Albert Road, NW6

Road in/near Kilburn Park

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(51.53411 -0.20111) 

Albert Road, NW6

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · Kilburn Park · NW6 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Albert Road in NW6 escaped the mass renaming of Albert Roads in London.

Albert Road was such a popular name for 19th century streets that postal deliveries would often go astray - ending up at the wrong Albert Road address.

In 1937, it was decided that the Alberts, the Victorias, the Parks and the Princes should mostly be renamed as streets.

A few lucky Alberts, like this one in NW6, survived the cull.


Licence: Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike Licence



NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Beethoven Street School Beethoven Street School was opened in 1881 to serve the community of the newly-built Queen's Park Estate.
Kilburn Lane Farm A farm existed in Kilburn Lane until the 1860s, by which time it had been disrupted by the railway line.
Kilburn Park Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Lancefield Coachworks Lancefield Coachworks was a builder of bespoke bodies for expensive car chassis always introducing sporting elements into designs.
Queen’s Park Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.
Selby Square, W10 Selby Square is a walkway in the Queen’s Park Estate

NEARBY STREETS
Addison Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Algernon Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Alpha Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Beethoven Street, W10 Beethoven Street is a street in the Queen’s Park Estate.
Bradiston Road, W9 Bradiston Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Brondesbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Villas, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Terrace, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Works, NW6 Canterbury Works is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Cathedral Walk, NW6 Cathedral Walk is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Chichester Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Claremont Road, W10 Claremont Road is a road in the W10 postcode area
Claremont Road, W9 Claremont Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Dart Street, W10 Dart Street runs eastwards from Third Avenue and becomes Marban Road.
Denholme Road, W9 Denholme Road connects Fernhead Road with Saltram Crescent.
Denmark Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Donaldson Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dowland Street, W10 Dowland Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Dudley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gorefield Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Granville Road, NW6 Granville Road, NW6 was formerly Pembroke Road.
Hansel Road, NW6 Hansel Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Hartland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hazelmere Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Herries Street, W10 Herries Street is a street in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Honiton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hopefield Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kilburn Lane, NW6 Kilburn Lane is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Kilburn Lane, W9 Kilburn Lane is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilburn Park Road, NW6 Kilburn Park Road was built along the course of the Bayswater Rivulet (the River Westbourne), starting in 1855
Kingswood Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lonsdale Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lynton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mallard Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Malvern Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Marban Road, W9 Marban Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Masefield House, NW6 Residential block
Montrose Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Nelson Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Neville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Onslow Close, W10 Onslow Close is in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peel Precinct, NW6 Peel Precinct is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Pentland Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Princess Road, NW6 Princess Road was once known as Alexandra Road.
Rupert Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Saltram Crescent, W9 Saltram Crescent is a street in Maida Vale.
Salusbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Severn Avenue, W10 Severn Avenue is a newer thoroughfare in the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Stafford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Stansbury Square, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Summerfield Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Tolhurst Drive, W10 Tolhurst Drive is a street in the Queen's Park Estate
Verdi Crescent, W10 Verdi Crescent is a post-war development, lying off of Herries Street.
Victoria Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
William Dunbar House, NW6 Residential block
William Saville House, NW6 Residential block
Windermere Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Woodville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


Kilburn Park

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.

The area of Kilburn Park was developed in the 1850s somewhat south of the area then known as Kilburn in the fields west of the Edgware Road. The "Park" in the name was simply an invention by the developer, James Bailey.

Bailey had teamed up in a consortium of five developers who in 1850 bought 47 acres from owner the Reverend Edward Stuart. The consortium laid out roads and sewers and divided the site among themselves, subletting to smaller firms who built a few houses each.

The isolated, muddy location failed to attract many buyers and the estate remained incomplete for several decades. Properties were soon subdivided, some containing as many as six households in the 1870s.

The suburb of Kilburn Park was finally complete in the late 1880s.

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington  towards Queen’s Park.

The original plan had the London North West Railway (LNWR) creating a new line from Queen’s Park to Euston - but these underground ideas changed and a new "proper" line was built instead. But extending south from Queen’s Park gained momentum and, in 1911, it was mooted to extend the London Electric Railway (LER) company’s Bakerloo Line in that direction.

The Bakerloo Line offered a direct West End route without the need for changing trains though the Bakerloo was not the first option for bringing trains into the West End from the direction of Watford. A connection with the Hampstead Tube at Chalk Farm was looked at but not found to be feasible so the more expensive Bakerloo scheme then became the preferred route.

<img class="wp-image-85 size-medium" src="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/kilburnpark-209x300.jpg" alt="kilburnpark" width="209" height="300" /></a>

This arrangement suited the LER very well. It would capture a valuable new traffic and help fill the spare capacity along the existing line, and all at modest cost. It would also resolve once and for all how the Bakerloo should approach Paddington where the surface station layout was complicated. Vacillation about what to do after reaching Paddington had prevented the Bakerloo getting beyond Edgware Road as it was impossible to agree a route to Paddington without knowledge of where a future extension might go. Paddington was reached in 1913, with the GWR paying £18,000 towards the scheme.

Unfortunately, by the time work on the extension was well in hand, the Great War had broken out and this and other delays (including some very bad weather) somewhat disrupted plans. The Bakerloo service began on 31 January 1915, trains calling only at Warwick Avenue and Kilburn Park. Queens Park (though still incomplete) was sufficiently advanced to open on 11 February 1915, and Maida Vale was finally ready on 6 June 1915.

The Kilburn Park station building was designed by Stanley Heaps in a modified version of the earlier Leslie Green designed Bakerloo line stations with glazed terra cotta façades but without the large semi-circular windows at first floor level. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts. Because of the lack of lifts, there was no longer any need for an engine room, and the new station building was built as a single story building.

Maida Vale station, down the line was the first London station to have all-female staff. When it opened in 1915 during the First World War, there were two ticket collectors, two porters, two booking clerks, and relief ticket collector-booking clerks. Kilburn Park station was also staffed by women, though not exclusively so.

Because of the shortage of male workers, women’s role expanded  on the Bakerloo Line - first of all in stations like Maida Vale and Kilburn Park, but eventually on trains too. In August 1918 an unofficial strike, mainly affecting this line, played a part in moving towards equal pay for women.

<a href="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/178.png"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-86" src="http://theundergroundmap.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/178.png" alt="178" width="583" height="383" /></a>


LOCAL PHOTOS
Beethoven Street School
TUM image id: 1173
Beethoven Street, W10
TUM image id: 10299
Tolhurst Drive, W10
TUM image id: 10312
Severn Avenue, W10
TUM image id: 10313
Dart Street, W10
TUM image id: 10318
Dowland Street, W10
TUM image id: 10319
Herries Street, W10
TUM image id: 10332
Onslow Close, W10
TUM image id: 10345
Selby Square, W10
TUM image id: 10432
Lancefield Coachworks
TUM image id: 1499939772
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