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Featured · Hampstead Garden Suburb ·
December
8
2021

The Underground Map is a project which is creating street histories for the areas of London and surrounding counties lying inside the M25.

In a series of maps from the 1750s until the 1950s, you can see how London grew from a city which only reached as far as Park Lane into the post war megapolis we know today. There are now over 85 000 articles on all variety of locations including roads, houses, schools, pubs and palaces.

You can begin exploring by choosing a place from the dropdown list at the top left and then clicking Reset Location.

As maps are displayed, click on the markers to view location articles.

You can also view historical maps of London - click on the "pile of paper" control on the top right of a page's map to change to a particular decade.

Latest on The Underground Map...
Elephant Field
The grazing elephants of Hampstead Garden Suburb... One of the last occupiers of nearby Park Farm was the circus proprietor Lord George Sanger, who retired there in 1904, and was notoriously murdered by a farm hand in 1911. His descendants continued the circus in operation until the 1960s.

When the circus was not touring, Sanger would put his elephants out of pasture in what would become, in a few years, Hampstead Garden Suburb.

An elderly former resident of Denman Drive - constructed in 1908 on what was once Westminster Abbey’s land - used to recall ‘elephants grazing’ in the field between Big Wood and Little Wood, before Denman Drive North and Denman Drive South - constructed in 1912 on what was once the Bishop’s land - were completed.

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OCTOBER
22
2021

 

East Street, SE17
East Street, famous for its market, is likely to have been the birthplace of Charlie Chaplin, although no birth certificate exists There had been street trading in the Walworth area since the 16th century, when farmers rested their livestock on Walworth Common before continuing to the city.

In the 17th century, the area through which East Street now runs was rural fields and common land where people could graze their animals. The area to the north was known as ‘Lock’s Field’ and, even in 1878, was described as little more than ‘a dreary swamp’.

Most of the land in the area was owned by the Church, but some was eventually sold or leased. By the 1770s, some land near the junction with Old Kent Road (known then simply as The Kent Road) was cultivated as a flower nursery by the Driver family, who were also responsible for commissioning the grand buildings at nearby Surrey Square.

A legal document from 1780 describes the sale of the land which led to the creation of East Street as a public highway, connecting Walworth Road wit...
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OCTOBER
21
2021

 

George Street, TW9
George Street is the high street in Richmond and was one of the first streets to be developed in the town Previously known as Great Street, George Street was renamed after King George III in 1769.

Buildings on the street include the Grade II listed Greyhound House, formerly the Greyhound Hotel in a building dating from the 1730s. The facade of the former General Post Office building at 70–72 George Street, now a retail store, incorporates the coat of arms of the former Municipal Borough of Richmond, which existed from 1890 to 1965.
»read full article


OCTOBER
20
2021

 

BT Tower, W1W
The BT Tower is a communications tower, previously known as the GPO Tower, the Post Office Tower and the Telecom Tower The main tower structure is 177 metres high, with a further section of aerial rigging bringing the total height to 191 metres. The building was designed by the architects of the Ministry of Public Building and Works: Eric Bedford and G. R. Yeats.

The structure was commissioned by the General Post Office (GPO) and its primary purpose was to support the microwave aerials then used to carry telecommunications traffic from London to the rest of the country. It replaced a much shorter tower which had been built on the roof of the neighbouring Museum telephone exchange to provide a television link between London and Birmingham. The taller structure was required to protect the radio links’ "line of sight" against some of the tall buildings in London then in the planning stage.

The narrow cylindrical shape was chosen because of the requirements of the communications aerials: the building shifts no more than 25 centimetres in high wind speeds. Initially, th...
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OCTOBER
19
2021

 

Kilburn Toll
The Kilburn Toll Gate dated from 1710 The main road out of London towards the northwest was Watling Street. It had fallen into serious disrepair given its important status. A new source of funds was needed to maintain the highway. In 1710, a turnpike was established improving the road quality tremendously. There was a toll gate at Kilburn Bridge to charge road users at the entrance to Willesden parish.

Kilburn Toll Gate was situated at the southern end of Kilburn High Road beside the junction with Kilburn Priory.

After 1827, the Metropolitan Turnpike Trust was the body responsible for maintaining the main roads in the north of the conurbation of London. The commissioners took over from fourteen existing turnpike trusts, including the one at Kilburn, and were empowered to levy tolls to meet the costs of road maintenance.

Later the tollgate was moved to Shoot Up Hill before the turnpike was abolished altogether in 1872 as the Metropolitan Turnpike Trust was disbanded. The toll s...
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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

Reply
Comment
Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

Reply
Comment
STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

Reply

STEPHEN ARTHUR JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:12 GMT   

Lynedoch Street, E2
my father Arthur Jackson was born in lynedoch street in 1929 and lived with mm grandparents and siblings, until they were relocated to Pamela house Haggerston rd when the street was to be demolished

Reply

Sir Walter Besant   
Added: 11 Nov 2021 18:47 GMT   

Sir Walter adds....
All the ground facing Wirtemberg Street at Chip and Cross Streets is being levelled for building and the old houses are disappearing fast. The small streets leading through into little Manor Street are very clean and tenanted by poor though respectable people, but little Manor Street is dirty, small, and narrow. Manor Street to Larkhall Rise is a wide fairly clean thoroughfare of mixed shops and houses which improves towards the north. The same may be said of Wirtemberg Street, which commences poorly, but from the Board School north is far better than at the Clapham end.

Source: London: South of the Thames - Chapter XX by Sir Walter Besant (1912)

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
tom   
Added: 3 Nov 2021 05:16 GMT   

I met
someone here 6 years ago

Reply
Comment
Fion Anderson   
Added: 2 Nov 2021 12:55 GMT   

Elstree not Borehamwood
Home of the UK film industry

Reply

JUNE
30
2021

 

Snaresbrook
Snaresbrook’s name derives from a corruption of Sayers Brook, a tributary of the River Roding that flows through Wanstead to the east. Snaresbrook was a coaching halt on the road to Epping - horses were changed at the Eagle Hotel.

Snaresbrook’s most notable building is Snaresbrook Crown Court. It was opened in 1843 as an Infant Orphan Asylum by King Leopold II of Belgium, and later became a school. It was designed by Gilbert Scott and William Bonython Moffatt. The Merchant Seamen’s Orphan Asylum was built in 1862 and later served as a convent and then a hospital.

Despite being on today’s London Underground, Snaresbrook station actually predates it. The station was opened by the Eastern Counties Railway on 22 August 1856 as part of the Eastern Counties Railway branch to Loughton, which was eventually extended to Epping and Ongar in 1865.

The New Wanstead estate was laid out south of the station and the remainder of the area filled out during the remainder of the nineteenth century, culminating with the Drive estate, which was begun in 1896.

The stati...
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JUNE
29
2021

 

Shepherds Bush
Shepherd’s Bush is an area of west London in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Although it is primarily residential in character, its focus is the shopping area of Shepherd’s Bush Green, with the Westfield shopping centre lying a short distance to the north. The main thoroughfares are Uxbridge Road, Goldhawk Road and Askew Road, all containing a large number of small and mostly independent shops, pubs and restaurants. The Loftus Road football stadium in Shepherd’s Bush is home to Queens Park Rangers F.C.. In 2011, the population of the area was 39,724.

The district is bounded by Hammersmith to the south, Holland Park and Notting Hill to the east, Harlesden to the north and by Acton and Chiswick to the west. White City forms the northern part of Shepherd’s Bush. Shepherd’s Bush comprises the Shepherd’s Bush Green, Askew, and White City wards.
»read full article


JUNE
28
2021

 

Seven Sisters
Seven Sisters’s name is derived from seven elms which were planted in a circle with a walnut tree at their centre on an area of common land known as Page Green. In his early seventeenth-century work, Brief Description of Tottenham, local vicar and historian William Bedwell singled out the [[42066|Page Green]] walnut tree for particular mention. He wrote of it as a local ’arboreal wonder’ which ’flourished without growing bigger’. He described it as popularly associated with the burning of an unknown Protestant. There is also speculation that the tree was ancient, possibly going back as far as Roman times, perhaps standing in a sacred grove or pagan place of worship.

The walnut vanished at some point, leaving the circle of elms. These were first recorded as the Seven Sisters in 1732.

The location of the seven trees can be tracked through a series of maps from 1619 on. From 1619 they are shown in a position which today corresponds with the western tip of Page Green at the junction of Broad Lane and the High Road. With urbanisation radically changing the area, the ’Seven Sisters’ had been replanted by 1...
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JUNE
27
2021

 

Russell Square
Russell Square station, now on London’s Piccadilly Line, was opened by the Great Northern, Piccadilly and Brompton Railway on 15 December 1906. Russell Square itself is named after the surname of the Earls and Dukes of Bedford, who developed the family’s London landholdings in the 17th and 18th centuries, beginning with Covent Garden (Bedford Street). Russell Square was formed when new streets were laid out by the Duke on the site of the gardens of his former home Bedford House, their London house. Other local street names relating to the Duke of Bedford include Bedford Square, Bedford Place, Bedford Avenue, Bedford Row and Bedford Way; Woburn Square and Woburn Place (from Woburn Abbey); Tavistock Square, Tavistock Place and Tavistock Street (Marquess of Tavistock), and Thornhaugh Street (after a subsidiary title Baron of Thornhaugh). The street lamps around this area carry the Bedford Arms.

The station is situated on Bernard Street. It is a small but busy station, used by office workers and tourists staying in Bloomsbury’s numerous hotels. The building was designed by Leslie Green and is a Grade II listed ...
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JUNE
26
2021

 

Ruislip Manor
The construction of a halt on the Metropolitan Railway in the area in 1912 led to the development of Ruislip Manor on what was rural land. A developer called George Ball purchased 186 acres to the south of the railway line from the owners, King’s College, with construction of a new estate taking place between 1933 and 1939.

Ball hoped the new housing would be available to the working man who wished to purchase his own home. The original plan under the Manor Homes name had been for 2,322 homes which Ball agreed would not number more than 14 per acre.

The total number of houses was gradually reduced by 50 in 1934, then a further 35 in 1935, to allow the inclusion of Lady Bankes Primary School, St. Paul’s Church and the Black Bull public house.

The Metropolitan Railway (Harrow and Uxbridge Railway) had constructed the line through Ruislip Manor between Harrow on the Hill and Uxbridge and commenced services in 1904 with, initially, the only intermediate stop being at Ruislip. At first, services were operated by steam trains, but track electrification was completed in ...
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JUNE
25
2021

 

Sloane Square
Sloane Square station was opened on 24 December 1868 by the Metropolitan District Railway when the company opened the first section of its line. The construction of the station was complicated by the crossing of the site by the River Westbourne which ran through Hyde Park as the Serpentine Lake, and was originally crossed by the Knight’s Bridge at Knightsbridge. The river was carried above the platform in a large iron pipe suspended from girders. It remains in place today

Meanwhile, Sloane Square itself lies at the east end of the trendy King’s Road and at the south end of Sloane Street.
In the early 1980s, it lent its name to the Sloane Rangers, the young underemployed and ostentatiously well-off members of the upper classes. Lady Diana Spencer, before she become Princess of Wales was considered the epitome of a Sloane Ranger.

The Square has two notable buildings: Peter Jones department store and the Royal Court Theatre.
»read full article


JUNE
24
2021

 

Ruislip Gardens
Ruislip Gardens is on the Central Line, situated between West Ruislip and South Ruislip. The tracks through the station were laid by part of the Great Western and Great Central Joint Railway with services starting on 2 April 1906 although there was no station at Ruislip Gardens at that time. The station opened on 9 July 1934 at the point where West End Road crossed Yeading Brook.

As part of the 1935-40 New Works Programme, Central line services were projected westwards from a new junction, west of North Acton on the line to Ealing Broadway. The original intention was to extend the service as far as Denham, but work was delayed by World War II and the formation of the Metropolitan Green Belt after the war and so the terminus of the extension was cut back to West Ruislip, with services starting on 21 November 1948.

The main line services stopping at Ruislip Gardens ceased on 21 July 1958 and their station closed, leaving only the Central line services in place.

The station achieved poetic immortality in John Betjeman’s poem ’...
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JUNE
23
2021

 

Camden Town
Camden Town tube station is a major junction on the Northern Line and one of the busiest stations on the London Underground network. It is particularly busy at weekends with tourists visiting Camden Market and Camden High Street. Camden is well-known for Camden Market which is a major tourist attraction, particularly busy at weekends, selling variety of fashion, antiques, lifestyle and bizarre goods; they (and the surrounding shops) are popular with young people, in particular those searching for alternative clothing.

It is an area popular with overseas students who come to Camden to learn English and find a job in one of the local bars or restaurants. The oldest established language school is Camden College of English, which is located at the Chalk Farm side of the market.

The Regent’s Canal runs through the north end of Camden Town and is a popular walk in summer.

Camdem Town tube station began life as part of the original route of the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR) (now part of the Northern Line). As the line here branched into two routes, to Hampstead and to Highgate, the design of the station was rather unusual, shaped like a V. ...
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JUNE
22
2021

 

Yorkshire Grey Yard, WC1V
Yorkshire Grey Yard lies off of Eagle Street, WC1 Yorkshire Grey Yard is not quite the picture we would expect to find if purely relying on the illusion conjured up by its haughty sounding name. This dejected cul-de-sac which once sported one of the most fashionable taverns in town is now private and just a little grubby.

The Yorkshire Grey Tavern, named after the horses popularly used by many of the stage-coach companies, was probably built here around the beginning of the 18th century and demolished about the mid to late 19th century. Despite its standing among the upper crust of society there remains only a fragment in reference to its history.
»read full article


JUNE
21
2021

 

Hall Place Crescent, DA5
Hall Place Crescent was built between 1951 and 1953. In the late 1930s Bexley Urban District Council acquired part of the Halcot and Hall Place Estates for house building to the north of Bourne Road. Bexley Borough Council was then in the country of Kent, put up the "Halcot No.2 Estate" after the Second World War.
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JUNE
20
2021

 

St James’s Place, EC3A
St James’s Place was an open square, formerly Broad Court, which held a daily market that sold fruits of various kinds. The fruit of the orange tree was the most predominant and therefore the locals gave this market the name of ’Orange Market’.

In the middle of St James Place stood a manned Fire Station. Made of wood, it was around 1888 that this structure was converted to brick. It had 3 men on duty over the evening period and outside was a cart with ladders. Next to this station was a free standing gas lamp. Another lamp was situated right above the covered entrance of St James passage that led to Mitre Square. Apart from St James Passage, access to the Place could be obtained via Little Duke Street (which crossed the top of Duke Street from Houndsditch to St James Place) in the east, or King Street in the west.

St. James’s Place was later renamed Creechurch Place.
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JUNE
19
2021

 

Huxley Street, W10
Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate. Before construction started in 1874, the Queen’s Park Estate was proving very popular - 1500 applications from prospective tenants had been received.

By 1881 there were five classes of property, the rents varying according to the size and number of rooms. Queen’s Park was a success The Queen’s Park Estate was sold to Paddington Council in 1964 and it is the only Estate of its type within Westminster.
»read full article


JUNE
18
2021

 

Royal Society
The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine. The Society has played a part in some of the most fundamental, significant, and life-changing discoveries in scientific history and Royal Society scientists continue to make outstanding contributions to science in many research areas.

The origins of the Royal Society lie in an ’invisible college’ of natural philosophers who began meeting in the mid-1640s to discuss the new philosophy of promoting knowledge of the natural world through observation and experiment, which we now call science.

Its official foundation date is 28 November 1660, when a group of 12 met at Gresham College after a lecture by Christopher Wren, then the Gresham Professor of Astronomy, and decided to found ’a Colledge for the Promoting of Physico-Mathematicall Experimentall Learning’. This group included Wren himself, Robert Boyle, John Wilkins, Sir Robert Moray, and William, Viscount Brouncker.

The Royal Society’s motto ’Nullius in verba’ roughly transla...
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JUNE
17
2021

 

Juniper Street, E1
Juniper Street is now simply a cul-de-sac It was formerly known as Juniper Row and originally ran east as far as Glamis Road and west to Shadwell Street. It was laid out in the 1820s over an area of rope walks called Sun Tavern Fields. Sun Tavern Fields were described in The Environs of London (published in 1795) as "The only land not occupied by buildings consists of a few acres, ..., in which are several rope-walks, 400 yards in length, where cables are made from six to 23 inches in girth."

Sun Tavern Fields had laid open partly due to the ’Shadwell Spa’, a mineral water "of a very powerful nature" discovered in the eighteenth century by Walter Berry who sank a well in the fields. It is said to be "impregnated with sulphur, vitriol, steel and antimony".

Once built following the line of a rope walk, Juniper Street became mostly a densely-urbanised residential working class street. There was a fire station on the corner of Glamis Road and a police station on the corner of King David Lane. Al...
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JUNE
16
2021

 

St Martin’s Le Grand, EC2V
St Martin’s Le Grand is a street north of Newgate Street and a former liberty within the City of London St Martin’s Le Grand was west of an ancient college of secular canons. The institution was situated in the parish of St Leonard, Foster Lane. According to a tradition, the college and church dedicated to St Martin of Tours dated to the 7th or 8th century and was founded by King Wihtred of Kent. It was associated about 1056 during the reign of Edward the Confessor with two brothers, Ingelric and Girard.

The St Martin college was taken over by Westminster Abbey in 1503 as part of the endowment granted to upkeep the Henry VII Chapel. The college was dissolved by King Henry VIII and demolished in 1548.

St Martin’s Le Grand church was responsible for the sounding of the curfew bell in the evenings, which announced the closing of the city’s gates. Until 1697, it had certain rights of sanctuary. The link with Westminster Abbey meant that the precinct was subsequently regarded as part of Westminster and was a liberty - outside the legal jurisdiction of the ...
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JUNE
15
2021

 

Trafalgar Square, WC2N
Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. Trafalgar Square was built around the area formerly known as Charing Cross.

The site of Trafalgar Square had been a significant landmark since the 13th century and originally contained the King’s Mews. After George IV moved the mews to Buckingham Palace, the area was redeveloped by John Nash, but progress was slow after his death, and the square did not open until 1844. The 52-metre Nelson’s Column at its centre is guarded by four lion statues. A number of commemorative statues and sculptures occupy the square, but the Fourth Plinth, left empty since 1840, has been host to contemporary art since 1999.

The square has been used for community gatherings and political demonstrations, including Bloody Sunday, the first Aldermaston March, anti-war protests, and campaigns against climate change. A Christmas tree has been donated to the square by Norway since 1947 and is erected for twelve days before and after Christmas Day.

The square is a ...
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JUNE
14
2021

 

Blackhorse Road
Blackhorse Road station is a London Overground and London Underground station, which is located on the junction of Blackhorse Road with Forest Road in Walthamstow. The station below ground is on the Victoria Line of the London Underground and it is the penultimate station on the eastern end of that line. Above ground, the station is located approximately at the midpoint of the Gospel Oak to Barking Line of the London Overground.

The station was opened on 19 July 1894 by the Tottenham and Forest Gate Railway, and was originally situated east of Blackhorse Lane. The station was resited in 1968 and expanded by the addition of the underground platforms. The tube station opened on 1 September 1968.
»read full article


JUNE
13
2021

 

Walthamstow Central
Walthamstow Central is the northern terminus of the Victoria line and one of five stations on the Chingford branch of the Lea Valley lines operated by London Overground since 2015. The station was opened on 26 April 1870 by the Great Eastern Railway as ’Hoe Street’.

The station became an interchange station and the eastern terminus of the Victoria line with London Underground services starting on 1 September 1968 when station’s present name was adopted.

On 31 May 2015, London Overground serves also began serving the station.
»read full article


JUNE
12
2021

 

Gillespie Road, N5
Gillespie Road runs east–west along the north side of Arsenal Stadium. Gillespie Road dates from the 1870 as a spate of building transformed the area.

Part of the course of Hackney Brook ran along Gillespie Road. The stream rises near Mercers Road, running south to cross Holloway Road and then continuing to Lowman Road, where it turns north-east and runs along Gillespie Road to Mountgrove Road.

Gillespie Road station was opened in 1906, granting access to St John`s Divinity College, Highbury Hill, as well as serving the surrounding streets of St Thomas’ Road, Avenell Road and Blackstock Road. Rows of terraced houses were just beginning to appear in this part of London, justifying the station.

Gillespie Road station was renamed to ’Arsenal’ in 1932 after pressure from the football club. The Gillespie Road name is still displayed on the original Edwardian platform tiling.

Many small works and businesses appeared in Gillespie Road during the 1930s.
»read full article


JUNE
11
2021

 

Alsen Road, N7
Alsen Road, which existed between 1851 and 1972 crossed the still-extant Andover Road. The location of Alsen Road was part of the local Long Lands estate. This was bought by the St Pancras, Marylebone and Paddington Freehold Land Society which sold off in plots in 1851.

The provisional street name for Alsen Road was Reform Road, the name approved in 1864 and reflecting the Society’s aim to create more voters. Other local street names were Franchise Road (Andover Road), Liberty Road (later Victor Road) and Freehold Road (which became Durham Road). The Franchise public house was about halfway along the street on the corner of Franchise Road/Andover Road.

The northern half of the street was Reform Road and the southern half Alsen Road. In 1877, the whole street became Alsen Road.

Alsen is the German form of Als, an island the chief town of which is Sonderburg in German (hence Sonderburg Road) but Sønderborg in Danish. The First Schleswig War took place between 1848 and 1851, some of the action taking place around Als. In 1864...
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JUNE
10
2021

 

Two Puddings
The Two Puddings was situated at 27 Stratford Broadway. The first mention of the Two Puddings as a Stratford pub seem to date from the 1890s.

During the twentieth century, the Two Puddings became a notorious pub, known locally as the Butcher’s Shop on account of the amount of blood spilt.

From 1962 until its closure in 2000, Eddie Johnson was landlord of the Two Puddings in Stratford and he started to change its reputation.

Eddie and wife Shirley were rock’n’roll fans and already from 1958 onwards had organised gig nights known as The Big Beat Club and The Devil’s Kitchen where in time The Who and The Kinks performed

The Puddings became a prime venue with the UK’s first disco. Coming along to the pub in the 1960s and beyond were television personalities, actors, writers, champion boxers, musicians, gangsters and footballers. Harry Redknapp met his wife there and David Essex made his performing debut at the Puddings.

At the end of the...
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JUNE
9
2021

 

Lombard Street, EC3V
Lombard Street has a history stretching back to medieval times. Lombard Street has its origins in one of the main Roman roads of London. It was so-named as it formed a plot of land granted by King Edward I (1272–1307) to goldsmiths from Lombardy.

In his diary of the 1660s, Samuel Pepys mentions "Lumbard street" many times.

The Royal Exchange was built in the street by Thomas Gresham. Lloyd’s Coffee House, which eventually became Lloyd’s of London, moved to Lombard Street from Tower Street in 1691.

From 1678 to 1829, the General Post Office had its headquarters on Lombard Street. The continuously expanding the post office site in the middle of the financial district eventually necessitated a move to St Martins-le-Grand.

Until the 1980s, most UK-based banks had their head offices in Lombard Street.

The street has a number of colourful signs hanging from the buildings, depicting historic organisations and buildings once located there. The signs were erected for the coronation of Edward VII in 1902.
»read full article


JUNE
8
2021

 

Oxhey Lane, WD19
Oxhey Lane is the oldest road in Carpenders Park. The road connected Oxhey and Hatch End. Midway along, Carpenders Park Farm was formerly the location of Braziers Dairy. Oxhey Lane was a narrow winding lane until widened in 1937.

Little Carpenders, along the lane, dates from around the 1860s and may have been the Estate Agent’s house for the ’Carpenders Estate’.

Before the South Oxhey (Carpenders Park) estate was built, the Oxhey Hall Estate was built in the 1930s in the lands to the west of Oxhey Lane as an example of "Metroland" architecture.

In the mid 1930s, Carpenders Park station was simply a halt for golfers using Oxhey Hall Golf Course. Bungalows and a few houses were built around it and Carpenders Avenue came into being; other roads spread out from it.

After the Second World War, South Oxhey Estate was built by London County Council between the railway line and Oxhey Woods. The land had formerly been part of the extensive Blackwells’ estate (of Crosse and Bl...
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JUNE
7
2021

 

Oliphant Street, W10
Oliphant Street was the final alphabetical street on the original Queen’s Park Estate naming scheme. The Manor and Parish of Chelsea owned an enclave - covering Kensal Town and Queen’s Park - until 1901 when it was divided between Kensington and Paddington. Kensal Town went to the former and the other side of the Harrow Road to the latter.

The north section was developed in 1875 by the Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company, who were the landlords until 1964. The north-south streets of their grid were numbered 1-6 and euphemistically entitled ’avenues’ : First, Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Avenues. The remaining streets were simply labelled A Street through to O Street.

Eight years later it was decided that even artisans and labourers deserved a little better. A became Alperton, after the Company’s brickyard in Middlesex, and was followed by Barfett, Caird, Droop (after H R. Droop, Artizans, Labourers & General Dwellings Company Director 1877-1883), Enbrook, Farrant (Sir Richard Farrant, Director 1877-1906), Galton (probably i...
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JUNE
6
2021

 

Turk’s Head
The Turk’s Head was one of two Wapping pubs of the same name. It was situated beside Union Stairs and had the grim task assigned to it of briefly hosting prisoners on their journey to Execution Dock. They would be allowed one quart of ale before departure.

Its address was 30 Wapping High Street (at number 326 on the same street before Victorian renumbering).

Its rather un-PC name derives from many such names coined during the Crusades. Any pub called ‘The Turk’s Head’ or ‘The Saracen’s Head’ is a reference to that period.

It had a dining room by 1940 but the pub was destroyed in the Blitz.
»read full article


JUNE
5
2021

 

Abbotsbury Road, W14
Abbotsbury Road runs between Melbury Road and the road known as Holland Park. Abbotsbury Road takes its name from one of the Dorset estates of the Earl of Ilchester. It is exclusively residential.

It is a wide tree-lined street and most houses have off street parking – some with their own garages. The road has humps in it to slow down the traffic. Traffic can go both ways. The south end is very close to the shops in Kensington High Street, and the north end to the shops in Holland Park Avenue. Holland Park itself is next to the road.

Work began in the early years of the 20th century, but only Nos. 3-9 odd, and 8-10 and 24-28 (even) were built before the Second World War.

During the 1960s houses and blocks were built on the west side of Abbotsbury Road. These include Abbotsbury House, a 10-storey block of flats, and Abbotsbury Close, a series of small crescents with houses and landscaped gardens, designed by Stone Toms and Partners and built by Wates Builders.

The brick houses are fairly uniform in...
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JUNE
4
2021

 

Victoria Embankment, EC4Y
Victoria Embankment is part of the Thames Embankment scheme of 19th-century civil engineering that reclaimed land next to the River Thames. The Victoria Embankment was primarily designed by Sir Joseph Bazalgette with architectural work on the embankment wall and river stairs by Charles Henry Driver. Started in 1862, it incorporates the main low level interceptor sewer and the underground District Line over which a wide road and riverside walkway were built. In total, Bazalgette’s scheme reclaimed 22 acres of land from the river. It prevented flooding, such as around what had been the remnants of Thorney Island (Westminster).

Much of the granite used in the projects was brought from Lamorna Cove in Cornwall.

The named named Victoria Embankment runs from the Houses of Parliament to Blackfriars Bridge. It incorporates gardens and open space collectively known as the Embankment Gardens.

Some parts of the Embankment were rebuilt in the 20th century due to wartime bomb damage or natural disasters such as the 1928 Thames flood.
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JUNE
3
2021

 

Carmelite Street, EC4Y
Carmelite Street continues south from Whitefriars Street, which itself is just off Fleet Street. Carmelite Street is a very narrow road and runs down a slope to its south end, where it meets the Victoria Embankment. Named in 1901, it commemorates the old foundation of the Carmelite or Whitefriars monastery here. Before 1901, it had been an extension of Whitefriars Street but was wharfland until the 1860s.

The street seems to have begun as an alley to serve ship berthings which by the 1860s had been repurposed to lead to the new Sir Joseph Bazalgette-designed Embankment.

The buildings which now stand on Carmelite Street were mostly constructed after the Second World War. There are also some very old buildings such as The Harrow, a public house said to have been frequented by Evening News reporters.

Founded by a City merchant, William Ward, in 1881, the City of London School for Girls opened in Carmelite Street in 1894 at a time when there was so little faith in academic education for girls that the building was designed so that it cou...
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JUNE
2
2021

 

Gloucester Road
Gloucester Road: Where Rumpole of the Bailey hung his hat. Gloucester Road - the street - runs north-south between Kensington Gardens (at which point it is known as Palace Gate) and the Old Brompton Road at the south end. At its intersection with Cromwell Road is Gloucester Road tube station, close to which there are several pubs, restaurants, many hotels and St. Stephen’s Church (built in 1867 and, notably, the church warden of which was the poet T. S. Eliot).

The road is named after Maria, Duchess of Gloucester and Edinburgh who built a house there in 1805. It was earlier called Hog Moore Lane (1612), that is ’lane through marshy ground where hogs are kept’, a name that was still used until about 1850.

Gloucester Road is the residence (25B Froxbury Court) of the fictional barrister Horace Rumpole of John Mortimer’s Rumpole of the Bailey series of short stories.

Gloucester Road underground station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms, opened in 1868 by the Metropolitan Railway as part of...
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JUNE
1
2021

 

Abbeville Road, SW4
Abbeville Road runs parallel to Clapham Common Southside, lying close to the line of Stane Street - the Roman military road from London to Chichester. The earliest settlement of Clapham was centred around present day North Street, Turret Grove and Rectory Grove. The land surrounding Clapham Common remained undeveloped and covered with farmland until the late 17th century, at which point the village began to expand towards the Common.

Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, large individual villas and houses lined Clapham Common Southside, set within extensive grounds - for example, The Clock House and Eagle House which can be seen on Stanford map of 1860. This land remained virtually undeveloped until 1875 when Clock House Farm was sold and the most southerly portion of Abbeville Road, close to the junction with Cavendish Road, was laid out.

Development along Abbeville Road and on its surrounding streets gathered pace during the last decades of the 19th century as more of the large mansions lining Clapham Common were demolished and their land sold off.

Locally Hambalt Road, Narbonne Av...
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