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Dollis Hill ·
August
14
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Dollis Hill Lane, NW2
Dollis Hill Lane is an ancient throughway. At the time of the Enclosure Award of 1816, the area of a 16th century farm at Oxgate, another farm at the top of Dollis Hill, a mansion known as Neasden House and some 75 fields resulting from the enclosure. The region was typical open farming country and the only road across the area was Dollis Hill Lane which traversed it from east to west. Dollis Hill House was built in 1825 and the railway in 1868. By 1895 there was a golf-course to the south west.

Residential building really started in the south-east of Dollis Hill from 1907-08.

Of the major landmarks constructed in the first quarter of the century, the two most noteworthy are St. Andrew’s Hospital, built in 1913, and the Post Office Research Station which rose in 1923 on the site of the old Dollis Hill Farm. In the mid-1920s Edgware Road was developed and there was some small-scale building in the middle of Dollis Hill.

So far a large part of the area still retained much of its rur...

»more

AUGUST
11
2020

 

Braddyll Street, SE10
Braddyll Street dates from 1852 Many street names east of Greenwich relate to the Durham coal field. Col. Braddyll was one of the partners in the South Hetton Coal Company. Messrs Braddyll & Co. also then owned Dalden-le-Dale Colliery.

The locomotive ’Bradyll’ still exists and is believed to be the oldest surviving locomotive with six-driving wheels. Bradyll was built by Timothy Hackworth at his Soho Works in Shildon, County Durham in 1840. The locomotive can be seen in the National Railway Museum’s location at Shildon.

The street was labelled ’Braddyle Street’ on the Stanford 1860s map and its alignment followed the modern Thornley Place before it was later extended south.
»read full article


AUGUST
10
2020

 

Lea Bridge
Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the ...
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AUGUST
4
2020

 

Beaumont Street, W1G
Beaumont Street is the location of the King Edward VII Hospital and the Marylebone Library Beaumont Street runs from Marylebone High Street to the junction of Westmoreland Street and Weymouth Street. It was named after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century.

The street’s story began soon after the Marylebone Gardens closed in 1776, the line of the northern half being mostly laid out over the site of the gardens. The southern part was already partly developed by then.

Building leases were granted to the Thomas Neales, senior and junior, and John White, among others in the late 1780s. The street was advertised as being in as "pleasant and as healthy a situation as in the country".

Shopkeepers and professionals moved in including a lady perfumer, surgeon, cheesemonger and a bookseller-stationer. Additionally there was a teacher of writing and accounting whose manuscript collection was open to the public.

The first residents in the 1790s included a botanical painter and a celebrated harpist, ...
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JULY
23
2020

 

Thorold Road, IG1
Thorold Road dates from 1889-90 The name Thorold Road might reflect a Lincolnshire association since, while not a village name, there are two pubs called ’The Thorold Arms’ - one in Marston and the other in Harmston. The Reverend Henry Thorold lived in a vicarage in the former. A housemaster at Lancing College, he wrote for the acclaimed ’Shell Guides’ to the counties of England.

More likely is the theory that the name is derived from James Edwin Thorold Rogers (1823-1890) who was Liberal MP for Southwark. He had been influential in the ’National Liberal Land Company’. The company was renamed the ’National Land Company’ in 1893.

While not landowners in Ilford, the Balfour Group and the National (Liberal) Land Company had close political links and it was the Balfour Group - trading locally as Hobbs and Company - which developed Thorold Street.

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JANUARY
31
2020

 

Grosvenor Buildings, E14
Grosvenor Buildings were a late nineteenth century development. Grosvenor Buildings replaced back-to-back slums in 1885.

Two-hundred old and insanitary buildings - including a farmhouse on Robin Hood Lane - were demolished by the Metropolitan Board of Works to make way for the 500 flats, which had one to four rooms. Each flat was fitted with an inside toilet and piped running water.

In 1964 the Robin Hood Gardens housing estate was built on this site.
»read full article


JANUARY
30
2020

 

Poplar Baths
Poplar Baths is a former public bath house dating from 1933. The original Poplar Baths opened in 1852, being built to provide public wash facilities as a result of the Baths and Washhouses Act 1846. A public laundry was located at the rear of the building on Arthur Street.

The Baths were rebuilt in 1933 to a design by Harley Heckford and the larger pool was covered over to convert the building into a theatre. Called the East India Hall, it had seating capacity for 1400 people and incorporated a dance hall, cinema, exhibition room and sports hall for boxing and wrestling programmes.

The main bath hall sustained bomb damage during the Second World War and was forced to close. The baths reopened in 1947 and continued to be used as a swimming facility, before the facility’s eventual closure and conversion to an industrial training centre in 1988.

A campaign to restore the baths won the support of Tower Hamlets Council in 2010 and works created a new leisure centre incorporating a swimming pool, gymnas...
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JANUARY
29
2020

 

St Olave Hart Street
St Olave’s Church is a Church of England church located on the corner of Hart Street and Seething Lane. The church is one of only a handful of medieval City churches that escaped the Great Fire of London in 1666.

The church is first recorded in the 13th century as ’St Olave-towards-the-Tower’, dedicated to the patron saint of Norway, King Olaf II. Olaf fought alongside the Anglo-Saxon King Ethelred the Unready against the Danes in the Battle of London Bridge in 1014. St Olave’s was methodologically built on the site of the battle. The Norwegian connection was reinforced during the Second World War when King Haakon VII worshipped there while in exile.

Saint Olave’s was rebuilt in the 13th century and then again in the 15th century. The present building dates from around 1450.

Saint Olave’s survived the Great Fire of London with the help of Sir William Penn, the father of the William Penn who founded Pennsylvania, and men from the nearby Naval yards. He had ordered the men to blow up the houses surrounding the church to create a fire ...
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JANUARY
28
2020

 

Byward Street, EC3R
Byward Street was laid out between 1895 and 1906. Byward Street was built because of the construction of the District Line underneath required the demolition of the older Black Swan Court which itself had been built the successor to a Roman thoroughfare.

It provided access to the Crown Gate of the Byward Tower.

A number of retail outlets and restaurants now line Byward Street.
»read full article


JANUARY
27
2020

 

Steen Way, SE22
Steen Way is named after the 17th century artist, Jan Steen. Steen Way is in fitting with the other ’Dutch’ names though Jan Steen (whose surname in Dutch is actually pronounced like ’stain’) has little connection with Dulwich’s twin town of Deventer.

Jan Steen was born in Leiden in 1626, a town where his well-to-do, Catholic family were brewers who ran a tavern for two generations. Steen’s father even leased him a brewery of his own in Delft from the years 1654 until 1657. Like his even more famous contemporary Rembrandt van Rijn, Jan Steen attended the Latin school and became a student in Leiden. He received his artistic education from Nicolaes Knupfer (1603–1660), a German painter living in Utrecht.

In 1648 he moved to The Hague. Steen painted ’A Burgomaster of Delft and his daughter’.

Steen lived in Warmond, just north of Leiden, from 1656 till 1660 and in Haarlem from 1660 till 1670 and in both periods he was especially productive. In 1670, after the death of his wife, Steen m...
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JANUARY
26
2020

 

Bartlett’s Buildings, EC1N
Bartlett’s Buildings was the name of a street situated off of Holborn Circus The street, also known as Bartlett’s Court, was recorded by 1615 as a street where lawyers had offices. An alley called Bartlett’s Passage ran from the west side of Bartlett’s Buildings to Fetter Lane.

Jane Austen’s ’Sense and Sensibility’ (1811) mentioned the street as the lodgings for the two Miss Steeles lodge when visiting their cousin.

The street was totally destroyed during a Second World War air raid in 1941.

New Fetter Lane was built post war in its place.


»read full article


JANUARY
25
2020

 

Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y
The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London. It was built in an area devastated by bombing during the Second World War. Only around 500 residents remained in the City by 1950.

The site had been occupied since the mid 19th century by small Victorian industries and businesses, especially metal working.

As part of the comprehensive rebuilding strategy of the City of London, the idea was the provisional of general-needs council housing for the many people who worked in the City. The Estate, when built, fell within the boundary of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury, and so many tenancies were also offered to those on the Finsbury waiting list.

A competition for designs was announced in 1951 and was covered in the architectural and popular press. Geoffry Powell won the competition to build the estate in 1952. The three partners-to-be of Chamberlin, Powell and Bon were all lecturers in architecture at Kingston School of Art, and had entered into an agreement that if any of them won the ...
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JANUARY
24
2020

 

Attleborough Court, SE23
Attleborough Court is one of three blocks of flats on the Sydenham Hill Estate. Each block was named after particular Abbots of Bermondsey Abbey, lord of the manor of Dulwich between 1127 and 1538. Attleborough Court was named after John Attleborough, Bromleigh Court after John Bromleigh and Dunton Court after Richard Dunton.
»read full article


JANUARY
23
2020

 

Plumstead
The eastern end of the site of the former Royal Arsenal forms Plumstead’s northern boundary. It means ’place where the plum trees grew’ and was first recorded around 970 as ’Plumstede’.

For most of its history, the village was of little consequence.

Plumstead station opened in 1859. The Herbert estate was laid out north of Shooters Hill. To the south of the railway, Burrage Road was laid out and the first terraces of ’Burrage Town’ were built on Sandy Hill Road.

Plumstead expanded rapidly in the 1880s with housing developed for Arsenal workers, two-up two-down terraced housing was common in the area close to the river.

The downsizing of Woolwich Arsenal after the First World War brought a decline to Plumstead.

After the Second World War council projects transformed the western side of Plumstead. The largest of these was the Glyndon estate, with almost 2,000 dwellings, which was begun in 1959 and completed in 1981.
»read full article


JANUARY
22
2020

 

Campden Street, W8
Campden Street stretches between Campden Hill Road and Kensington Church Street. Campden Street was built by William Ward on land jointly bought with John Punter in 1822. Ward constructed houses here in a relatively relaxed way over the next 30 years. In about 1850 he sub-contracted the work of building the remaining houses to Henry Gilbert, who was both a builder and a pub owner, and to William Wheeler, a local builder. Ward died shortly afterwards.

The street is on a slight slope. The north side, at the western end, has a uniform terrace of three-storey houses stuccoed up to first floor which abut immediately onto the road. The eastern section of the north side has more varied architecture, mainly houses with attractive ground floor bay windows in differing styles.

The houses on the south side of the street are slightly smaller, mainly brick, with stucco up to the first floor. On the same side is Byam Shaw House, a particularly attractive and unusual block of flats.

The eastern section of the street has some small spe...
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JANUARY
21
2020

 

Amen Corner, EC4M
Originally called Amen Lane, this short path forms the approach road to Amen Court. John Stow records it as ’a short lane which runneth west some short distance, and is there closed up with a gate into a great house’. This great house was he College of Physicians. Founded in 1518 by Thomas Linacre, the College moved from his own house in Knightrider Street to the site of Amen Corner in about 1540.
»read full article


JANUARY
20
2020

 

Gun Street, E1
Gun Street was part of the Old Artillery Ground - land formerly designated one of the Liberties of the Tower of London. It was converted to an artillery ground in 1538 for the use of ’The Fraternity or Guild of Artillery of Longbows, Crossbows and Handguns’. This group were later known as the Honourable Artillery Company and used the ground in conjunction with the Gunners of the Tower.

In 1658 the Honourable Artillery Company moved to a new ground at Bunhill Fields, leaving the Gunners of the Tower in possession of the area until 1682, when it was sold off to speculative builders. These latter developed the area for housing, designating the streets with their present names of Fort Street, Gun Street, Artillery Passage and Artillery Lane.
»read full article


JANUARY
19
2020

 

Aldermans Walk, EC2M
Alderman’s Walk was formerly Dashwood’s Walk, for Francis Dashwood, who lived here in the 18th century. It has been a busy section of the City for centuries; carts and trucks have been rumbling around here ever since the Romans built the Bishops Gate and opened up a main thoroughfare into the City. Despite all this turmoil Frances Dashwood, an 18th century Member of the Common Council of the City, liked it so much that he built his house here, on the south side of the Walk near to Old Broad Street. When Dashwood received a Knighthood the place became known as Dashwood’s Court until he was elected to the Court of Aldermen of the City of London and from that time the name changed to Alderman’s Walk.

Adjoining the Walk, on the south side, is the church of St Botolph, Bishopsgate, one of three surviving churches dedicated to the seventh century patron saint of travellers. The first church on this site was built about the beginning of the 13th century and was probably twice replaced before the 17th century. On Tuesday 4 September 1666 St Botolph’s was shaking in its foun...
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JANUARY
18
2020

 

Anchor Yard, EC1V
Anchor Yard is named after a former inn here of this name. During they 18th century the popular Anchor Tavern graced this part of Old Street. In those days the Yard was much larger than it is today, probably with an opening wide enough to accept a dray cart. Here would have stood the empty wooden hogsheads awaiting collection on delivery day, and on summery evenings there would very likely have been multitudes swilling jugs of ale while looking on at a friendly skittle or bowling match.

For nigh on 200 years the Yard has been without its tavern; the Anchor was demolished at the beginning of the 19th century.
»read full article


JANUARY
17
2020

 

Russia Lane, E2
Russia Lane was formerly called Rushy Lane. By 1703, a cottage was mentioned as being found on the lane.

The cottage may have originated as a wastehold property and was in existence by 1648. By 1741 it was an inn - the Blue Anchor - which gave an alternative name to the lane.
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JANUARY
16
2020

 

Wollstonecraft Street, N1C
Wollstonecraft Street was the first name to be chosen from a naming competition by the developers of N1C. Mary Wollstonecraft was a nineteenth century writer, philosopher and advocate for women’s rights. She wrote ’A Vindication of the Rights of Woman’. She is buried in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church.
»read full article


JANUARY
15
2020

 

Bonner Street, E2
Bonner Street was named for Edmund Bonner, Bishop of London from 1539–49 and again from 1553-59. Bonner Street was once split into Bonner Street as its southernmost part and Bonner Lane in the north.

The area east of Bethnal Green was rural but Bishop’s Hall existed, occupied by Bishop Bonner. In 1655, the local manor house was demolished and the material used to build four new houses in the area. By 1741, the four houses were described as joining the main building on the west. The most easterly house, next to the lane, was a public house - probably the Three Golden Lions.

Other houses were built in Bonner Street by 1800 and spread eastward during the next decade.


»read full article


JANUARY
14
2020

 

Aldenham Street, NW1
Aldenham Street – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, gave land for the endowment of Aldenham School, Hertfordshire. Richard Platt was a native of Aldenham and like many gentlemen of his time, he saw the importance of the new styles of learning then spreading from the continent.

The area had been acquired as pasture land in 1575, and Platt gave the land to the Brewers’ Company in trust for Aldenham School.

Platt was concerned at the state of education in England after the church schools had largely been dissolved by Henry VIII. It was becoming the philanthropic custom for wealthy merchants to give free Grammar Schools in their home towns with London estates of land.

Platt bequeathed three local fields near St Pancras church and, in reverse, some land at Aldenham, including Medburn Farm, to be controlled for the school by the Brewers’ Company.

In 1811 the Brewers’Company obtained an Act of Parliament for ’improving the estate’. Building development began at the southern end on each side of Brewer Street (now Midland Road) and as ...
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JANUARY
13
2020

 

Bonnington Square, SW8
Bonnington Square was built in the 1870s to house railway workers. Bonnington Square should have been a traditional London square with houses facing a central communal garden. However, the original developers decided to build over what would have been the garden. The sqaure is not a through route and thus has a quiet and intimate character.

The Italian Gothic style terraced houses were built in of 1881.

During the 1960s, the by the run down properties were let at peppercorn rents to groups collectively known as the Bonnington Housing Cooperative. In the early 1990s the Bonnington Square Garden Association began planting street trees, vines and creating small community gardens in the surrounding area which have since matured to great effect.

In the late 1970s, Bonnington Square was compulsorily purchased by the Greater London Council on behalf of the Inner London Education Authority (ILEA), which intended to demolish it in order to build a new school.

In the late 1970s, Bonnington Square was...
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JANUARY
12
2020

 

Tiller Road, E14
Tiller Road was part of Glengall Grove before 1963. Glengall Road ran from Westferry Road to Manchester Road, crossing the Millwall Docks.

Shortly prior to the Second World War, it was renamed Glengall Grove. When road access through Millwall Docks was stopped in 1963, the western half of the road was renamed Tiller Road.

A tiller, in the nautical sense, is the lever attached to the rudder and used for steering.

Alexander House, a block of flats on the road, was built in the late 1920s. It was named after Frederick William Alexander OBE (1859-1937), Medical Officer of Health for Poplar and Bromley between 1893 and 1926.
»read full article


JANUARY
11
2020

 

Askew Road, W12
Askew Road is named after a local landowning family, the Askews, who also owned substantial land in Gloucestershire. At the turn of the nineteenth century, the local area was farmland - mainly orchards and market gardens which supplied fresh produce to the city of London. There was a track — Gaggle Goose Green — connecting two main routes into London, the Uxbridge Road and Goldhawk Road. The area halfway along the track was known as Starch Green.

As urbanisation continued, a growing demand for building materials encouraged many farmers to turn to brickmaking since the clay hereabouts was of good quality. The process created many lakes and ponds. Between 1870 and 1890 over 17 million bricks were produced with the 50 acre Stamford Brook brickfield employing 250 people.

In the latter half of the century, new tram and train services made the area attractive to clerks and other City workers and affordable housing started to cover the fields. Askew Road became a commercial centre at this time with a particular specialisation in laundries.

During the Second ...
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JANUARY
11
2020

 

Plaistow
Plaistow is a district in the London Borough of Newham and forms the majority of the London E13 postcode district. Plaistow Road is a former Roman road.

Plaistow, as a name, is believed to come from Sir Hugh de Plaitz who, in 1065, married Philippa de Montfitchet, whose family owned the district. She is reputed to have named it the Manor of Plaiz. A stow was a place of assembly.

Daniel Defoe’s 1724 work, ’Tour of the Eastern Counties’ mentions Plaistow as a town in which there had been much new building as well as repairs to existing houses.

The London, Tilbury and Southend Railway line from Bow to Barking was constructed through the middle of the Parish of West Ham in 1858. The new line opened with stations at Bromley, Plaistow and East Ham.

James Thorne, in his 1876 ’Handbook to the Environs of London’ recounts the changes to the village of Plaistow, with the gentry and merchants having gone and the occupations of the residents changed from agricultural and pastoral to manufacturing.

In 1886...
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JANUARY
10
2020

 

Abbey Road, E15
Abbey Road has a name derived from the Cistercian abbey of Stratford Langthorne. The abbey was founded about the year 1135 by Walter de Montfichet. It was a ’daughter house’ of the monastery of Savigney, France. The Cistercian Monks here were known as the ’white monks’ due to their white habits. The pathway which is now Abbey Road may even predate the abbey - it became a route from the church in West Ham Church to the abbey.

The abbey had a particular responsibility for the upkeep of the nearby bridge over the River Lea.

Sir Hubert Llewellyn Smith wrote a history of East London in 1939 and discussed the nursery rhyme ’London Bridge Is Falling Down’. The verses in the rhyme about repairing the bridge with bread, iron, gold and silver applied to the Lea bridge nearby he proposed as the monks used these very items in their time.

Henry VIII dissolved the abbey and the duty to drain the marsh was passed to the new owners of the lands that once belonged to the abbey.

Abbey Road (by then Abbey Lane)...
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JANUARY
9
2020

 

The Railway Tavern
The Railway Tavern was generally known as Charlie Brown’s. The pub lay beside a railway bridge on the corner of Garford Street and close to the gates of the West India Dock.

It was built around 1840 and was greatly extended in 1919.

Charlie Brown, the landlord between 1893 until 1932, hosted in his pub a museum of curiosities gathered from all over the world, brought by seaman sailing to and from the docks. The majority of items in the collection were from the Far East and Pacific. Charlie Brown would pay for any interesting items not already in his collection.

Charlie was a flamboyant character who, alongside being a publican, kept a stable of horses and would ride along the West and East India Dock Roads in riding gear.

Charlie died in 1932 at the age of 72 and his funeral was a renowned East End occasion.

On his death, Charlie Brown’s daughter Ethel took over the Railway Tavern until 1936.

His son - also called Charlie Brown - took over the Blue P...
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JANUARY
8
2020

 

Hog Lane, WC2H
Hog Lane was a lane that went from St Giles’ leper hospital (set up in the 12th century) to the monument to Eleanor at Charing Cross. Also known as Crown Street, like many London streets, Hog Lane became a busy thoroughfare. The name possible derived from the location of a pound at St. Giles, where animals were held as they were driven into London, as a stop before the final journey to the City markets. The road dates from around 1675.

Hog Lane was to eventually form the foundations the part of what we now know as Charing Cross Road north of Cambridge Circus.
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JANUARY
7
2020

 

Tower of London
The Tower of London is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames and lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets. The Tower of London was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078

As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains, despite later activity on the site.
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JANUARY
6
2020

 

Romford
Romford is the administrative centre of the London Borough of Havering and one of the major metropolitan centres identified in the London Plan. Romford was originally a market town in Essex. The town developed on the main road to London with Romford Market was established in 1247.

The railway station open in 1839 which was key to the development of the Star Brewery. The Eastern Counties Railway services operated between Mile End and Romford, with extensions to Brentwood and to Shoreditch in 1840. A second station was opened in 1892 by the London, Tilbury and Southend Railway, giving Romford a rail connection to Tilbury Docks. The two stations were combined in 1934.

There was a shift from agriculture to light industry during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and then to retail and commerce.

In the 20th century, Romford significantly expanded, becoming a municipal borough in 1937 and part of Greater London since 1965 when the area was transferred from Essex.


»read full article


JANUARY
5
2020

 

Frith Street, W1D
Frith Street is named after Richard Frith, a local builder. Frith Street was laid out in the late 1670s but is marked on Rocque’s map mistakenly as "Thrift Street".

After the late 18th century, the street became the home to many artistic and literary people including the artist John Constable, painter John Alexander Gresse, politician John Horne Tooke and John Bell, the sculptor. William Hazlitt wrote his last essays while he was lodging at no. 6.

A young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart stayed at no. 20 with his father and sister in 1764–65. From 1924 to 1926 John Logie Baird lived at no. 22 where in 1926 he demonstrated television to members of the Royal Institution.

Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club moved to 47 Frith Street.

In 1989, the Frith Street Gallery was founded here though in 2007 the gallery moved to Golden Square.
»read full article


JANUARY
4
2020

 

Grahame Park
Grahame Park was built on the site of the old Hendon Aerodrome. The estate is named in honour of Claude Grahame-White, the aviation pioneer who established the Hendon Aerodrome and aviation school on the site. Most roads, blocks and walkways have names linked to the aviation history of the site.

The building of the estate was a joint project between the Greater London Council and Barnet Council. The estate was designed in a ’Brutalist. style and the first residents moved in during October 1971. Barnet Council is refurbishing much of the estate with a 2032 completion date.

The Royal Air Force Museum is situated immediately to the south-east of the estate.
»read full article


JANUARY
3
2020

 

Maudsley Hospital
The Maudsley Hospital is a psychiatric hospital in the Denmark Hill area. In 1907, a leading psychiatrist, Henry Maudsley, offered London County Council £30,000 to help found a new mental hospital that would be exclusively for early/acute cases rather than chronic cases. It was to have an out-patients’ clinic and provide for teaching and research.

The Council agreed to contribute half the building costs and then covered the running costs which were almost twice as high per bed as the large asylums.

Construction of the hospital was completed in 1915. Before it could open, the building was requisitioned to treat war veterans.

After the war it was returned to the control of London County Council and it finally opened as the Maudsley Hospital in February 1923.

The Maudsley is now the largest mental health training institution in the UK.
»read full article


JANUARY
2
2020

 

Denmark Hill
Denmark Hill is an area named after a street (and hill) in Camberwell. Nearby streets whose names refer to different aspects of the same topographical feature include Dog Kennel Hill, Champion Hill and Red Post Hill. It marks the edge of the Thames valley plain in this area — from here to the river the land is flat.

The original name for the summit was Dulwich Hill. The name of the area was changed to Denmark Hill in honour of the husband of Queen Anne, Prince George of Denmark, who lived there.

The area is home of the Maudsley Hospital and King’s College Hospital, and also of Ruskin Park, named after John Ruskin, who once lived nearby. The preface to Ruskin’s ’Unto This Last’ is dated ’Denmark Hill, 10th May, 1862’.

The Salvation Army’s William Booth Memorial Training College on Champion Park which was designed by Giles Gilbert Scott was completed in 1932; it towers over South London. It has a similar monumental impressiveness to Gilbert Scott’s other...
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JANUARY
1
2020

 

Vine Hill, EC1R
Vine Hill now displays no evidence on the vines that once flourished in the grounds on which it stands. Vine Hill is a cul-de-sac with a steep flight of steps leads up to busy Rosebery Avenue.

Nearly 500 years ago, the gardens of the Bishops of Ely covered the land between here and their town house east of Hatton Garden.

In the late 16th century, Sir Christopher Hatton - with the help of Queen Elizabeth - had seized most of the estate. The estate then passed down through three generations to Baron Hatton of Kirby in 1640. Financial difficulties caused him to dispose of it and by 1660 Hatton Garden and a series of smaller roads had replaced both house and grounds.

The Hatton vineyard was swept away in about 1710 when this area was developed.
»read full article


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1900 and 1950 mapping is reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) licence.