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The Underground Map

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Featured · Tower Gardens ·
MARCH
3
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Risley Avenue, N17
Risley Avenue is part of the Tower Gardens Estate. The Tower Gardens Estate has a very special place in the history of Council house building. It was one of the first ’garden suburbs’ in the world and its architecture is of extremely high quality.

At the turn of the twentieth century Tottenham was a suburb served by new railways and at the end of the tram lines. It was surrounded by fields which the newly formed London County Council (LCC ) could acquire using as-yet hardly-used powers to buy land and build housing.

Early experiments in housing design for workers had produced beautiful picturesque estates outside London modelled on traditional rural housing, such as Port Sunlight and Bourneville. They were designed by some of the most progressive architects of their day and funded by rich social reformers. Their architectural philosophy respected co-operation between architects and craftspeople and was called the ’Arts and Crafts Movement’.

The LCC wanted to improve housing conditi...

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FEBRUARY
13
2021

 

Crouch Hill
Crouch Hill is a railway station as well as a street in north London The area of Crouch Hill was still mostly farmland until Crouch Hill station opened in July 1868.

After the railway arrived, housebuilding started in earnest. Each of the road called Crouch Hill, John Farrer built Cecile Park in the 1880s and 1890s. To the west, W.J. Collins was at work at the same time.

Between the two world wars, Crouch Hill saw council housing appears. In 1972, the Holly Park estate’s 17-storey Ilex House was completed.

Crouch Hill crosses over the Parkland Walk, a public foot and cycle path and linear park that stretches from Finsbury Park to Alexandra Palace, and follows some of the course of the Northern Heights planned rail extension to the Northern line, abandoned on 9 February 1954.

Since January 2010, trains from Crouch Hill run every 15 minutes in each direction, towards either Gospel Oak or Barking throughout the day.
»read full article


FEBRUARY
12
2021

 

St Ann’s Villas, W11
St Ann’s Villas, a tree-lined if busy road, leads into Royal Crescent from St Ann’s Road The Norland estate had been 52 acres of ground, bounded on the east by the streets now known as Portland Road and Pottery Lane, on the south by Holland Park Avenue. By the mid 1830s, Norland was looking attractive for speculative building.

In 1836, the incorporation of the Birmingham, Bristol and Thames Junction Railway occurred. The company proposed the construction of a line from Willesden to the Kensington Canal. The route authorised was north-south a few yards outside the western boundary of the Norland estate, across the Uxbridge Road at Shepherd’s Bush.

Drainage problems posed by the construction of the railway promoted the development of the Norland Estate. Between the Uxbridge and Hammersmith roads the railway was to extend along or very close to the course of the Counter’s Creek sewer, the natural open ditch which discharged surface water into the Kensington Canal. In 1837–8 the Westminster Commissioners of Sewers insisted that the railway ...
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FEBRUARY
11
2021

 

Severus Road, SW11
Severus Road is almost opposite the main entrance to Clapham Junction station and runs down to Eckstein Road In 1885, the area which became Severus Road and other local streets consisted of meadowland and gardens. In that year and for the following four years, builder Alfred Heaver and architect C. J.Bentley went to work. Having paid £16 000 for the land, Heaver named the area St John’s Park and proceeded to build 225 houses on five streets.

Most of the land was acquired from the Whiting family. Also included was George Alder’s former house on St John’s Hill, which gave main-road access from the north. The area was bounded on the east by St John’s Road and to the south by Battersea Rise.

Alfred Heaver suggested names for the new roads: Markfield Road, Winton Road, Manbury Road and Danehurst Road. Boutflower Road already existed as a lane. The Metropolitan Board of Works rejected the new road names as ’unsuitable’ and suggested instead, rather exotically, Aliwal Road, Comyn Road, Eckstein Road and Severus Road. Boutflower Road, for the existing lane,...
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FEBRUARY
10
2021

 

Philharmonic Hall
The Philharmonic Hall was a major music hall throughout the 1860s and early 1870s The Philharmonic Hall was built by the contractors Holland and Hannen on the site of some former tenements. It opened with a banquet on 7 November 1860. The Hall was the first of many places of entertainment that would be built on this site, culminating in the Islington Empire of 1908.

The Hall was redecorated in 1874 and the building was also renamed the Philharmonic Theatre, with a seating capacity for some 758 people. Alas it was destroyed by fire in September 1882. The Grand Theatre opened on its site in August 1883.

Like its predecessor, the (first) Grand Theatre was destroyed by fire, this time only four years after being built, during the staging of the annual Christmas pantomime on 29 December 1887.

The owners, Holt and Wilmot, immediately set about rebuilding the Theatre with Frank Matcham again doing the redesign. The second Grand Theatre reopened a year later on 1 December 1888 with a production of ’The Still Alarm’.
...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

Reply
Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

Christine Clark   
Added: 20 Feb 2021 11:27 GMT   

Number 44 (1947 - 1967)
The Clark’s moved here from Dorking my father worked on the Thames as a captain of shell mex tankers,there were three children, CHristine, Barbara and Frank, my mother was Ida and my father Frank.Our house no 44 and 42 were pulled down and we were relocated to Bromley The rest of our family lived close by in Milton Court Rd, Brocklehurat Street, Chubworthy street so one big happy family..lovely days.

Reply

Linda    
Added: 18 Feb 2021 22:03 GMT   

Pereira Street, E1
My grandfather Charles Suett lived in Periera Street & married a widowed neighbour there. They later moved to 33 Bullen House, Collingwood Street where my father was born.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

Reply

   
Added: 16 Feb 2021 13:41 GMT   

Giraud Street
I lived in Giraud St in 1938/1939. I lived with my Mother May Lillian Allen & my brother James Allen (Known as Lenny) My name is Tom Allen and was evacuated to Surrey from Giraud St. I am now 90 years of age.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

Reply
SEPTEMBER
27
2019

 

Eel Brook Common
Eel Brook Common is common land in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Eel Brook Common was previously manorial waste, enclosed by a 12-foot ditch and used for pasture. The name is probably derived from ’Hillbrook’, meaning a hill with a brook. Musgrave Crescent is situated on this hill and it is believed that this is artificial - possibly a Bronze Age mound.

Encroachments for building took place in the late 18th century. During the mid 19th century, the building of the District Railway further reduced the area. Public opposition prevented the Ecclesiastical Commissioners building on the land between Crondace Road and New Kings Road. Thereafter informal recreational use developed.

After 1883, the then amateur local football team, Fulham F.C., played their home games on the common. In 2009, Chelsea Football Club help create an astroturf pitch which can be used in the community.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
26
2019

 

Deptford
Deptford is named after a ford of the River Ravensbourne. Deptford began as two small communities - one at the ford on the Ravensbourne with the other being a fishing village on the Thames (called West Greenwich).

During the reign of Henry VIII, it became home to Deptford Dockyard (the first of the Royal Dockyards) which lasted until the lat Victorian era. They were the main administrative centre of the Royal Navy. Deptford had a long royal connection and gave birth to the legend of Sir Walter Raleigh laying down his cape for Queen Elizabeth I. Captain James Cook’s third voyage aboard Resolution set out from here. Deptford became a major shipbuilding faciliry and attracted Peter the Great of Russia to arrive incognito to study shipbuilding.

The two Deptford communities grew together and flourished. The area declined as first the Royal Navy moved out, and then the commercial docks themselves declined until the last dock, Convoys Wharf, closed in 2000.

Opened in 1836, Deptford station is the olde...
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SEPTEMBER
25
2019

 

Knoyle Street, SE14
Knoyle Street is the eastern extension of Cold Blow Lane beyond the East London Railway. The line of Knoyle Street dates back to the early 1800s as simply a muddy footpath extending Cold Blow Lane.

The street has a confusing history of layouts. Originally it ran east-west but in the 1960s it was shortened and most of the street was newer, running in a quarter-circle north from the shortened section. Part of the Woodpecker Estate was built here.

When completed, the Woodpecker Estate consisted of eight tower blocks. In the centre of the estate was the main local shopping centre and a pub named The Spanish Steps. The estate became synonymous with gang culture in Lewisham and in 1992, an Estate Action Plan was drawn up for the regeneration of the estate. This resulted in all but one of its tower blocks being demolished and replaced with three storey blocks of flats.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
24
2019

 

Cold Blow Lane, SE14
Cold Blow Lane was originally a lane leading to Cold Blow Farm. Cold Blow Farm was situated on the site of the Sanford Housing Cooperative and even after the Croydon Railway came in 1854 with its brick tunnel, most of this area of New Cross remained agricultural.

Earlier, another nineteenth century transport link, the Croydon Canal created the Coldblow Branch which terminated at the modern junction with Mercury Way.

By the turn of the twentieth century, an industrial area developed and the Coldblow Signal Works were built beside the former Gas Works.

Originally running north from the Old Kent Road, on the site of the former Millwall ground - The Den - Cold Blow Lane turns sharply east. The Old Den was the fifth football stadium occupied by Millwall F.C. since their formation on the Isle of Dogs in 1885 before moving to the New Den in May 1993. The ground opened in 1910 on the former industrial area and was the home of Millwall for 83 years.

Cold Blow Lane was split in two during the twen...
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SEPTEMBER
23
2019

 

Crabtree Farm
Crabtree Farm was Fulham’s last farm. It lay between Fulham Palace Road and Rannoch Road bounded on the north by Colwith Road and on the south by Crabtree Lane. The farmhouse used to exist at the junction of Larnach Road and Rannoch Road.

This area had been farmed since the early 19th century and was the property of the Matyear family. William Matyear, the last of the family to farm there was a bachelor who died in 1910.

It produced vegetables and strawberries for sale at Covent Garden Market. When in 1910 the farm was sold to Allen and Norris, local estate agents, they built several streets of houses upon it. Allen & Norris established their offices at the corner of Nella Road.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
22
2019

 

Argyle Road, W13
Argyle Road came into existence in 1870. The road finally allowed a direct route to the north from West Ealing. Previously, the only route in this direction was Drayton Green Lane, which twisted and turned around the fields and the ancient hamlet of Drayton.

Argyle Road wasn’t fully laid out until the early 20th century.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
21
2019

 

St Peter, Paul’s Wharf
St Peter, Paul’s Wharf, was a parish church in the City of London. It was destroyed in the Great Fire of London in 1666. First mentioned in the 12th Century It stood to the north of Upper Thames Street in Queenhithe Ward The parish was defiant in continuing to use the Book of Common Prayer during the Civil War.

St Peter’s was, along with most of the City’s other parish churches, destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren to decide which would be rebuilt. Fifty-one were chosen, but St Peter Paul’s Wharf was not among them. Following the fire the parish was united with that of St Benet Paul’s Wharf.

»read full article


SEPTEMBER
20
2019

 

South Mimms
South Mimms is a village in the Hertsmere district of Hertfordshire. It is a small settlement located near to the junction of the M25 motorway with the A1(M) motorway and is perhaps more widely known because of the service station at that junction which takes its name from the village, and for mountain biking routes in the area which start from the service station.

Before 1965’s creation of Greater London, it was part of Middlesex rather than Hertfordshire and, along with Potters Bar, was transferred to the latter county in that year.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
19
2019

 

Frank Whipple Place, E14
East End campaigner Frank Whipple died in 2011 at the age of 103. Born in Ireland, Frank Whipple moved to east London with his family in 1916.

Having witnessed unrest on the streets in the garment business, where he was a shop steward, he became strongly political. He was involved in the 1926 General Strike, fought off fascists in Cable Street in the 1930s and worked as a policeman during the war.

After his wife Lily died in 1975, Frank dedicated his life to his disabled daughter Peggy at their home in Rhodeswell Road and lived to become the UK’s oldest registered carer.

In 2009, Tower Hamlets Council declared Mr Whipple a local hero and commissioned a set of photographs by Rankin.

A Millwall supporter since 1918, Mr Whipple had been the club’s oldest season ticket holder.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
18
2019

 

Westwood Road, E16
Westwood Road ran from Evelyn Road to North Woolwich Road. The Royal Victoria Dock opened in 1855, creating a need to house dock workers and their families. New settlements around the dock developed including the areas now known as West Silvertown. The casual nature of dock work meant poverty and squalid living conditions. Lacking water supply and sewage system, leading to the spread of cholera and smallpox.

The Royal Albert Dock was opened in 1880, and finally the King George V Dock in 1921.

On 19 January 1917, parts of Silvertown were devastated by a huge explosion at the Brunner-Mond munitions factory, killing 73 people. 900 local homes were flattened, and 60 000 buildings damaged

The artist Graham Sutherland visited Silvertown in 1941 and, in the aftermath of the Blitz saw “the shells of long terraces of houses, great ― surprisingly wide ― perspectives of destruction seeming to recede into infinity. The windowless blocks were like sightless eyes.”

After the devastation of...
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SEPTEMBER
17
2019

 

No 1 Poultry, EC2R
No 1 Poultry is an office and retail building in London. It is located at the junction of Poultry and Queen Victoria Street, adjacent to Bank junction, in the City of London financial district. The building was designed by James Stirling for a site which then was owned by developer Peter Palumbo, and first assembled by Palumbo’s father, Rudolph, in the 1960s.

Originally intended to be the site of a modernist office tower designed by Mies van der Rohe in the manner of the Seagram Building in New York City, that scheme was aborted following one of the great architectural and planning show-downs of the 1970s.

A new design was created, Stirling’s final design, in a postmodernist style with an outer shell of bands of rose-pink stone. The structure was built after his death and is considered one of the greatest masterpieces of the postmodernist style in London.

In 2016, following proposals to alter it, it received government recognition with a listing at grade II*, making it the youngest listed building in England.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
16
2019

 

Air Street, W1B
Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658. ’Aire Street’ south of Regent Street followed the former boundary of Swallow Close and Round Rundles. The northern section - north of Regent Street - formed the western boundary of the Sherard estate and was originally Francis Street, after Francis Sherard.

In 1676, there were 23 houses in the street.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
15
2019

 

St Matthew Friday Street
St. Matthew Friday Street was a church in the City of London located on Friday Street, off Cheapside. Recorded since the 13th century, the church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, then rebuilt by the office of Sir Christopher Wren. The rebuilt church was demolished in 1885.

St. Matthew was the only church in the City of London dedicated to the apostle and patron saint of accountants. Friday Street was so named, according to John Stow, after the fishmongers living there, although none are recorded in the parish records.

Cheapside was the principal market street of medieval London and many of the lesser streets running off were called after the commodity sold there, such as Milk Street, Bread Street and Wood Street. It is more likely, therefore, that Friday Street was so called from fishmongers vending, rather than living there.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
9
2019

 

Stoke Newington Church Street, N16
Stoke Newington Church Street links Green Lanes in the west to Stoke Newington High Street in the east. The road was noted as Newington Lane in 1403, then Church Street in 1576 and as Stoke Newington Church Street from 1937.

A number of notable properties flanked it: Newington Hall, Paradise House and Glebe Place amongst others.

Clissold Park is at one end of Church Street. Abney Park Cemetery which dates from 1840 has an entrance on the street. At the junction with Albion Road, was the municipal town hall and assembly hall of the former borough of Stoke Newington (refurbished in 2010). In Abney House, the Newington Academy for Girls of 1824 ran the world’s first school bus from Church Street to Gracechurch Street meeting house in the City, taking the pupils to Quaker worship.

In addition to many public houses and restaurants, the street is home to a wide range of independent shops.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
8
2019

 

Mapesbury Road, NW2
Mapesbury Road is named after Walter Map, prebendary from 1173–1192. Mapesbury was formerly the name for this whole area of Middlesex - Willesden Lane was known as Mapes Lane until the 1860s. It was countryside until the 1860s - after that residential development began and by 1875 there were a number of large suburban villas in the area.

Mapesbury Road laid out in 1894 over the lands of the former Mapesbury Farm and its was developed between 1895 and 1905. In 1982 Mapesbury Road became part of a conservation area.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
4
2019

 

Campden Hill, W8
Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington. The name of Campden Hill derives from a house called Campden House, built by Baptist Hicks whose country seat was in the Gloucestershire town of Chipping Campden.

The street called Campden Hill was built beside the grounds of the former Bute House, demolished in 1913.

Meanwhile the hill of this name lies in Holland Park, the former deer park of Holland House. The top of the hill was the site of water towers built in the 19th century by the Grand Junction and West Middlesex waterworks companies.

Writer GK Chesterton was born on Campden Hill.

1 Campden Hill dated from 1915 and built by Edmond Hills, President of the Royal Astronomical Society. A street named Observatory Gardens is situated nearby.

Holland Park School now lies to the north of the street.
»read full article


SEPTEMBER
3
2019

 

Blechynden Street, W10
Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10 The stump that remains belies its story as one of the main streets of the area.

Blechynden Street crossed a 50-acre estate that a barrister, James Whitchurch, purchased for £10 an acre in the early 19th century. He left his home in Blechynden in Southampton and built himself a house in Lancaster Road, North Kensington, now situated at No. 133.

Streets were built on the estate in 1846, and the first were named Aldermaston, Silchester, Bramley and Pamber after four neighbouring villages near Basingstoke, which was where James Whitchurch’s daughter Florence Blechynden Whitchurch was living.

After dividing the land into plots, he leased them to builders such as John Calverley, a Notting Hill builder who named a street after himself.

Other developers involved were Joseph Job Martin, the landlord of The Lancaster Tavern in Walmer Road, as well as the developer of Martin Street. Stephen Hurst, a builder from Kentish Town, was r...
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