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Featured · Holland Park ·
September
26
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Addison Avenue, W11
Addison Avenue runs north from Holland Park Avenue and was originally called Addison Road North. The street is named after the 17th century poet Joseph Addison who lived at Holland House. Addison was founder of The Spectator magazine.

The southern section of Addison Avenue (up to Queendale Road) was built between 1840 and 1843. Nos. 18-36 (even) are on the east side and overlook Queensdale Walk at the back. Nos. 17-35 (odd) are on the west side. They are generally two-storey houses with stuccoed façades built in pairs.

The houses were of various designs because individual plots were taken by many different builders.

Smaller houses were built closer to Holland Park Avenue.

»more

SEPTEMBER
3
2021

 

South Ealing
South Ealing is notable in Underground trivia for having, along with Mansion House, every vowel in its name South Ealing station was opened by the District Railway on 1 May 1883 on a new branch line from Acton to Hounslow. At that time there was no stop at Northfields and the next station on the new line was Boston Road (now Boston Manor).

Electrification of the District Railway’s tracks took place and electric trains replacing steam trains on the Hounslow branch from 13 June 1905.

The Northfields district then was just a muddy lane passing through market gardens. But housing began to be built at Northfields and in 1908, a small halt was built there.

Housing also began to appear to the north of South Ealing station - the area became rather commercial with new shops around the station.

The lines of the London Underground came under one ownership and, services from Ealing along the District Line into London having a lot of intermediate stops, it was decided to extend the Piccadilly Line parallel to the District tracks. Piccadilly...
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SEPTEMBER
2
2021

 

Boleyn Electric Theatre
The Boleyn Electric Theatre originally opened in 1910 The Boleyn Electric Theatre and the adjacent Boleyn pub were called Boleyn after a large house that had stood nearby and thought to be associated with Anne Boleyn.

Cinema architect Cecil Masey made alterations in 1929 - improvements were made to accommodate sound films and a canopy was installed over the entrance. In 1932 it was taken over by another owner and re-named the New Boleyn Electric Theatre.

In 1936 it was purchased by the Oscar Deutsch chain who decided to demolish the old Boleyn Cinema and rebuild and open as the Odeon Theatre on the same site. It was designed in an Art Deco style by cinema architect Andrew Mather and opened on 18 July 1938 with Max Miller in ’Thank Evans’. It continued as the Odeon East Ham until it was closed by the Rank Organisation in 1981.

After laying boarded up and unused for over a decade, it was taken over by an independent operator who re-opened it as the Boleyn Cinema in 1995 screening Bollywood f...
»more


SEPTEMBER
1
2021

 

Dukes Place, EC3A
Duke’s Place was formerly called Duke Street It a street running northwest-southeast as a continuation of Bevis Marks down to Aldgate. Originally known as Shoemaker Row, it had been renamed Duke Street by the end of the 18th century after the house of the Duke of Norfolk, which had been built by Sir T. Audley after he pulled down the priory of Holy Trinity, and which, coming to the Duke by marriage, was called Duke’s Place.

The area was an early settlement for Jews after they were permitted to enter Britain by Oliver Cromwell in 1657, resulting in the building of the Sephardic Bevis Marks Synagogue (1701) and the Ashkenazi Great Synagogue. The latter was established in 1620, subsequently rebuilt in 1766 and 1790 and was destroyed during an air-raid on 11th May 1942. The following year, a temporary structure was erected on the site and was used until 1958 when it moved to Adler Street, Whitechapel. The Adler Street synagogue closed in 1977.

Duke Street was renamed Duke’s Place in 1939 and has sin...
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AUGUST
31
2021

 

Ivybridge Lane, WC2N
Ivybridge Lane is named after a former ivy-covered bridge The ’ivy bridge’ crossed an old watercourse on this spot but the bridge itself was demolished sometime before 1600.

Ivybridge Lane was formerly called Salisbury Street.
»read full article





LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Born here
Ron Shepherd   
Added: 18 Sep 2021 17:28 GMT   

More Wisdom
Norman Joseph Wisdom was born in St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington, West London.

Reply
Comment
Jonathan Penner   
Added: 11 Sep 2021 16:03 GMT   

Pennard Road, W12
My wife and I, young Canadians, lodged at 65 (?) Pennard Road with a fellow named Clive and his girlfriend, Melanie, for about 6 months in 1985. We loved the area and found it extremely convenient.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 16:58 GMT   

Prefabs!
The "post-war detached houses" mentioned in the description were "prefabs" - self-contained single-storey pre-fabricated dwellings. Demolition of houses on the part that became Senegal Fields was complete by 1964 or 1965.

Source: Prefabs in the United Kingdom - Wikipedia

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Comment
Matthew Moggridge ([email protected])   
Added: 1 Sep 2021 10:38 GMT   

Lord Chatham’s Ride (does it even exist?)
Just to say that I cycled from my home in Sanderstead to Knockholt Pound at the weekend hoping to ride Lord Chatham’s Ride, but could I find it? No. I rode up Chevening Lane, just past the Three Horseshoes pub and when I reached the end of the road there was a gate and a sign reading "Private, No Entry". I assumed this was the back entrance to Chevening House, country retreat of the Foreign Secretary, and that Lord Chatham’s Ride was inside the grounds. At least that’s what I’m assuming as I ended up following a footpath that led me into some woods with loads of rooted pathways, all very annoying. Does Lord Chatham’s Ride exist and if so, can I ride it, or is it within the grounds of Chevening House and, therefore, out of bounds? Here’s an account of my weekend ride with images, see URL below.

Source: No Visible Lycra: Lord Chatham’s ride: a big disappointmen

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Comment
norma brown   
Added: 20 Aug 2021 21:12 GMT   

my grandparents lived there as well as 2 further generations
my home

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Comment
Ruth   
Added: 6 Aug 2021 13:31 GMT   

Cheltenham Road, SE15
Harris Girls’ Academy, in Homestall Road, just off Cheltenham Road, was formerly Waverley School. Before that it was built as Honor Oak Girls’ Grammar School. It was also the South London Emergency School during WW2,taking girls from various schools in the vicinity, including those returning from being evacuated.

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Comment
Jude Allen   
Added: 29 Jul 2021 07:53 GMT   

Bra top
I jave a jewelled item of clothong worn by a revie girl.
It is red with diamante straps. Inside it jas a label Bermans Revue 16 Orange Street but I cannot find any info online about the revue only that 16 Orange Street used to be a theatre. Does any one know about the revue. I would be intesrested to imagine the wearer of the article and her London life.

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

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OCTOBER
31
2019

 

Kentish Town West
Kentish Town West station opened on 1 April 1867 as ’Kentish Town’ and was renamed ’Kentish Town West’ on 2 June 1924. The station closed after a serious fire on 18 April 1971. It was rebuilt and reopened on 5 October 1981.

The station is now managed by London Overground, which also operates all services from the station.
»read full article


OCTOBER
17
2019

 

Akenside Road, NW3
Akenside Road is a street named after a famous local resident. Dr Mark Akenside (1721 – 1770) was an English poet and physician who lived and had his medical practise at North End, Hampstead.

Akenside was best known for his poem The Pleasures of Imagination, an eclectic philosophical essay that takes as its starting point papers on the same subject written by Joseph Addison for The Spectator.

Akenside Road followed the line of an old footpath.
»read full article


OCTOBER
16
2019

 

Victoria Coach Station
Victoria Coach Station is the largest coach station in London. It serves as a terminus for many medium- and long-distance coach services in the United Kingdom and is also the departure point for many countryside coach tours originating from London.

Victoria Coach Station was opened at its present site in Buckingham Palace Road in 1932, by London Coastal Coaches, a consortium of coach operators. The building is in a distinctive Art Deco style, the architects for which were Wallis, Gilbert and Partners. In 1970 the coach operators’ association which managed the station became a subsidiary of the National Bus Company.

In 1988, ownership of Victoria Coach Station Limited was transferred to London Transport. In 2000, Transport for London was formed and took over the station.

The freeholder of the site, Grosvenor Group, announced in 2013 that it wishes to redevelop the site and relocate the station elsewhere in London. However, the building was listed at Grade II by English Heritage in 2014.
»read full article


OCTOBER
15
2019

 

The Athenaeum Hotel
The Athenaeum is a family-owned five-star hotel overlooking Green Park. Hope House was built at 116 Piccadilly in 1849/50 by Henry Pelham-Clinton, the 6th Duke of Newcastle. The name Athenaeum first appears around 1864 when the house was bought by the Junior Athenaeum Club. The house was redeveloped in the 1930s as an art deco apartment block, still called the Athenaeum.

In 1971 the Rank Organisation purchased the 1930s Athenaeum Court apartment block, opening it as The Athenaeum Hotel after a two-year refurbishment.
»read full article


OCTOBER
13
2019

 

Watergate Street, SE8
Watergate Street is an old Deptford street giving access to the river. Watergate Street was formerly known as King Street.

Many large houses were built in the street during the 17th and 18th centuries and lived in by those connected to the maritime trade.

By the twentieth century the street had became a slum and post-war, new housing was built.
»read full article


OCTOBER
10
2019

 

Baden-Powell House
Baden-Powell House is a Scouting hostel and conference centre built as a tribute to Lord Baden-Powell, the founder of Scouting.. The building committee, chaired by Sir Harold Gillett, Lord Mayor of London, purchased the site in 1956, and assigned Ralph Tubbs to design the house in the modern architectural style. The foundation stone was laid in 1959 by World Chief Guide Olave, Lady Baden-Powell, and it was opened in 1961 by Queen Elizabeth II. The largest part of the £400,000 cost was provided by the Scout Movement itself. Over the years, the house has been refurbished several times, so that it now provides modern and affordable lodging for Scouts, Guides, their families and the general public staying in London. The building also hosts conference and event space for hire.

From 1974 to 2001, Baden-Powell House was the headquarters of The Scout Association, for which a dedicated extension to the house was completed in 1976. In April 2001, the headquarters formally moved to new accommodation at Gilwell Park. As the owner of Baden-Powell House, The Scout Association receives a net income out of the ...
»more


OCTOBER
8
2019

 

Wormholt Farm
Wormholt Farm existed until the First World War. The name ’Wormeholt’ is a term referring to snake-infested woodland in old English. The name was first used in 1189 after the woodland was cleared. The land became part of the Manor of Fulham and owned by the Bishops of London. The manor then descended to become Wormholt Barns.

For 200 years from 1548, Wormholt was leased to the Duke of Somerset. By the beginning of the seventeenth century, a family called Atley was running it but the poor quality of most of the land led to frequent changes of tenancy.

In the nineteenth century Wormholt Barns Manor was split between Eynham Farm and Wormholt Farm.

A survey of 1833 described the soil of Wormholt Farm as "strong loam, making good grazing fields near Uxbridge Road, but towards Wormholt Wood Scrubs it becomes too stiff and too wet in winter." These soil characteristics determined the eventual use of the land. The northern areas of the farm remained as arable and grazing almost to the end b...
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OCTOBER
4
2019

 

Warwick Avenue
Warwick Avenue is an area, street and a Bakerloo Line tube station near Little Venice. The area of which Warwick Avenue is part - Little Venice - is one of London’s prime residential areas, known for its shops and restaurants.

Warwick Avenue opened on 31 January 1915 on the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington to Queen’s Park. For a time prior to its opening, the proposed name for the station was Warrington Crescent. There are no surface buildings and the station is accessed by two sets of steps to a sub-surface ticket hall. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts.

Warwick Avenue is also the name of a song that makes reference to the station by the Welsh singer, Duffy.


»read full article


OCTOBER
3
2019

 

Middlesex Arms
On the north side of Bignall’s Corner was the Middlesex Arms. Bignalls Corner - now the site of South Mimms services - existed before the M25/A1(M) junction obliterated the scene.

On the junction was the Middlesex Arms. The pub had been built as a road house in 1931 but was demolished in 1973 to make way for the A1(M). Run by landlords Gordon and Hilda, there was lorry drivers’ overnight accommodation next to it. Drivers used to sleep in bunks four to a room.

The motel of the other side of the junction was a well known haunt for ‘ladies of the night’ who earned a living from the passing lorry drivers.

Further north up the A1 was the Budgie transport cafe, immortalised in the TV series of the same name. Also beside the A1 was the eventually abandoned and derelict ’San Marino’ which had a swimming pool in the back.
»read full article


OCTOBER
2
2019

 

Green Dragon Lane, N21
Green Dragon Lane, an old thoroughfare, started to be urbanised in 1907. The ’Green Dragon’ inn is reputed to have opened in 1726 on the junction of Green Lanes and Green Dragon Lane, with the latter road named after it. That pub moved to its current location at the bottom of Vicars Moor Lane near the end of the eighteenth century. In 2017, a micropub called the Little Green Dragon was opened near to the site of the original eighteenth century Green Dragon at the end of Green Dragon Lane.

In 1754 the Lane was called Filcaps Lane after Filcaps Farm which stood on its north side. Cary’s Map of Middlesex from 1789 shows it as Chace Lane, and the Edmonton Enclosure Award of 1801 calls it Old Park Road since it formed the southern boundary of Old Park. Henrietta Cresswell in 1912 called it Dog Kennel Lane - a document of 1721 refers to the cutting down of an oak tree near the dog kennel on the Chase.

A builder Richard Metherell arrived in London from Devon to London in the 1870s. He formed a company - R. Metherell and Son -...
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OCTOBER
1
2019

 

Old Park View, EN2
Old Park View was the home of the Beatles’ "Mean Mr. Mustard" Enfield Old Park was located in what is now Enfield and mentioned in the Domesday Book as being held by Geoffrey de Mandeville. Much of the Park is now built over as the suburb of Grange Park.

The Old Park was located around the site of an Iron Age hill fort. It was possibly a hunting park before the time of the Domesday Book and lasted as such until the 18th century.

From the 15th century and until the Civil War, the Old Park became royal property as part of the Duchy of Lancaster. Queen Elizabeth I often visited Enfield staying in a house at the border of the park.

In the early 17th century, the New River was laid through part of the Park.

In 1777, all of Enfield Chase was inclosed and came under several owners, including the then owner of the Park, Samuel Clayton. New roads such as Green Dragon Lane were laid out and the area became agricultural. In 1893 and 1895, Enfield Golf Club and Bush Hill Golf Club undertook long le...
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