Mallard Close, NW6

Road in/near Kilburn Park

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(51.53721 -0.19363) 

Mallard Close, NW6

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · Kilburn Park · NW6 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Street/road in London NW6




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Bayswater Rivulet The Bayswater Rivulet was the original name for the Westbourne River
Kilburn Bridge Kilburn Bridge once marked the spot where the Edgware Road crossed the River Westbourne.
Kilburn Bridge Farm Kilburn Bridge Farm stood beside Watling Street until the late 1830s.
Kilburn High Road What was Watling Street in earlier times, became Edgware Road and finally Kilburn High Road.
Kilburn House Kilburn House - a simple suburban villa - was notable in its role as a base for the growing WH Smith newsagent.
Kilburn Library Kilburn Library on Kilburn High Road is one of two sites called Kilburn Library, the other being in Salusbury Road, NW6.
Kilburn Park Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.
Kilburn Park Farm Kilburn Park Farm was situated almost opposite the Red Lion along the Edgware Road.
Kilburn Wells Kilburn Wells. a medicinal spring, existed between 1714 and the 1860s.
Red Lion The Red Lion was situated at 34 Kilburn High Road.
St Augustine’s Church of England High School St Augustine’s Church of England High School is a Voluntary Aided Church of England comprehensive school in the West London borough of Westminster, Kilburn.
The Elms The Elms - also known as Elm Lodge - stood at the junction of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane.
The Old Bell The (Old) Bell is a very old Kilburn Pub.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbey Road, NW6 A small section of the north of Abbey Road lies in NW6.
Abbots Place, NW6 Abbots Place runs from Priory Road to West End Lane and Abbey Road.
Addison Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Albert Road, NW6 Albert Road in NW6 escaped the mass renaming of Albert Roads in London.
Aldershot Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Alexandra Mews, NW8 Alexandra Mews existed between the 1850s and the 1960s.
Algernon Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Alpha Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Andover Place, NW6 Andover Place runs between Kilburn Park Road and Carlton Vale.
Andover Place, W9 Andover Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Belsise Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Birchington Road, NW6 Birchington Road runs from the Edgware Road to West End Lane.
Bolton Road, NW8 What is now Bolton Road began life as Ordnance Terrace in 1858.
Bransdale Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Villas, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cambridge Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Terrace, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Canterbury Works, NW6 Canterbury Works is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Cathedral Walk, NW6 Cathedral Walk is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Charteris Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Chichester Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Colas Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Coventry Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Daynor House, NW6 Residential block
Denmark Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dibdin House, W9 Residential block
Donaldson Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Douglas Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Emminster, NW8 The Abbey Road Housing Co-op development was built for Hampstead Borough Council in 1965.
Esmond Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Glengall Road, NW6 Glengall Road was laid out after Kilburn House was demolished.
Goldsmith Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gorefield Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greville Place, W9 Greville Place is a street in Maida Vale.
Greville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hazelmere Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hermit Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hillside Close, NW8 Hillside Close is a cul-de-sac off of Carlton Hill.
Holtham Road, NW8 Holtham Road disappeared when replaced by the Abbey Road Estate development.
Kenilworth Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn High Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kilburn Park Road, W9 Kilburn Park Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Kilburn Place, NW6 Kilburn Place was originally Providence Place.
Kilburn Priory, NW6 Kilburn Priory is now a road - - it was once the site of a real priory
Kilburn Priory, NW8 Kilburn Priory is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Kilburn Square, NW6 Kilburn Square was built around St Paul’s Chapel, which dates from 1825.
Kilburn Vale, NW6 Kilburn Vale leads to the Kilburn Vale estate.
Kingsgate Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Langtry Road, NW8 Langtry Road is a road in the NW8 postcode area
Langtry Walk, NW8 Langtry Walk was named for Lily Langtry.
Manor Mews, NW6 Manor Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Maple Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Mortimer Crescent is a notable street in Kilburn, full of literary connections.
Mortimer Crescent, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Mortimer Place, NW6 Mortimer Place can be found in Kilburn, NW6.
Mutrix Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Oxford Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plaza Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Princess Road, NW6 Princess Road was once known as Alexandra Road.
Priory Park Road, NW6 Priory Park Road dates from 1882.
Priory Terrace, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Prospect Place, NW6 Prospect Place was a group of houses built fronting Edgware Road south of the junction with West End Lane.
Quex Mews, NW6 Quex Mews is named after an estate in Kent.
Quex Road, NW6 Quex Road is an important road in NW6 linking the Edgware Road and West End Lane.
Randolph Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Regents Plaza, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rudolph Road, NW6 Rudolph Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Springfield Lane, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Springfield Walk, NW6 Springfield Walk has a set of very old steps that give access to Kilburn Priory.
St Julians Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
The Terrace, NW6 The Terrace is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Torridon House, NW6 Residential block
Victoria Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Victoria Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Wells Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Willesden Court, S43 This is a street in the S43 postcode area
Woodville Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6


Kilburn Park

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington.

The area of Kilburn Park was developed in the 1850s somewhat south of the area then known as Kilburn in the fields west of the Edgware Road. The "Park" in the name was simply an invention by the developer, James Bailey.

Bailey had teamed up in a consortium of five developers who in 1850 bought 47 acres from owner the Reverend Edward Stuart. The consortium laid out roads and sewers and divided the site among themselves, subletting to smaller firms who built a few houses each.

The isolated, muddy location failed to attract many buyers and the estate remained incomplete for several decades. Properties were soon subdivided, some containing as many as six households in the 1870s.

The suburb of Kilburn Park was finally complete in the late 1880s.

Kilburn Park station was opened on 31 January 1915 as the temporary terminus of the Bakerloo line’s extension from Paddington  towards Queen’s Park.

The original plan had the London North West Railway (LNWR) creating a new line from Queen’s Park to Euston - but these underground ideas changed and a new "proper" line was built instead. But extending south from Queen’s Park gained momentum and, in 1911, it was mooted to extend the London Electric Railway (LER) company’s Bakerloo Line in that direction.

The Bakerloo Line offered a direct West End route without the need for changing trains though the Bakerloo was not the first option for bringing trains into the West End from the direction of Watford. A connection with the Hampstead Tube at Chalk Farm was looked at but not found to be feasible so the more expensive Bakerloo scheme then became the preferred route.

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This arrangement suited the LER very well. It would capture a valuable new traffic and help fill the spare capacity along the existing line, and all at modest cost. It would also resolve once and for all how the Bakerloo should approach Paddington where the surface station layout was complicated. Vacillation about what to do after reaching Paddington had prevented the Bakerloo getting beyond Edgware Road as it was impossible to agree a route to Paddington without knowledge of where a future extension might go. Paddington was reached in 1913, with the GWR paying £18,000 towards the scheme.

Unfortunately, by the time work on the extension was well in hand, the Great War had broken out and this and other delays (including some very bad weather) somewhat disrupted plans. The Bakerloo service began on 31 January 1915, trains calling only at Warwick Avenue and Kilburn Park. Queens Park (though still incomplete) was sufficiently advanced to open on 11 February 1915, and Maida Vale was finally ready on 6 June 1915.

The Kilburn Park station building was designed by Stanley Heaps in a modified version of the earlier Leslie Green designed Bakerloo line stations with glazed terra cotta façades but without the large semi-circular windows at first floor level. It was one of the first London Underground stations built specifically to use escalators rather than lifts. Because of the lack of lifts, there was no longer any need for an engine room, and the new station building was built as a single story building.

Maida Vale station, down the line was the first London station to have all-female staff. When it opened in 1915 during the First World War, there were two ticket collectors, two porters, two booking clerks, and relief ticket collector-booking clerks. Kilburn Park station was also staffed by women, though not exclusively so.

Because of the shortage of male workers, women’s role expanded  on the Bakerloo Line - first of all in stations like Maida Vale and Kilburn Park, but eventually on trains too. In August 1918 an unofficial strike, mainly affecting this line, played a part in moving towards equal pay for women.

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LOCAL PHOTOS
Kilburn Wells
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Kilburn Park Farm
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Mortimer Place, NW6
TUM image id: 1492961898
Kilburn House
Credit: Brent Archives
TUM image id: 1602685827
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