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Featured · Notting Dale ·
July
29
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Blechynden Street, W10
Blechynden Street is now a tiny street in the vicinity of Latimer Road station, W10 The stump that remains belies its story as one of the main streets of the area.

Blechynden Street crossed a 50-acre estate that a barrister, James Whitchurch, purchased for £10 an acre in the early 19th century. He left his home in Blechynden in Southampton and built himself a house in Lancaster Road, North Kensington, now situated at No. 133.

Streets were built on the estate in 1846, and the first were named Aldermaston, Silchester, Bramley and Pamber after four neighbouring villages near Basingstoke, which was where James Whitchurch’s daughter Florence Blechynden Whitchurch was living.

After dividing the land into plots, he leased them to builders such as John Calverley, a Notting Hill builder who named a street after himself.

Other developers involved were Joseph Job Martin, the landlord of The Lancaster Tavern in Walmer Road, as well as the developer of Martin Street. Stephen Hurst, a builder from Kentish Town, was r...

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JULY
13
2021

 

Eversholt Street, NW1
Eversholt Street connects Euston with Camden Town The origins of Eversholt Street lay in the 1750s when the New Road (later Euston Road) was established to bypass the congestion of London. North of this road were fields, brick works and market gardens. There was an informal path heading south from what later became Camden Town roughly along the line of the later street.

At the end of the 17th century, the Lord Chancellor John Somers acquired the local freehold. The immediate area was, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, known as Fig Mead.

The course of Eversholt Street began in the 1810s as the area developed. It provided a new route from the New Road with Camden Town. The name Eversholt Street was originally given only to its very northern, Bedford Estate part above Cranleigh Street (which was itself formerly Johnson Street). The Eversholt name refers to a village in Bedfordshire, most of the land in the village being owned by the Dukes of Bedford.

Eversholt Street is now ...
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JULY
12
2021

 

Balcombe Street, NW1
Balcombe Street is possibly a corruption of Batcombe, Dorset, in line with other Dorset-related street names in the area Balcombe Street, Dorset Square and Gloucester Place all date from 1815-1820. Balcombe Street was at first known as Milton Street.

The streets formed part of the Portman Estate. Their layout shows a social hierarchy of square, thoroughfares and side streets mirrored by a hierarchy in the design of houses, from the grand four storey buildings in Dorset Square to the rather less grand terraces and smaller houses in Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place and the significantly smaller scale of the three and two storey ‘third rate’ houses in the side streets and mews.

There are some 180 grade II buildings including the whole of Dorset Square, most of Balcombe Street and Gloucester Place. The predominant materials are brick and stucco.

The London part of the Portman Estate in Marylebone covers 110 acres and covers 68 streets, 650 buildings and four garden squares. In 1948 the Estate, then valued at £10 million, was subject to death duties of ...
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JULY
11
2021

 

Oslo Court, NW8
Oslo Court was built between 1936 and 1938 by architect Robert Atkinson Oslo Court was built over the final remaining 30 workmen’s cottages in the St John’s Wood area. These were demolished in 1936, after which the gentrification of NW8 was more or less complete (Lisson Grove notwithstanding).

The block consists of seven floors containing 125 flats, 112 of which have a direct view over Regent’s Park.

This work of Robert Atkinson has been described as the style of ’restrained modernism’ by englishbuildings.blogspot.com. Crittall windows are used and there are small sculptural panels, with Nordic themes such as a reindeer and a long boat. Each flat was designed with a living room, bedroom, kitchen, bathroom and a small hall. Each also had a balcony, and a restaurant was provided on the ground floor for the use of tenants. The rents varied from £140 to £250 per annum, according to the outward aspect of the view.

Many blocks in the area had restaurants in days gone by but have, one by one, disappeared. ...
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JULY
10
2021

 

Waldegrave Road, TW11
Waldegrave Road is named after Frances Waldegrave and was the birthplace of Sir Noël Coward Waldegrave Road was named after Frances Waldegrave, the widow of the 7th Earl Waldegrave who lived at Strawberry Hill House, situated on the road in the 19th century.

The road is split into two sections - a Teddington (TW11) part and a Twickenham (TW1) section. The Teddington part of Waldegrave Road is noted for late Victorian semi-detached villas.

This road, connecting Teddington with Strawberry Hill, was at first known as Fry’s Lane. In the early nineteenth century it became Factory Lane after Alexander Barclay built a wax manufacturing factory in 1800. After the death of Frances, Lady Waldegrave, in 1879, the name changed to its modern form.

Following enclosure at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a large pond covered the south west part of the road at the centre of Teddington. In 1863, a new railway track was built through the site of the pond. A road bridge was constructed to reunite the two parts of Teddington that had been ...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 09:12 GMT   

Dunloe Avenue, N17
I was born in 1951,my grandparents lived at 5 Dunloe Avenue.I had photos of the coronation decorations in the area for 1953.The houses were rented out by Rowleys,their ’workers yard’ was at the top of Dunloe Avenue.The house was fairly big 3 bedroom with bath and toilet upstairs,and kitchenette downstairs -a fairly big garden.My Grandmother died 1980 and the house was taken back to be rented again

Reply
Comment
Kathleen   
Added: 28 Jul 2021 08:59 GMT   

Spigurnell Road, N17
I was born and lived in Spigurnell Road no 32 from 1951.My father George lived in Spigurnell Road from 1930’s.When he died in’76 we moved to number 3 until I got married in 1982 and moved to Edmonton.Spigurnell Road was a great place to live.Number 32 was 2 up 2 down toilet out the back council house in those days

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Comment
Lewis   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 20:48 GMT   

Ploy
Allotment

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 27 Jul 2021 14:31 GMT   

correction
Chaucer did not write Pilgrims Progress. His stories were called the Canterbury Tales

Reply
Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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AUGUST
30
2020

 

Lynedoch Street, E2
Lynedoch Street used to lie behind the Shoreditch Workhouse. Before an 1890s renaming this used to be Mary Street and connected Hoxton Steet with Kingsland Road.

The street came into existence when the new Shoreditch Workhouse was built in the 1860s.

In 1774, the authorities in Shoreditch raised money for a new workhouse. It was erected on a site known as the ’Land of Promise’ and the three-storey building including an infirmary and apothecary opened in 1777 with its main entrance on Kingsland Road. In 1784, a burial ground was consecrated at its southwest corner. The labour of the inmates was sold locally.

In 1813, James Parkinson was appointed as surgeon and apothecary. He established a separate fever block in the workhouse, which was the first in London. In 1817 he published an ’Essay on the Shaking Palsy’ in which he described the condition now known as Parkinson’s Disease.

In 1847, a Parliamentary sub-committee found the workhouse to be overcrowded. In 1849, the Trustee...
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AUGUST
29
2020

 

Bramley Mews, W10
Bramley Mews become part of a redelevopment of the area north of Latimer Road station in the 1960s. Before the coming of the Silchester Estate, Bramley Mews ran between Silchester Terrace and Bramley Road.
»read full article


AUGUST
28
2020

 

Westminster Bridge Road, SE1
Westminster Bridge Road runs on an east-west axis and passes through the boroughs of Lambeth and Southwark. Between 1740 and 1746, the Commissioners of Westminster Bridge bought land from the Archbishop of Canterbury and ground in Lambeth Marsh from the Lord Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London for the approach to the bridge on the southern (then-Surrey) side. This was the start date of Westminster Bridge Road.

The Roman Catholic St George’s Cathedral, Southwark is between Westminster Bridge Road and St George’s Road, the frontage to the diocesan offices being on Westminster Bridge Road. Morley College, an adult education college, is located on the road, and so is the associated Morley Gallery.

The Lincoln Memorial Tower built by Christopher Newman Hall in the late 19th century in memory of Abraham Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation stands close to the junction with Kennington Road.

The London Necropolis railway station rebuilt its terminus in 1902, moving it to Westminster Bridge Road. The station was bombed in the London Blitz ...
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AUGUST
27
2020

 

Ely Place, EC1N
Ely Place is a gated road at the southern tip of the London Borough of Camden. It is the location of the historic Ye Olde Mitre public house and is adjacent to Hatton Garden.

It is the last privately owned street in London, having been originally an exclave of Cambridgeshire the location of the medieval abbey at Ely for the Bishops of Ely, and is managed by its own body of commissioners and beadles.

Ely Place stands on land that had been the site of Ely Palace or Ely House, the London townhouse of the Bishops of Ely from 1290 to 1772. Land in the Holborn area was bought by John de Kirkby in 1280. He was appointed Bishop of Ely in 1286 and on his death in 1290, he left the estate to the see of Ely.

In medieval times, bishops of Ely frequently held high state office requiring them to live in London; Ely Palace was the bishop’s official residence.

References to Ely Palace grounds occur in Shakespeare’s plays. It was at the house that in King Richard II, the Bard had John of Gaunt – who was living th...
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AUGUST
25
2020

 

Farrant Street, W10
Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate While there was never a street beginning with the letter J, the original streets of the Queen’s Park Estate began with the letters A through to P.

Farrant Street and Peach Street no longer exist (though there is a new Peach Road nearby). Peach Street was demolished by a 500 pound German bomb dropped by parachute. It left a big crater and the whole street was demolished. Debris from the blast was blown into the air and landed as far away as Willesden where "it fell among people coming out of a cinema."

Farrant Street went a different way. One amenity not provided, although mentioned in the initial Queen’s Park Estate prospectus, had been an open space for recreation. When Farrant Street was demolished in the 1970s, residents finally got their little oasis of greenery - a century after it was promised.


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AUGUST
24
2020

 

Wix’s Lane, SW4
Wix’s Lane is part of an ancient footpath which became made up into a formal road. Wix’s Lane, as a named footpath, ran behind the gardens and outbuildings of houses on North Side until the fine Board school and a long terrace of flats by Arthur Balls, were built in 1903-04.

In the locality, the upper end of Taybridge Road was developed by John Cathles Hill in 1894-95 as the Maitland House Estate, whilst the middle part of the street, Meteor Street, Jedburgh Street and Tregarvon Road were developed by H N Corsellis with very simplified red brick houses from 1897-1900 after the demolition of the house called Northside.
»read full article


AUGUST
23
2020

 

Western Dwellings, W10
Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers. Western Dwellings was built beside the steps leading down to Southern Row. The flats were entered through arched door ways which lead onto stone stairways. The insides of these arched entrances were tiled in dark-coloured Victorian tiles with each panel portraying a scene of working people.

In the 1890s, an outbreak of typhoid was noted there.

Beside the flats was Hamrax, the motorcyclists’ emporium, and a tobacconists/sweet shop.
»read full article


AUGUST
22
2020

 

Millwall
Millwall is the historic name for an area on the west of the Isle of Dogs. Originally known as Marshwall, the area acquired its new name after its break with the parish of Poplar - Millwall was part of Poplar until the 19th century. The new name of Millwall was due to the large number of windmills built on the river wall in the 19th century. It became heavily industrialised, containing the workplaces and homes of a few thousand dockside and shipbuilding workers.

Millwall F.C. was founded in the area during 1885 as Millwall Rovers. The team moved south of the river to New Cross in 1910.

On 31 January 1858, the largest ship of that time, the SS Great Eastern, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was launched from Napier Yard. Due to the technical difficulties of the launch, this was the last ship of such a size to be built on the island.

In the 1860s, the Millwall Dock was built, extending from the Thames into the centre of the Isle of Dogs. The spoil from the dock was left as the Mudchute.

The postw...
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AUGUST
21
2020

 

Clonmore Street, SW18
The northern end of Clonmore Street is known for the Arts and Crafts flourishes on its housing. The ’Grid’ housing development was an outstanding success from the start mainly because it coincided with the evolution of a new type of city-dweller. The much improved education system of the later Victorian era produced families with a clerk, civil servant or shopkeeper at the head, people whose taste was being moulded by popular novels and monthly magazines.

Developers enticed them out to the suburbs with houses that were spacious and attractively designed.
»read full article


AUGUST
20
2020

 

Durham House Street, WC2N
Durham House Street was the former site of a palace belonging to the bishops of Durham in medieval times. The street is built in the form of an L. Two streets called William Street and James Street formerly covered the two sides of the L shape before it was renamed. These two streetnames were already being used for others in the area.

The Bishops of Durham had held land here from about 1220. Their inn, or mansion, first built around this time for Richard le Poor, faced onto the Strand behind a grand gatehouse, with its chapel and banqueting hall reaching down to the banks of the Thames.

When Thomas Cromwell drew up the schedule for religious house closures, Durham House was high on the list, and only three years after Henry VIII declared a severance with the church of Rome it fell into the hands of the Crown. Henry, who at this time was beginning to acquire too much property to cope with, made a gift of the house to the Earl of Wiltshire, and when he had finished with it, it became the home of Princess Elizabeth. Within the walls of Durham House Lady Jane Gr...
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AUGUST
19
2020

 

High Road, N12
High Road, N12 is part of the ancient Great North Road - leading from London to Edinburgh. The road from London which came to be known as the Great North Road played an important part in Finchley’s history. 16th century London map John Norden’s belief that the ancient highway to Barnet followed the line of Friern Barnet Lane was perhaps correct, since Finchley wood originally presented a barrier to travellers and Finchley’s earliest settlement was not on the line of the later Great North Road.

The change probably took place during the late 13th century or the 14th.

The hamlet of East End grew up during the 14th century at the exit of the road from Hornsey park but it is uncertain whether the route then passed directly northward across the common, as it did by Norden’s time, or whether it followed East End Road through Church End and along Ballards Lane to Whetstone.

Pavage was granted to the townsmen of Barnet in 1347 on the road from St. Albans to Finchley wood and to two Highgate men in 1354 for the road from Highgate...
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AUGUST
18
2020

 

Shaftesbury Avenue, W1D
Shaftesbury Avenue is a major street in the West End of London, named after Anthony Ashley Cooper, 7th Earl of Shaftesbury. Shaftesbury Avenue runs in a north-easterly direction from Piccadilly Circus to New Oxford Street, crossing Charing Cross Road at Cambridge Circus. From Piccadilly Circus to Cambridge Circus it is in the City of Westminster, and from Cambridge Circus to New Oxford Street it is in the London Borough of Camden.

Shaftesbury Avenue was built between 1877 and 1886 by the architect George Vulliamy and the engineer Sir Joseph Bazalgette to provide a north-south traffic artery through the crowded districts of St. Giles and Soho. It was also part of a slum clearance measure, to push impoverished workers out of the city centre; although the street’s construction was stalled by legislation requiring rehousing some of these displaced residents, overcrowding persisted. Charles Booth’s Poverty Map shows the neighbourhood makeup shortly after Shaftesbury Avenue opened.

It is generally considered the heart of London’s West End theatre district, with the Lyric, Apo...
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AUGUST
17
2020

 

Royal Crescent, W11
The Royal Crescent is a Grade II* listed street in Holland Park. The Royal Crescent is consisting of two curved facing terraces in a crescent shape. The crescent is located on the north side of Holland Park Avenue, west of Addison Avenue, and to the east of the Holland Park Roundabout.

Between the facing terraces is a landscaped communal garden with expansive lawns and numerous trees. The houses themselves are stucco fronted and are built on four floors, with porticoed entrances, above which are small first-floor balconies with iron railings. Each of the end houses have circular corners.

Designed in 1839, The Royal Crescent was inspired by its older namesake in Bath, it differs from the Bath crescent in that it is not strictly a true crescent but rather two quadrant terraces each terminated by a circular bow in the Regency style, rising as a tower, a feature which would not have been found in the earlier classically inspired architecture of the 18th century which the design of the crescent seeks to emulate. The plan of...
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AUGUST
16
2020

 

Barons Court
Barons Court station serves the District and Piccadilly lines. Barons Court lies between West Kensington and Hammersmith on the District line, and between Earl’s Court and Hammersmith on the Piccadilly line.

When the through tracks were laid on 9 September 1874, the area now known as Barons Court was an area of market gardens west of the hamlet of North End. By the beginning of the 20th century, the area had been developed for housing. On 9 October 1905, the District Railway opened a station to serve the new developments and in preparation for the 1906 opening of the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway (now the Piccadilly line), then under construction. There is now easy cross-platform interchange between the two lines: District and Piccadilly.

The station is now the final surface stop for eastbound trains on the Piccadilly line until emerging back into the open air at Arnos Grove. In the 1990s, the Grade II listed station was carefully restored to its original appearance.
»read full article


AUGUST
15
2020

 

Ormiston Grove, W12
Ormiston Grove dates from the Edwardian era. The area known as The Groves – taking in Ormiston Grove, Oaklands Grove and Adelaide Grove – is where developers originally built charming red-brick cottages that are now a collection of self-contained maisonettes and little houses dating from around 1908.
»read full article


AUGUST
14
2020

 

Warley Road, CM13
Warley Road connects Brentwood with Harold Hill. Warley Road’s main claim to distinction it that is a road with a CM13 postcode which lies within the M25. This distinction is really one for the nerds though...
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AUGUST
13
2020

 

Aubrey Road, W8
Aubrey Road leads into Aubrey Walk, which runs west of Campden Hill Road at the top of Campden Hill. It was named in the 1840s. Aubrey Road is on a steep slope going down to Holland Park Avenue.

It contains some of the most attractive houses in the area and these are substantial family houses set back from the road all in varying styles and with off-street parking. The houses range from Georgian to Gothic in style and a few of contemporary style.

In Tudor times, there was a 20 acre farm called Stonehills south of what is know Holland Park Avenue. Originally it was owned by Sir Walter Cope, who sold it to Robert Horseman in 1599. Eventually it came into the possession of the Lloyd Family who sold it in 1823 to Joshua Flesher Hanson, a substantial developer in the Notting Hill and Holland Park area. He built Campden Hill Square. Aubrey Road was originally designed as a service road for the houses on the west side of Campden Hill Square.

Hanson sold much of the land to James Hora, a surgeon, in 1841. Hora died shortly afterwards but his widow employed Henry Wyatt, an a...
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AUGUST
12
2020

 

Dollis Hill Lane, NW2
Dollis Hill Lane is an ancient throughway. At the time of the Enclosure Award of 1816, the area of a 16th century farm at Oxgate, another farm at the top of Dollis Hill, a mansion known as Neasden House and some 75 fields resulting from the enclosure. The region was typical open farming country and the only road across the area was Dollis Hill Lane which traversed it from east to west. Dollis Hill House was built in 1825 and the railway in 1868. By 1895 there was a golf-course to the south west.

Residential building really started in the south-east of Dollis Hill from 1907-08.

Of the major landmarks constructed in the first quarter of the century, the two most noteworthy are St. Andrew’s Hospital, built in 1913, and the Post Office Research Station which rose in 1923 on the site of the old Dollis Hill Farm. In the mid-1920s Edgware Road was developed and there was some small-scale building in the middle of Dollis Hill.

So far a large part of the area still retained much of its rur...
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AUGUST
11
2020

 

Braddyll Street, SE10
Braddyll Street dates from 1852. Many street names east of Greenwich relate to the Durham coal field. Col. Braddyll was one of the partners in the South Hetton Coal Company. Messrs Braddyll & Co. also then owned Dalden-le-Dale Colliery.

The locomotive ’Bradyll’ still exists and is believed to be the oldest surviving locomotive with six-driving wheels. Bradyll was built by Timothy Hackworth at his Soho Works in Shildon, County Durham in 1840. The locomotive can be seen in the National Railway Museum’s location at Shildon.

The street was labelled ’Braddyle Street’ on the Stanford 1860s map and its alignment followed the modern Thornley Place before it was later extended south.
»read full article


AUGUST
10
2020

 

Lea Bridge
Lea Bridge is a district spanning an area between the London boroughs of Hackney and Waltham Forest. It is named for a timber bridge built across the River Lea in 1745 which formed the dividing line between Middlesex and Essex. The road leading to it became known as Lea Bridge Road, with a tollhouse at the Middlesex bank. The bridge was rebuilt in 1821 and tolls continued to be levied until 1872.

Lea Bridge gives access to the lower reaches of the extensive Lee Valley Park. To the south are the Hackney Marshes, and to the north the Walthamstow Marshes.

The old Middlesex Filter Beds have been converted into a nature reserve, and on the Leyton side the Essex Filter Beds are now a reserve for birds. Next to the south side of the bridge are two pubs: ’The Princess of Wales’ and ’The Ship Aground’.

Lea Bridge station opened on 15 September 1840 by the Northern and Eastern Railway as Lea Bridge Road and is thought to be the earliest example of a station having its building on a railway bridge, with staircases down to the ...
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AUGUST
9
2020

 

Oxford Circus, W1B
Oxford Circus was originally called Regent Circus. The development of Oxford Street began in the 18th century once local fields had been purchased by the Earl of Oxford.

In 1739, a gardener called Thomas Huddle built property on the north side. Buildings were erected on the corner of Oxford Street and Davies Street in the 1750s and further development occurred between 1763 and 1793.

By the end of the 18th century, Oxford Street had been built up from St Giles Circus to Park Lane, containing a mix of residential houses, pubs and theatres.

Oxford Circus was designed as part of the development of Regent Street by the architect John Nash in 1810. The four quadrants of the circus were designed by Sir Henry Tanner and built between 1913 and 1928.
»read full article


AUGUST
8
2020

 

Colville Square, W11
Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill. In the middle ages the Colville area was farmland, part of the manor of Notting Barns, passing through various landlords and by the 18th century was owned by the Talbot family.

In 1852, the family attempted to sell the farmland, now reduced in size by earlier sales to the Great Western Railway and the gas company. As the land was considered too remote for building speculators to be interested, there was only one buyer, Dr. Samuel Walker, a speculative builder behind part of the neighbouring Ladbroke estate.

The building of All Saints’ Church began in 1852 but very little other building work took place. In 1860 the builder, George Frederick John Tippett acquired much of the land. He was a prominent builder of the time and combined the roles of landlord, developer and builder.

The development of his estate took place between 1860 and 1875. Three parts, one each in Colville Square, Colville Gardens and Powis Square, backed on to shallow comm...
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AUGUST
7
2020

 

Ballards Lane, N12
Ballards Lane is the main road linking Finchley Central with North Finchley. Ballards Lane was originally called Over Street, contrasting it with Nether Street, which still runs in parallel to the west. It was an important medieval thoroughfare, named after a family who were living here in 1263. The estate of Ballards Reding, later Wimbush Farm, stretched across to Fallow Corner.

By the 15th century large houses set in spacious grounds were appearing along the lane. Many of these properties were rebuilt in the 17th century.

With the construction of Regent’s Park Road the lane became a turnpike in 1826 and was extended to a new junction with the Great North Road, bringing an increase in development. By 1851 the lane had 56 houses and seven under construction, which was positively heaving for such a rural outpost of London at this time, and made it the most populous part of Finchley.

Most of Ballards Lane was rebuilt again from the early years of the 20th century onwards, much of it with parades of shops and flats.
»read full article


AUGUST
6
2020

 

Kirby Street, EC1N
Kirby Street was named for Christopher Hatton’s Kirby House in Northamptonshire. The author Strype in 1720 described this area as being "a very large place, containing several streets—viz., Hatton Street, Charles Street, Cross Street, and Kirby Street, all which large tract of ground was a garden, and belonged to Hatton House, now pulled down, and built into houses."

The Hatton Garden area between Leather Lane in the west and Saffron Hill in the east, and from Holborn in the south to Hatton Wall in the north, was developed as a new residential district in the Restoration period, between 1659 and 1694.

It was formerly the site of the mediaeval palace, gardens and orchard of the Bishops of Ely, forming their City residence. The palace stood in the south-east corner, on the site of Ely Place.

During the 1570s Queen Elizabeth’s Chancellor and favourite, Sir Christopher Hatton, held a lease of part of the site and developed Hatton House to the north-west of the palace. After his death it passed into the possession of La...
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AUGUST
5
2020

 

Kew Green, TW9
Kew Green is the road around the perimeter of the green of the same name. A meadow east of Kew Bridge was made into common land as part of a plan to build a new palace at Kew. Designed to replace the Dutch House, it was never carried out. In the early 19th century Sir Richard Phillips already described the ’dwelling-houses’ bounding Kew Green. Indeed, most of the older houses in Kew were built around the Green.

Within walking distance of the River Thames, the green acts as a good starting point for a rambling walk along the towpath. There is also a cricket pitch which is used frequently during the summer.

Kew Pond, an old horse pond is a habitat for a range of water birds. The water level is managed by a sluice gate that allows river water to fill the pond via an underground channel during the high spring tide.

There are a few pubs in Kew Green - the Coach and Horses at 8 Kew^ Green, the Greyhound at 82 Kew^ Green. The Rose and Crown - from 2013, The Cricketers is at 79 Kew^ Green.

From 1964 u...
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AUGUST
4
2020

 

Beaumont Street, W1G
Beaumont Street is the location of the King Edward VII Hospital and the Marylebone Library. Beaumont Street runs from Marylebone High Street to the junction of Westmoreland Street and Weymouth Street. It was named after Sir Beaumont Hotham, local leaseholder in the late 18th century.

The street’s story began soon after the Marylebone Gardens closed in 1776, the line of the northern half being mostly laid out over the site of the gardens. The southern part was already partly developed by then.

Building leases were granted to the Thomas Neales, senior and junior, and John White, among others in the late 1780s. The street was advertised as being in as "pleasant and as healthy a situation as in the country".

Shopkeepers and professionals moved in including a lady perfumer, surgeon, cheesemonger and a bookseller-stationer. Additionally there was a teacher of writing and accounting whose manuscript collection was open to the public.

The first residents in the 1790s included a botanical painter and a celebrated harpist, ...
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AUGUST
3
2020

 

Tweed Street, SW8
Tweed Street now lies under New Covent Garden Market. Frederick Haines, originally a solicitor, acquired land between Sleaford Street and what become Haines Street in the early 1860s. A plan was formulated by W. R. Glasier of Glasier & Son, surveyors. It comprised five new streets: Haines Street, Moat Street, Tweed Street, Arden Street and Cherwell Street.

The streets disappeared in the early 1970s as part of the siting of the New Covent Garden Market.
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AUGUST
2
2020

 

Market Place, N2
Market Place developed from Finchley’s Hogmarket - so named by 1897. Robert Osborne lived in 1557 at a house which may be identifiable with the Park Gate, later Park Lodge, in Hogmarket which was the home of the Odells and Jordans. East End House on the north side of East End Road, later part of John Bacon’s estates, may have been a new tenement mentioned in 1579.

On the south side of the road Old House and Elm House, later Elmshurst, may have dated from the late 16th century and been extended in the 17th; a fire-place in Old House was dated 1649.

Many inns appeared during the 18th century including on the Hogmarket, the George (from 1716) and the Three Horseshoes (1722-79).

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AUGUST
1
2020

 

Abbots Lane, SE1
Abbots Lane was named in memory of the medieval Abbots of Lewes. The Abbots of Lewes used their palatial mansion in Tooley Street when they came to visit Bermondsey. The Prior of Lewes supervised the foundation of the Cluniac Abbey at the bottom of Bermondsey Street — its main cloister now is where Bermondsey Square is.

Lewes Priory remained the head of the Cluniac order in England.

Abbots Lane was until the twentieth century known as Stoney Lane.
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