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Dollis Hill ·
August
14
2020

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Dollis Hill Lane, NW2
Dollis Hill Lane is an ancient throughway. At the time of the Enclosure Award of 1816, the area of a 16th century farm at Oxgate, another farm at the top of Dollis Hill, a mansion known as Neasden House and some 75 fields resulting from the enclosure. The region was typical open farming country and the only road across the area was Dollis Hill Lane which traversed it from east to west. Dollis Hill House was built in 1825 and the railway in 1868. By 1895 there was a golf-course to the south west.

Residential building really started in the south-east of Dollis Hill from 1907-08.

Of the major landmarks constructed in the first quarter of the century, the two most noteworthy are St. Andrew’s Hospital, built in 1913, and the Post Office Research Station which rose in 1923 on the site of the old Dollis Hill Farm. In the mid-1920s Edgware Road was developed and there was some small-scale building in the middle of Dollis Hill.

So far a large part of the area still retained much of its rur...

»more

AUGUST
11
2020

 

Braddyll Street, SE10
Braddyll Street dates from 1852 Many street names east of Greenwich relate to the Durham coal field. Col. Braddyll was one of the partners in the South Hetton Coal Company. Messrs Braddyll & Co. also then owned Dalden-le-Dale Colliery.

The locomotive ’Bradyll’ still exists and is believed to be the oldest surviving locomotive with six-driving wheels. Bradyll was built by Timothy Hackworth at his Soho Works in Shildon, County Durham in 1840. The locomotive can be seen in the National Railway Museum’s location at Shildon.

The street was labelled ’Braddyle Street’ on the Stanford 1860s map and its alignment followed the modern Thornley Place before it was later extended south.
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AUGUST
10
2020

 

Lea Bridge
Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the ...
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AUGUST
4
2020

 

Beaumont Street, W1G
Beaumont Street is the location of the King Edward VII Hospital and the Marylebone Library Beaumont Street runs from Marylebone High Street to the junction of Westmoreland Street and Weymouth Street. It was named after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century.

The street’s story began soon after the Marylebone Gardens closed in 1776, the line of the northern half being mostly laid out over the site of the gardens. The southern part was already partly developed by then.

Building leases were granted to the Thomas Neales, senior and junior, and John White, among others in the late 1780s. The street was advertised as being in as "pleasant and as healthy a situation as in the country".

Shopkeepers and professionals moved in including a lady perfumer, surgeon, cheesemonger and a bookseller-stationer. Additionally there was a teacher of writing and accounting whose manuscript collection was open to the public.

The first residents in the 1790s included a botanical painter and a celebrated harpist, ...
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JULY
23
2020

 

Thorold Road, IG1
Thorold Road dates from 1889-90 The name Thorold Road might reflect a Lincolnshire association since, while not a village name, there are two pubs called ’The Thorold Arms’ - one in Marston and the other in Harmston. The Reverend Henry Thorold lived in a vicarage in the former. A housemaster at Lancing College, he wrote for the acclaimed ’Shell Guides’ to the counties of England.

More likely is the theory that the name is derived from James Edwin Thorold Rogers (1823-1890) who was Liberal MP for Southwark. He had been influential in the ’National Liberal Land Company’. The company was renamed the ’National Land Company’ in 1893.

While not landowners in Ilford, the Balfour Group and the National (Liberal) Land Company had close political links and it was the Balfour Group - trading locally as Hobbs and Company - which developed Thorold Street.

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JULY
20
2020

 

Waterloo Road, SE1
Waterloo Road is the main road in the Waterloo area straddling the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. At the northern end near the river are the Queen Elizabeth Hall and the Hayward Gallery to the west, the National Film Theatre below the road, and the Royal National Theatre to the east. In earlier times, this was the location of Cuper’s Gardens.

Just to the south in the middle of a large roundabout with underground walkways is the British Film Institute (BFI) London IMAX Cinema. Nearby to the east is the James Clerk Maxwell Building of King’s College London, named in honour of the physicist James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879), who was a professor at the college from 1860.

A little further to the south is St John’s Waterloo church, designed by Francis Octavius Bedford and built in 1824 to celebrate the victory of the Napoleonic Wars. The church was firebombed in 1940 and much of the interior was destroyed. It was restored and reopened in 1951, serving as the parish church for the Festival of Britain on the South Bank nearby.

Continuing so...
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JULY
19
2020

 

Downing Street, SW1A
Downing Street has been the home of British Prime Minsters since the eighteenth century. For more than three hundred years Downing Street has held the official residences of the First Lord of the Treasury, an office now synonymous with that of Prime Minister, and the Second Lord of the Treasury, an office held by the Chancellor of the Exchequer. The Prime Minister’s official residence is 10 Downing Street; the Chancellor’s official residence is next door at Number 11. The government’s Chief Whip has an official residence at Number 12, although the current Chief Whip’s residence is at Number 9.

The street was built in the 1680s by Sir George Downing, 1st Baronet, on the site of a mansion, Hampden House. What was on the site before the mansion is vague, but there is evidence towards a brewhouse called The Axe, owned by the Abbey of Abingdon. Downing was a soldier and diplomat who served under Oliver Cromwell and King Charles II, and who invested in properties and acquired considerable wealth. In 1654, he purchased the lease on land east of Saint James...
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JULY
18
2020

 

Kingsway, N12
Kingsway forms the lower part of the North Finchley triangle. To improve access to the North Finchley tram depot in Woodbury Grove, Woodhouse Road was extended to form the Kingsway in 1934.

The new road ran through the grounds of Orchard Lodge, which had been owned by T.C.Newman, a prominent local benefactor. Orchard Lodge had been demolished in 1927.

»read full article


JULY
17
2020

 

Torquay Street, W2
Torquay Street underwent name changes and building changes. Formed after 1855 as Desboro Terrace, Torquay Street was called Marlborough Street by the turn of the twentieth century.

The Brindley extension of the post-war Warwick estate cleared away the streetscape, though the line of the street remained.


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JULY
16
2020

 

Totteridge Lane, N20
An east-west route existed by the early 18th century - the portion from Totteridge to Whetstone being called Totteridge Lane by 1651 Totteridge Lane was occasionally called Brick Lane in the early 19th century.

Across the junction of the Great North Road, it continued eastward across Friern Barnet along the line of the modern Oakleigh Road to Betstile.

The Butcher and Conjuror pub was licensed in 1731, stood north of the junction of the Great North Road with Totteridge Lane.

Newly built tenements at Whetstone existed in 1489. A cottage stood in Totteridge Lane by 1651 and five cottages by 1763. The Limes on the west side of the Great North Road, north of Totteridge Lane, was built by 1734, a brown-brick two-storeyed building with later additions.

Totteridge Lane crossed Dollis brook from Whetstone by 1754 and Finchley and Totteridge shared the cost of maintaining a bridge there by 1787. It was probably the footbridge which in 1826 lay south of a great ford there. A larger bridge, built in 1843 by John Hey Puget, continued to be maintained by both parish...
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JULY
15
2020

 

Wardour Street, W1F
Wardour Street is a street that runs north from Leicester Square, through Chinatown, across Shaftesbury Avenue to Oxford Street. Wardour Street is named for local 17th century landowners the Wardour family, and formerly was called Colmanhedge Lane after a nearby field. The section south of Brewer Street was formerly Prince Street prior to 1878, in parallel with Rupert Street.

There has been a thoroughfare on the site of Wardour Street on maps and plans since they were first printed, the earliest being Elizabethan. In 1585, to settle a legal dispute, a plan of what is now the West End was prepared. The dispute was about a field roughly where Broadwick Street is today. The plan was very accurate and clearly gives the name Colmanhedge Lane to this major route across the fields from what is described as "The Waye from Uxbridge to London" (Oxford Street) to what is now Cockspur Street. The old plan shows that this lane follows the modern road almost exactly, including bends at Brewer Street and Old Compton Street.

The road is also a major thoroughfare on Faithorne and Newcourt’s map s...
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JULY
14
2020

 

Borough High Street, SE1
Borough High Street was the Roman ’Stane Street’. Tt has always been one of London’s major streets as it leads to London Bridge, the only bridge across the Thames until 1750.

The earliest recorded name for the street is simply ’The Borough’. The southernmost part was called St Margaret’s Hill but by the Tudor period all of it was called ’Longe Southwark’ (’Short Southwark’ is now Tooley Street). The northern section from the junction with Duke Street Hill was renamed Wellington Street to commemorate the Duke of Wellington. From the 1890s the London County Council started to rename duplicate roads and ’Borough High Street’ became the name.

Borough High Street had many coaching inns - twenty three in total at their peak. These included the Bear, the Catherine Wheel, the George, the King’s Head, the Queen’s Head, the Tabard and the White Hart. Many of them were in use as coaching inns up to the mid nineteenth century and the railway age. These inns featured in literature such as in C...
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JULY
13
2020

 

Granville Road, N12
Granville Road connects the High Road with Ballards Lane. The junction of Granville Road with the old Great North Road, opposite Summers Lane was known as Fallow Corner - first recorded in 1429.

By the 18th century there was a small hamlet of houses next to Cobley Farm. The access roads from the corner to the main road formed the distinct bow shape of Bow Road we see today.

The Etchingham Park Estate, built between 1878 and 1920, gradually developed over Cobley Farm, which had finished as a farm in 1905. Finchley Cottage Hospital opened with 18 beds in 1908. After the First World War, Finchley council decided not to erect a war memorial and instead used the money raised to extend and rename the hospital as Finchley Memorial Hospital in 1922.
»read full article


JULY
12
2020

 

Whitgift Street, CR0
Whitgift Street commemorates an Archbishop of Canterbury. John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury (1583-1604), lived at Croydon Palace, and is buried in Croydon Minster.
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JULY
11
2020

 

Appold Street, DA8
Appold Street was named after a pump. Messrs Easton & Anderson made a pump called the Appold pump at their works nearby.

John George Appold (1800-1865) was a fur dyer and engineer. Inheriting his father’s business at the age of 22, he introduced so many scientific improvements that he amassed a fortune and was able to devote his time to mechanical pursuits. He patented few of his ideas, preferring to give them freely to the public.

His Appold centrifugal pump procured him a ’council medal’ at the Great Exhibition in 1851. Appold’s pump with curved blades showed an efficiency of 68%, more than three times better than any of the other pumps present. Sir William Anderson of Easton & Anderson improved and marketed a design of the hydraulic pump in partnership with John Appold.

He is commemorated with a memorial tablet inside St Leonard’s, Shoreditch and buried at West Norwood Cemetery.
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JULY
10
2020

 

Silverdale Road, WD23
Silverdale Road lies between Aldenham Road and Grange Road. The road dates from the Edwardian era.
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JULY
9
2020

 

Carrington Close, WD6
Carrington Close lies off of Carrington Avenue. Houses here were built slightly later than most of Borehamwood, dating from 1958. The area backs onto Woodcock Village Green.
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JULY
8
2020

 

East Lodge
East Lodge was home to the Davies family. Mr and Mrs Tom Davies lived at East Lodge with their three daughters - Anne Askew Davies and her sisters. The family was descended from John Davies, a draper of Oswestry Shropshire, and his wife, Anne Askew Whitridge. Tom Davies was manager at Hills Chemical Works.

There was a summer house looking out over the river and extensive gardens with trees planted by the Davies sisters.

East Lodge was demolished in the early years of the twentieth century with its site later used by the Yacht Club.


»read full article


JULY
7
2020

 

River Way, SE10
River Way is a short street with a long history. River Way dates ultimately from 1801 with the first appearance in the Greenwich rate books with occupants in 1804.

The site had been owned by George Russell (died in 1806). He was a soap maker of Blackfriars but had been using this part of the Greenwich Marsh as a brickfield.

In 1800, William Johnson of Bromley, Kent, had patented a tidal water wheel but lacked a site for it. In September 1801, he came to an agreement with George Russell and applied to the Commission of Sewers for ’permission to open the sea wall’.

Ceylon Place was built and the extension of the cottages to the Thames were called River Terrace and the road (eventually) River Way leading to the "Causeway in Bugsby’s Hole", licensed to Russell in 1801.

The land around quickly industrialised at the dawn of the twentieth century, River Way becoming sandwiches between a power station and a steel works.
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JULY
6
2020

 

Hounslow West
Hounslow West was once the terminus of the London Underground Hounslow branch. The original station was opened by the District Railway (now the District line) on 21 July 1884. It was originally named Hounslow Barracks since it was situated close to the Cavalry Barracks in Hounslow which were south of the station on Beavers Lane.

At first, the station was the terminus of a single track branch line from the now-closed Hounslow Town station on Hounslow High Street. This branch diverged from the main route about 300 metres east of the present Hounslow East station. When the branch opened there were no intermediate stations between this station and Osterley & Spring Grove (now called Osterley).

New stations were eventually opened and on 1 December 1925 Hounslow West, Hounslow Central and Hounslow East received their current station names. The branch had been electrified in 1905.

The original building was demolished and a new Stanley Heaps and Charles Holden-designed Hounslow West opened on 5 July 1931 on the Bath Road.»more


JULY
5
2020

 

Gants Hill
Gants Hill is an area of Ilford within the London Borough of Redbridge, 15 km northeast of Charing Cross. The name ’Gants Hill’ may derive from the le Gant family, stewards of Barking Abbey, who were originally from the Ghent area (’Gand’ in French). The name ’Gantesgrave’ appears in records from 1291.

The area was remote farmland until after the First World War.

The government had begun to provide funds to subsidise public housing. The Corporation of London proposed an estate of 2000 cottages between Cranbrook Road and Horns Road but abandoned the project before it was even half way complete.

After the Eastern Avevue was carved through the site in the mid 1920s, a developer - Charles Lord - bought the abandoned Corporation of London site and largely completed the scheme. Especially profitable for him was the conversion of properties that faced the Eastern Avenue into shops.

The focus for the new area was the Gants Hill roundabout. Largely retail, the The art deco Savoy cinema was built in 1934 (but demolished...
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JULY
4
2020

 

Ceylon Place, SE10
Ceylon Place consists of a short row of Georgian cottages and a pub called ’The Pilot’. The cottages date from 1801 and were sited on an existing lane to a large house called ’East Lodge’ which stood beside the river. The land had been owned by George Russell who was a London soap manufacturer with works near to Blackfriars Bridge. William Johnson of Bromley in Kent had patented a new design of tide mill - a mill powered by the tide. In 1801, Johnson met Russell who agreed to finance the mill. As a result, construction of the mill and the workers’ cottages of Ceylon Place began. Ceylon had recently become part of British jurisdiction. The road gained the name but the cottages were called River Terrace.

The ’Pilot’ public house also came onto the scene. It is almost certainly named after the politician William Pitt who was described in a contemporary song as "The Pilot who weathered the storm".

For nigh on one hundred years, the cottages, mill and the big house with gardens were bordered by six acres of millponds with meadows beyo...
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JULY
3
2020

 

Zulu Mews, SW11
Zulu Mews lies within the curve of a Battersea railway. At time of writing it was the last street alphabetically in London. It arrived as the latest street in Battersea in 2010.

It had been an access road to the back gardens of Rowena Crescent but, London housing pressure being what it is, became filled with ten modern dwellings in a gated development.

The curious name comes about because Rowena Crescent was originally called Zulu Crescent when laid out in 1880. The nearby streets had all been named after 1870s British military victories. Rowena Crescent residents of the 1880s did not take to the name for the road.

When the 2010 development was built, and needed a name, the original Zulu moniker was given to the new street.


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JULY
2
2020

 

Tottenham Lane, N8
Tottenham Lane forms the north-east approach to The Broadway in Crouch End. It dates from the 18th century or before and is a shopping street with three storey terraces of red brick. The street runs from the centre of Crouch End at the clock tower, north to the junction of the High Street and Turnpike Lane.

The narrowness of Tottenham Lane, the height of the buildings and continuous frontage gives it considerable sense of enclosure, with the clock tower providing a focus for the view looking south-west.
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JULY
1
2020

 

Keeley Street, WC2B
Keeley Street has a dual history Little Wild^ Street came into existence around 1690 - there is a deed dated 1 September 1690 which refers to a "toft, peece or parcell of ground, being parcell of the garden late belonging to Weld House in or near Weld Streete … abutting towards the south to a new streete or passage of thirty foote in breadth there made or intended to be made, to lead out of Weld Streete towards Duke Streete and the arch in Great Lincolne’s Inn Fields." (N.b. Duke Street later became Sardinia Street).

There was a matching Great Wild^ Street which it lay off of. Towards the end of its history, the Little Wild Street Baptist Church and a school were notable buildings.

As part of the Aldwych scheme, Keeley Street was built over the top of Little Wild^ Street with its eastern end adjusted to reach Kingsway. All the existing buildings in the original street were demolished, leaving only its route.
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