West End Lane, NW6

Road in/near West Hampstead, existing between 1525 and now

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(51.54524 -0.19163, 51.545 -0.191) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · NW6 ·
MAY
10
2015

West End Lane is the main road running through West Hampstead.

West End Lane is one of West Hampstead's oldest roads. It was already named West End Lane by 1644. West End Lane and Mill Lane (Shoot Up Hill Lane and Cole Lane), probably existed as access in the Middle Ages since they formed the boundaries of several ancient estates.

It is bent at a right-angle at the north and south ends where it connects to Finchley Road and Edgware Road respectively. It is possible to trace most of West End Lane’s bends and twists from the earliest maps on the modern street plan.

As late as the 1860s it was still a true country lane with high banks, "hedged irregularly for the greater part of its length, and enshrined too by the embracing branches of the majestic oak, elm and other forest trees, through which a sunny gleam here and there broke." according to Dick Weindling and Marianne Colloms in Kilburn and West Hampstead Past.

West End Lane led westwards from Hampstead and then southwards to Kilburn. Where it took this sharp turn from running west to running south, a hamlet grew up. The hamlet was originally known as "le Rudyng" (indicating a woodland clearing) in the mid-13th century, but by 1534 came to be called West End. It was then a freehold estate belonging to Kilburn Priory, and was so called because it was at the west end of another, larger estate.

By the early 17th century a number of houses were present, and by the middle of that century London merchants were building larger houses in the area, so turning a hamlet into the village of West End.

At the beginning of the 19th century, there were three main large houses around the hamlet of West End: West End House, West End Hall and Lauriston Lodge which were later sold off for redevelopment with the arrival of the railways, which led to the transformation of the area from farmland into housing estates.

In 1879, the Metropolitan Railway adopted the name West Hampstead for its station on West End Lane. Three railway stations were built by three different companies along the length of the road.

With the coming of the railways and of housing, West End Lane became the major shopping street for which it is known to this day.




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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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Comment
The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

Reply

James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply

Dave Fahey   
Added: 6 Jan 2021 02:40 GMT   

Bombing of the Jack O Newberry
My maternal grandfather, Archie Greatorex, was the licensee of the Earl of Warwick during the Second World War. My late mother Vera often told the story of the bombing of the Jack. The morning after the pub was bombed, the landlord’s son appeared at the Warwick with the pub’s till on an old pram; he asked my grandfather to pay the money into the bank for him. The poor soul was obviously in shock. The previous night, his parents had taken their baby down to the pub cellar to shelter from the air raids. The son, my mother never knew his name, opted to stay in his bedroom at the top of the building. He was the only survivor. I often wondered what became of him.

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Comment
Graham Margetson   
Added: 9 Feb 2021 14:33 GMT   

I lived at 4 Arkwright Road before it was the school
My parents lived at 4 Arkwright Road. Mrs Goodwin actually owned the house and my parents rented rooms from her.


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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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Reply
The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

Reply
Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

Reply
Lived here
Cassandra Green   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 14:34 GMT   

Rudall Crescent, NW3 (- 1999)
I lived at 2 Rudall Crescent until myself and my family moved out in 1999. I once met a lady in a art fair up the road who was selling old photos of the area and was very knowledgeable about the area history, collecting photos over the years. She told me that before the current houses were built, there was a large manor house , enclosed by a large area of land. She told me there had been a fire there. Im trying to piece together the story and find out what was on the land before the crescent was built. This website is very interesting.

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 15:38 GMT   

6 East Row (1960 - 1960)
We lived at 6 East Row just before it was demolished.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Decca Studios Decca Studios was a recording facility in Broadhurst Gardens.
Jacksfield Jacksfield was one of the smaller but well-documented copyhold estates in the West Hampstead area.
Kilburn Grange Park Kilburn Grange Park is a three hectare open space adjacent to Kilburn High Road.
Oaklands Hall On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
Sandwell House Sandwell House was owned by three generations of the Wachter family.
The Grange The Grange was a large mansion situated on Kilburn High Road until the turn of the twentieth century.
The Railway The Railway pub is a standard Victorian pub with a musical secret.
Victoria Hotel The Victoria Tavern was built on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane in the middle of the nineteenth century.
West End House West End House, once in open countryside, became surrounded by railways.
West End Park West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'.

NEARBY STREETS
Aberdare Gardens, NW6 This late Victorian street was probably named in compliment to Henry Bruce, Home Secretary 1868-1873, who was created 1st Baron Aberdare.
Acol Road, NW6 Acol is not an acronym, but a village in Kent that gave its name to Acol Road, NW6.
Albion Mews, NW6 Albion Mews is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Ariel Road, NW6 Ariel Road was formed from the 1885 combination of Ariel Street and Spencer Terrace.
Banister Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Billy Fury Way, NW3 Billy Fury Way is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Blackburn Road, NW6 Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.
Broadhurst. Gardens, NW6 Broadhurst. Gardens is a location in London.
Broadwell Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Brondesbury Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Campagne Gardens, NW6 Campagne Gardens is a location in London.
Canfield Road, NW6 Canfield Road is a location in London.
Cleve Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Compagne Gardens, NW6 Compagne Gardens is a location in London.
Compayne Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cotleigh Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Crown Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Doulton Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dynham Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Eresby Road, NW6 Eresby Road ran from Kingsgate Road to Kilburn High Road with a turning for Kingsgate Place about halfway down.
Gascony Avenue, NW6 Gascony Avenue is an east-west road lying both sides of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Gladys Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grange Place, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Grangeway, NW6 Grangeway, NW6 lies off of Messina Avenue.
Greencroft Avenue, NW6 Greencroft Avenue is a location in London.
Hemstal Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Heritage Lane, NW6 Heritage Lane is a location in London.
Highfield Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hilltop Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Iverson Road, NW6 The first part of Iverson Road, NW6 was laid out in 1872.
Kings Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Kingsgate Road, NW6 Kingsgate Road runs between Quex Road and Hemstal Road.
Kylemore Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Liddell Road, NW6 Liddell Road was named after an old West Hampstead estate.
Linstead Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lowfield Road, NW6 Lowfield Road is the northern extension of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Maygrove Road, NW6 Maygrove Road runs between the Edgware Road and Iverson Road, NW6
Medley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Messina Avenue, NW6 Messina Avenue stretches from West End Lane over to Kilburn High Road.
Netherwood Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Palmerston Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Priory Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Queensgate Place, NW6 Queensgate Place is a location in London.
Rowntree Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sheriff Road, NW6 Sheriff Road is a location in London.
Sherrif Road, NW6 Sherrif Road is a location in London.
Sherriff Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Smyma Road, NW6 Smyma Road is a location in London.
Smyrna Road, NW6 Smyrna Road is a small road to the west of West End Lane.
St Marys Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Waterloo Passage, NW6 Waterloo Passage is one of the streets of London in the NW6 postal area.
Wavel Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Webheath, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
West Hampstead Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Westend Lane, NW6 Westend Lane is a location in London.
Woodchurch Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6

NEARBY PUBS
Acol Bridge Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Done Our Bit Club Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kingdom This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Railway The Railway pub is a standard Victorian pub with a musical secret.
The Railway This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Victoria Hotel The Victoria Tavern was built on the corner of Kilburn High Road and Willesden Lane in the middle of the nineteenth century.


West Hampstead

The name "West Hampstead" was a 19th century invention - the original name was West End.

Lacking its own supply of spring water and situated away from the main roads, medieval West End barely qualified as a hamlet until a few country houses were built here from the 17th century onwards. The tendency for West End Lane to become impassably muddy after heavy rain further enhanced the hamlet's isolation.

By 1815 West End was still excep­tionally quiet – so much so that its inhab­itants claimed to have heard the cannon fire at Waterloo. The construction of the Finchley Road in the 1830s brought few additions to a population that consisted of a handful of squires and some farm labourers, gardeners and craftsmen. By 1851 West End had one inn and two beershops.

Railways were the prime stimulus of growth in many country corners of modern London but few places were trans­formed as wholly as West End. With the arrival of the Hampstead Junction Railway in 1857, the Midland Railway in 1868 and the Metro­politan and St John’s Wood Railway in 1879, the new suburb of West Hampstead spread in all directions.

Rapid development in the 1880s and 1890s swept away the large houses and the streets were laid out in today's pattern. A local estate agent in Kilburn claimed that he coined the name ‘West Hampstead’, for one of the local railway stations. Public amenities such as street lighting, gas and electricity were provided and much of the frontage to West End Lane was developed as shops.

Some of the new estates were the work of big developers like the United Land Company, whose inclination was to build fairly densely, and during the latter decades of the 19th century parts of West Hampstead became increasingly working-class in character, with policeman, travelling salesmen and railwaymen mixing with clerks and artisans. Engin­eering workshops operated near the railway lines.

Twentieth-century building was limited mainly to interwar blocks of flats in the north of the district, often in place of Victorian houses that had already become run-down.

The West Hampstead ward now has relatively few families and a great number of young single people. A large proportion of homes are privately rented and fewer than a quarter of adults are married, compared with more than half for the country as a whole. This socio-economic profile is evident in the upmarket cafés that have lined West End Lane in recent years.

Famous West Hampstead residents have included the singers Dusty Springfield, Joan Armat­rading, Olivia Newton John and Jimmy Somerville, author Doris Lessing, actresses Imelda Staunton and Emma Thompson, and the playwright Joe Orton, who lived on West End Lane with his lover Kenneth Halliwell from 1951 to 1959. Stephen Fry has also lived here.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Wet Fish Cafe
Credit: Wet Fish Cafe
TUM image id: 1556889785
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Meadowland with buttercups and daisies
TUM image id: 1483540144
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Alice House
TUM image id: 1557142437
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Black Lion (early 1900s)
TUM image id: 1557151939
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Victorian art work
TUM image id: 1557403841
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fortune Green
TUM image id: 1557159356
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Eustace Hamilton Miles
TUM image id: 1557162230
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kilburn Grange Park
TUM image id: 1453363351
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Extract from the London Gazette
Credit: The London Gazette
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Wet Fish Cafe
Credit: Wet Fish Cafe
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The Alice House
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The Black Lion (early 1900s)
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Victorian art work
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Eustace Hamilton Miles
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Kilburn Grange Park
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Houses in Dennington Park Road
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Built in the period immediately following the First World War, Grangeway NW6 is tucked into a corner of Kilburn Grange Park.
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Honeybourne Road is a road in West Hampstead. It is known locally for its rare Edward VII postbox near its junction with West End Lane.
Credit: Geograph/Mike Quinn
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