the 1890s, the Metropolitan District Railway, which later became the District Line but was operating as an independent company at the time, recognised the inadequate service to Uxbridge and Harrow. To address this, they proposed the construction of a railway line towards both towns, and this led to the formation of the Ealing & South Harrow Railway. The railway line was intended to extend to South Harrow, which was then a rural area located to the south of Roxeth.

Construction of the railway line was completed by 1899, but the District Line faced financial difficulties that delayed its opening until 1903. Consequently, South Harrow became the terminus of a line extending from Park Royal & Twyford Abbey. The location around Northolt Road subsequently developed into South Harrow’s own commercial and residential hub.

The original station building was approximately 170 metres south of the present-day station. This extension marked a significant miles...
»more


SEPTEMBER
23
2023

 

Great Portland Street
Great Portland Street is a London Underground station near Regent’s Park Great Portland Street station was opened on 10 January 1863 as Portland Road, renamed Great Portland Street and Regents Park in 1923 and changed to its present name on 1 March 1917.

The station’s present structure, constructed in 1930, is situated on a traffic island at the intersection of Marylebone Road, Great Portland Street and Albany Street. This building features a steel-framed design with a cream terracotta exterior. The station’s perimeter also houses shops and, in the past, included a car showroom with office spaces above it. Notably, Great Portland Street was a significant sales location for the motor industry. The station’s architectural design, credited to C.W. Fowler, earned it a Grade II listing in January 1987.

The area around Great Portland Street station offers various points of interest. Regent’s Park and the iconic BT Tower are nearby attractions. Additionally, the station’s proximity to Regen...
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SEPTEMBER
20
2023

 

Courtfield Gardens, SW5
Courtfield Gardens is named after the field beneath it, cultivated until the 19th century According to 16th-century records, Courtfield Gardens was built on a vast open meadow known as Great Courtfield. This meadow was surrounded by fertile land and small farms and was part of a large area of land that extended from Cromwell Road to The Old Brompton Road in one direction, and from Gloucester Road to Earl’s Court Road in the other direction. Great Courtfield was included in the Earl’s Court ’manor’.

During the 18th century, Earl’s Court House, a grand manor house, was constructed on the land that is now the western terrace of Barkston Gardens. This building replaced an extensive dwelling that was described in 1705 as having fountains, a marble-tiled dairy, engines for water, and impressive gates at its entrance.

In the 19th century, the area surrounding Courtfield Gardens was developed with rows of terraced houses, as the demand for housing in London grew. Earl’s Court House was demolished in the middle of th...
»more


JUNE
16
2023

 

Alba Place, W11
Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area Originally the stable house accommodation for the main houses on Lancaster Road, the primary purpose of the Mews properties is now residential.

Alba Place is located on the site of an original Mews but has been redeveloped to a degree that it no longer contains any surviving Mews properties. It is a gated cul-de-sac off Portobello Road in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, almost opposite Hayden’s Place (another redeveloped Mews). It contains 16 properties used for residential purposes.

Alba Place was Albion Place until 1937, one of the many patriotic names dating from the period immediately following the Crimean War.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Eileen   
Added: 10 Nov 2023 09:42 GMT   

Brecknock Road Pleating Company
My great grandparents ran the Brecknock Road pleating Company around 1910 to 1920 and my Grandmother worked there as a pleater until she was 16. I should like to know more about this. I know they had a beautiful Victorian house in Islington as I have photos of it & of them in their garden.

Source: Family history

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2023 16:59 GMT   

061123
Why do Thames Water not collect the 15 . Three meter lengths of blue plastic fencing, and old pipes etc. They left here for the last TWO Years, these cause an obstruction,as they halfway lying in the road,as no footpath down this road, and the cars going and exiting the park are getting damaged, also the public are in Grave Danger when trying to avoid your rubbish and the danger of your fences.

Source: Squirrels Lane. Buckhurst Hill, Essex. IG9. I want some action ,now, not Excuses.MK.

Reply

Christian   
Added: 31 Oct 2023 10:34 GMT   

Cornwall Road, W11
Photo shows William Richard Hoare’s chemist shop at 121 Cornwall Road.

Reply

Vik   
Added: 30 Oct 2023 18:48 GMT   

Old pub sign from the Rising Sun
Hi I have no connection to the area except that for the last 30+ years we’ve had an old pub sign hanging on our kitchen wall from the Rising Sun, Stanwell, which I believe was / is on the Oaks Rd. Happy to upload a photo if anyone can tell me how or where to do that!

Reply
Comment
Phillip Martin   
Added: 16 Oct 2023 06:25 GMT   

16 Ashburnham Road
On 15 October 1874 George Frederick Martin was born in 16 Ashburnham Road Greenwich to George Henry Martin, a painter, and Mary Martin, formerly Southern.

Reply
Lived here
Christine Bithrey   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 15:20 GMT   

The Hollies (1860 - 1900)
I lived in Holly Park Estate from 1969 I was 8 years old when we moved in until I left to get married, my mother still lives there now 84. I am wondering if there was ever a cemetery within The Hollies? And if so where? Was it near to the Blythwood Road end or much nearer to the old Methodist Church which is still standing although rather old looking. We spent most of our childhood playing along the old dis-used railway that run directly along Blythwood Road and opposite Holly Park Estate - top end which is where we live/ed. We now walk my mothers dog there twice a day. An elderly gentleman once told me when I was a child that there used to be a cemetery but I am not sure if he was trying to scare us children! I only thought about this recently when walking past the old Methodist Church and seeing the flag stone in the side of the wall with the inscription of when it was built late 1880

If anyone has any answers please email me [email protected]

Reply
Comment
Chris hutchison   
Added: 15 Oct 2023 03:04 GMT   

35 broadhurst gardens.
35 Broadhurst gardens was owned by famous opera singer Mr Herman “Simmy”Simberg. He had transformed it into a film and recording complex.
There was a film and animation studio on the ground floor. The recording facilities were on the next two floors.
I arrived in London from Australia in 1966 and worked in the studio as the tea boy and trainee recording engineer from Christmas 1966 for one year. The facility was leased by an American advertising company called Moreno Films. Mr Simbergs company Vox Humana used the studio for their own projects as well. I worked for both of them. I was so lucky. The manager was another wonderful gentleman called Jack Price who went on to create numerous songs for many famous singers of the day and also assisted the careers of Bob Marley and Jimmy Cliff. “Simmy” let me live in the bedsit,upper right hand window. Jack was also busy with projects with The Troggs,Bill Wyman,Peter Frampton. We did some great sessions with Manfred Mann and Alan Price. The Cream did some demos but that was before my time. We did lots of voice over work. Warren Mitchell and Ronnie Corbett were favourites. I went back in 1978 and “Simmy “ had removed all of the studio and it was now his home. His lounge room was still our studio in my minds eye!!


Reply
Comment
Sue L   
Added: 13 Oct 2023 17:21 GMT   

Duffield Street, Battersea
I’ve been looking for ages for a photo of Duffield Street without any luck.
My mother and grandfather lived there during the war. It was the first property he was able to buy but sadly after only a few months they were bombed out. My mother told the story that one night they were aware of a train stopping above them in the embankment. It was full of soldiers who threw out cigarettes and sweets at about four in the morning. They were returning from Dunkirk though of course my mother had no idea at the time. I have heard the same story from a different source too.

Reply



Click here to explore another London street
We now have 628 completed street histories and 46872 partial histories

SEPTEMBER
27
2019

 

Eel Brook Common
Eel Brook Common is common land in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Eel Brook Common was previously manorial waste, enclosed by a 12-foot ditch and used for pasture. The name is probably derived from ’Hillbrook’, meaning a hill with a brook. Musgrave Crescent is situated on this hill and it is believed that this is artificial - possibly a Bronze Age mound.

Encroachments for building took place in the late 18th century. During the mid 19th century, the building of the District Railway further reduced the area. Public opposition prevented the Ecclesiastical Commissioners building on the land between Crondace Road and New Kings Road. Thereafter informal recreational use developed.

After 1883, the then amateur local football team, Fulham F.C., played their home games on the common. In 2009, Chelsea Football Club help create an astroturf pitch which can be used in the community.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2019

 

Deptford
Deptford is named after a ford of the River Ravensbourne. Deptford began as two small communities - one at the ford on the Ravensbourne with the other being a fishing village on the Thames (called West Greenwich).

During the reign of Henry VIII, it became home to Deptford Dockyard (the first of the Royal Dockyards) which lasted until the lat Victorian era. They were the main administrative centre of the Royal Navy. Deptford had a long royal connection and gave birth to the legend of Sir Walter Raleigh laying down his cape for Queen Elizabeth I. Captain James Cook’s third voyage aboard Resolution set out from here. Deptford became a major shipbuilding faciliry and attracted Peter the Great of Russia to arrive incognito to study shipbuilding.

The two Deptford communities grew together and flourished. The area declined as first the Royal Navy moved out, and then the commercial docks themselves declined until the last dock, Convoys Wharf, closed in 2000.

Opened in 1836, Deptford station is the olde...
»more


SEPTEMBER
24
2019

 

Cold Blow Lane, SE14
Cold Blow Lane was originally a lane leading to Cold Blow Farm. Cold Blow Farm was situated on the site of the Sanford Housing Cooperative and even after the Croydon Railway came in 1854 with its brick tunnel, most of this area of New Cross remained agricultural.

Earlier, another nineteenth century transport link, the Croydon Canal created the Coldblow Branch which terminated at the modern junction with Mercury Way.

By the turn of the twentieth century, an industrial area developed and the Coldblow Signal Works were built beside the former Gas Works.

Originally running north from the Old Kent Road, on the site of the former Millwall ground - The Den - Cold Blow Lane turns sharply east. The Old Den was the fifth football stadium occupied by Millwall F.C. since their formation on the Isle of Dogs in 1885 before moving to the New Den in May 1993. The ground opened in 1910 on the former industrial area and was the home of Millwall for 83 years.

Cold Blow Lane was split in two during the twen...
»more


SEPTEMBER
23
2019

 

Crabtree Farm
Crabtree Farm was Fulham’s last farm. It lay between Fulham Palace Road and Rannoch Road bounded on the north by Colwith Road and on the south by Crabtree Lane. The farmhouse used to exist at the junction of Larnach Road and Rannoch Road.

This area had been farmed since the early 19th century and was the property of the Matyear family. William Matyear, the last of the family to farm there was a bachelor who died in 1910.

It produced vegetables and strawberries for sale at Covent Garden Market. When in 1910 the farm was sold to Allen and Norris, local estate agents, they built several streets of houses upon it. Allen & Norris established their offices at the corner of Nella Road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2019

 

St Peter, Paul’s Wharf
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. First mentioned in the 12th Century It stood to the north of Upper Thames Street in Queenhithe Ward The parish was defiant in continuing to use the Book of Common Prayer during the Civil War.

St Peter’s was, along with most of the City’s other parish churches, destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. Fifty-one were chosen, but St Peter Paul’s Wharf was not among them. Following the fire the parish was united with that of St Benet Paul’s Wharf.

»read full article


SEPTEMBER
20
2019

 

South Mimms
South Mimms is a village in the Hertsmere district of Hertfordshire. It is a small settlement located near to the junction of the M25 motorway with the A1(M) motorway and is perhaps more widely known because of the service station at that junction which takes its name from the village, and for mountain biking routes in the area which start from the service station.

Before 1965’s creation of Greater London, it was part of Middlesex rather than Hertfordshire and, along with Potters Bar, was transferred to the latter county in that year.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
17
2019

 

No 1 Poultry, EC2R
No 1 Poultry is an office and retail building in London. It is located at the junction of Poultry and Queen Victoria Street, adjacent to Bank junction, in the City of London financial district. The building was designed by James Stirling for a site which then was owned by developer Peter Palumbo, and first assembled by Palumbo’s father, Rudolph, in the 1960s.

Originally intended to be the site of a modernist office tower designed by Mies van der Rohe in the manner of the Seagram Building in New York City, that scheme was aborted following one of the great architectural and planning show-downs of the 1970s.

A new design was created, Stirling’s final design, in a postmodernist style with an outer shell of bands of rose-pink stone. The structure was built after his death and is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of the postmodernist style in London.

In 2016, following proposals to alter it, it received government recognition with a listing at grade II*, making it the youngest listed building in England.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
16
2019

 

Air Street, SW1Y
Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658. ’Aire Street’ south of Regent Street followed the former boundary of Swallow Close and Round Rundles - it is a rather tiny street. The slightly longer northern section - north of Regent Street - formed a boundary of the Sherard estate and was originally Francis Street, named after Francis Sherard.

In 1676, there were already 23 houses in the street.

When the area was rebuilt, the two sections of Air Street leading north and south from Regent Street, each gained an archway.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
15
2019

 

St Matthew Friday Street
St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.

St. Matthew was the only church in the City of London dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street was so named, according to John Stow, after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records.

Cheapside was the principal market street of medieval London and many of the lesser streets running off were called after the commodity sold there, such as Milk Street, Bread Street and Wood Street. It is more likely, therefore, that Friday Street was so called from fishmongers vending, rather than living there.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
4
2019

 

Campden Hill, W8
Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington. The name of Campden Hill derives from a house called Campden House, built by Baptist Hicks whose country seat was in the Gloucestershire town of Chipping Campden.

The street called Campden Hill was built beside the grounds of the former Bute House, demolished in 1913.

Meanwhile the hill of this name lies in Holland Park, the former deer park of Holland House. The top of the hill was the site of water towers built in the 19th century by the Grand Junction and West Middlesex waterworks companies.

Writer GK Chesterton was born on Campden Hill.

1 Campden Hill dated from 1915 and built by Edmond Hills, President of the Royal Astronomical Society. A street named Observatory Gardens is situated nearby.

Holland Park School now lies to the north of the street.
»read full article


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