Palmerston Road, NW6

Road in/near Kilburn

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.54476 -0.19923, 51.544 -0.199) 

Palmerston Road, NW6

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · Kilburn · NW6 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Street/road in London NW6




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Kilburn Grange Park Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Oaklands Hall On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
The Elms The Elms - also known as Elm Lodge - stood at the junction of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane.
The Grange The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.
Victoria Tavern The Victoria Tavern was built on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane in the middle of the nineteenth century.
West End House West End House, once in open countryside, became surrounded by railways.
West End Park West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Mews, NW6 Albion Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Ariel Road, NW6 Ariel Road was formed from the 1885 combination of Ariel Street and Spencer Terrace.
Athelstan Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Barlow Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brooklands Court, NW6 Brooklands Court is a road in the NW6 postcode area
Buckley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Burton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Callcott Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cavendish Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cavendish Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Clarence Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cotleigh Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Douglas Court, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Drakes Courtyard, NW6 Drakes Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Dunster Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dyne Road, NW6 Dyne Road dates from the just after the opening of Kilburn Station in 1879.
Dynham Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Eresby Road, NW6 Eresby Road ran from Kingsgate Road to Kilburn High Road with a turning for Kingsgate Place about halfway down.
Exeter Parade, NW2 Exeter Parade is a street in Cricklewood.
Exeter Road, NW6 Exeter Road is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Garlinge Road, NW6 Garlinge Road connects Shoot Up Hill with Fordwych Road.
Gascony Avenue, NW6 Gascony Avenue is an east-west road lying both sides of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Gladstone Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Gladys Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grange Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grangeway, NW6 Grangeway, NW6 lies off of Messina Avenue.
Hemstal Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hilltop Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Iverson Road, NW6 The first part of Iverson Road, NW6 was laid out in 1872.
Kimberley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kings Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Road, NW6 Kingsgate Road runs between Quex Road and Hemstal Road.
Kingsley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kylemore Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Landau House, NW2 Residential block
Liddell Road, NW6 Liddell Road was named after an old West Hampstead estate.
Linburn House, NW6 Residential block
Lincoln Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Linstead Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Loveridge Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Loveridge Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lowfield Road, NW6 Lowfield Road is the northern extension of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Maygrove Road, NW6 Maygrove Road runs between the Edgware Road and Iverson Road, NW6
Mazenod Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Medley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Messina Avenue, NW6 Messina Avenue stretches from West End Lane over to Kilburn High Road.
Netherwood Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plympton Avenue, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Plympton Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rowntree Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sherriff Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Showing every road so far featured, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Smyrna Road, NW6 Smyrna Road is a small road to the west of West End Lane.
Streatley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
The Arches, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Torbay Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Waterloo Passage, NW6 Waterloo Passage is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
West End Lane, NW6 West End Lane is the main road running through West Hampstead.
Willesden Court, S43 This is a street in the S43 postcode area


Kilburn

Kilburn is an area which straddles both sides of the Edgware Road (Kilburn High Road).

Kilburn High Road originated as an ancient trackway, part of a Celtic route between the settlements now known as Canterbury and St Albans. Under Roman rule, the route was paved. In Anglo-Saxon times the road became known as Watling Street.

Kilburn grew up on the banks of a stream which has been known variously as Cuneburna, Kelebourne and Cyebourne, which flows from Hampstead down through Hyde Park and into the River Thames. It is suggested the name means either Royal River or Cattle River ('Bourne' being an Anglo-Saxon word for 'river'). That river is known today as the Westbourne.

The name Kilburn was first recorded in 1134 as Cuneburna, referring to the priory which had been built on the site of the cell of a hermit known as Godwyn. Godwyn had built his hermitage by the Kilburn river during the reign of Henry I, and both his hermitage and the priory took their name from the river.

Kilburn Priory was a small community of nuns, probably Augustinian canonesses. It was founded in 1134 at the Kilburn river crossing on Watling Street (the modern-day junction of Kilburn High Road and Belsize Road). Kilburn Priory's position on Watling Street meant that it became a popular resting point for pilgrims heading for the shrines at St Albans and Willesden. The Priory was dissolved in 1536-37 by Henry VIII, and nothing remains of it today. The priory lands included a mansion and a hostium (a guesthouse), which may have been the origin of the Red Lion pub, thought to have been founded in 1444. Opposite, the Bell Inn was opened around 1600, on the site of the old mansion.

The fashion for taking 'medicinal waters' in the 18th century came to Kilburn when a well of chalybeate waters (water impregnated with iron) was discovered near the Bell Inn in 1714. In an attempt to compete with the nearby Hampstead Well, gardens and a 'great room' were opened to promote the well, and its waters were promoted in journals of the day as cure for 'stomach ailments'.

In the 19th century the wells declined, but the Kilburn Wells remained popular as a tea garden. The Bell was demolished and rebuilt in 1863. The Kilburn stretch of Watling Street, now called Edgware Road and Kilburn High Road, was gradually built up with inns and farm houses. Kilburn did not attract any significant building until around 1819 in the area near St John's Wood.

Much of the area was developed in the last decades of the 19th century by Solomon Barnett, who named many of the streets after places in the West Country (e.g. Torbay) or after popular poets of the day (e.g. Tennyson) in honour of his wife.

There are three railway stations on Kilburn High Road: Kilburn tube station (Jubilee line) at its northern end and a little to the south Brondesbury station (London Overground). Approximately a mile further south is Kilburn High Road station (also London Overground). The name of Ian Dury's first band, Kilburn and the High Roads, refers to this road, as does the Flogging Molly song, "Kilburn High Road" and the Shack song, "Kilburn High Road".

Kilburn tube station opened as Kilburn and Brondesbury on 24 November 1879, as part of the Metropolitan and St. John's Wood Railway run by the Metropolitan Railway. Following the merger of the Metropolitan Railway into London Transport in 1933, it then became part of the Stanmore branch of the Bakerloo line on 20 November 1939, at which time the station was extensively rebuilt. The station was renamed to its current name on 25 September 1950. It was transferred to the Jubilee line on its opening, on 1 May 1979.


LOCAL PHOTOS
West Hampstead Overgound
TUM image id: 1127
West End Park, 1870s
TUM image id: 1135
Maygrove Peace Park
TUM image id: 1152
Grangeway, NW6
TUM image id: 1453361516
201402160103
TUM image id: 1453363351
Extract from the London Gazette
TUM image id: 1556827514
Print-friendly version of this page