West Hampstead Mews, NW6

Road in/near West Hampstead

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(51.5462 -0.18979, 51.546 -0.189) 
MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · West Hampstead · NW6 ·
JANUARY
1
2015

Street/road in London NW6




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:30 GMT   

Kilburn Park - opened 1915
Kilburn Park station was opened at the height of the First World War

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 14:49 GMT   

A bit of a lift....
Kilburn Park was the first station to be designed around escalators, rather than lifts.

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James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

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Graham Margetson   
Added: 9 Feb 2021 14:33 GMT   

I lived at 4 Arkwright Road before it was the school
My parents lived at 4 Arkwright Road. Mrs Goodwin actually owned the house and my parents rented rooms from her.


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Comment
GRaleigh   
Added: 23 Feb 2021 09:34 GMT   

Found a bug
Hi all! Thank you for your excellent site. I found an overlay bug on the junction of Glengall Road, NW6 and Hazelmere Road, NW6 on the 1950 map only. It appears when one zooms in at this junction and only on the zoom.

Cheers,
Geoff Raleigh

Source: Glengall Road, NW6

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The Underground Map   
Added: 25 Feb 2021 13:11 GMT   

Glengall Road, NW6
Thanks Geoff!

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Lived here
Brenda Jackson   
Added: 13 Aug 2017 21:39 GMT   

83 Pembroke Road
My Gt Gt grandparents lived at 83 Pembroke Road before it became Granville Road, They were married in 1874, John Tarrant and Maryann Tarrant nee Williamson.

Her brother George Samuel Williamson lived at 95 Pembroke Road with his wife Emily and children in the 1881 Census

Apparently the extended family also lived for many years in Alpha Place, Canterbury Road, Peel Road,

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:13 GMT   

St Jude’s Church, Lancefield Street
Saint Jude’s was constructed in 1878, while the parish was assigned in 1879 from the parish of Saint John, Kensal Green (P87/JNE2). The parish was united with the parishes of Saint Luke (P87/LUK1) and Saint Simon (P87/SIM) in 1952. The church was used as a chapel of ease for a few years, but in 1959 it was closed and later demolished.

The church is visible on the 1900 map for the street on the right hand side above the junction with Mozart Street.

Source: SAINT JUDE, KENSAL GREEN: LANCEFIELD STREET, WESTMINSTER | Londo

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Fumblina   
Added: 27 Mar 2021 11:08 GMT   

Wedding at St Jude’s Church
On 9th November 1884 Charles Selby and Johanna Hanlon got married in St Jude’s Church on Lancefield Street. They lived together close by at 103 Lancefield Street.
Charles was a Lather, so worked in construction. He was only 21 but was already a widower.
Johanna is not shown as having a profession but this is common in the records and elsewhere she is shown as being an Ironer or a Laundress. It is possible that she worked at the large laundry shown at the top of Lancefield Road on the 1900 map. She was also 21. She was not literate as her signature on the record is a cross.
The ceremony was carried out by William Hugh Wood and was witnessed by Charles H Hudson and Caroline Hudson.

Source: https://www.ancestry.co.uk/imageviewer/collections/1623/images/31280_197456-00100?pId=6694792

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Lived here
Cassandra Green   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 14:34 GMT   

Rudall Crescent, NW3 (- 1999)
I lived at 2 Rudall Crescent until myself and my family moved out in 1999. I once met a lady in a art fair up the road who was selling old photos of the area and was very knowledgeable about the area history, collecting photos over the years. She told me that before the current houses were built, there was a large manor house , enclosed by a large area of land. She told me there had been a fire there. Im trying to piece together the story and find out what was on the land before the crescent was built. This website is very interesting.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT



   
Added: 4 May 2021 19:45 GMT   

V1 Attack
The site of a V1 incident in 1944

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David Gibbs   
Added: 3 May 2021 16:48 GMT   

73 Bus Crash in Albion Rd 1961
From a Newspaper cutting of which I have a copy with photo. On Tuesday August 15th 1961 a 73 bus destined for Mortlake at 8.10am. The bus had just turned into Albion Road when the driver passed out, apparently due to a heart attack, and crashed into a wall on the western side of Albion Road outside No 207. The bus driver, George Jefferies aged 56 of Observatory Road, East Sheen, died after being trapped in his cab when he collided with a parked car. Passengers on the bus were thrown from their seats as it swerved. Several fainted, and ambulances were called. The bus crashed into a front garden and became jammed against a wall. The car driver, who had just parked, suffered shock.

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Richard Eades   
Added: 3 May 2021 11:42 GMT   

Downsell Primary School (1955 - 1958)
I was a pupil at Downsell road from I think 1955 age 7 until I left in 1958 age 10 having passed my "11plus" and won a scholarship to Parmiters school in bethnal green. I remember my class teacher was miss Lynn and the deputy head was mrs Kirby.
At the time we had an annual sports day for the whole school in july at drapers field, and trolley buses ran along the high street and there was a turning point for them just above the junction with downsell road.
I used to go swimming at cathall road baths, and also at the bakers arms baths where we had our school swimming galas. I nm y last year, my class was taken on a trip to the tower of london just before the end of term. I would love to hear from any pupils who remember me.

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Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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James Preston   
Added: 28 Apr 2021 09:06 GMT   

School
Was this the location of Rosslyn House prep school? I have a photograph of the Rosslyn House cricket team dated 1910 which features my grandfather (Alan Westbury Preston). He would have been 12 years old at the time. All the boys on the photo have been named. If this is the location of the school then it appears that the date of demolition is incorrect.

Reply
Comment
Tricia   
Added: 27 Apr 2021 12:05 GMT   

St George in the East Church
This Church was opened in 1729, designed by Hawksmore. Inside destroyed by incendrie bomb 16th April 1941. Rebuilt inside and finished in 1964. The building remained open most of the time in a temporary prefab.

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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Josh   
Added: 18 Apr 2021 21:00 GMT   

Winchfield House, SW15
Designed 1952-53. Constructed 1955-58

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Cannon Stream The Cannon Stream was, before it was sent underground, a tributary of the Westbourne River.
Canterbury House In the last half of the nineteenth century, a white house called Canterbury was built on the then southern fringes of West End.
Decca Studios Decca Studios was a recording facility in Broadhurst Gardens.
Hampstead Cricket Club Hampstead Cricket Club moved to its Lymington Road site in 1877.
Jacksfield Jacksfield was one of the smaller but well-documented copyhold estates in the West Hampstead area.
Lauriston Lodge Lauriston Lodge, now the site of Dene Mansions, was a large house in West Hampstead.
Oaklands Hall On the west side of West End Lane, Charles Spain bought 5 acres and between 1829 and 1838 built York Villa.
Sandwell House Sandwell House was owned by three generations of the Wachter family.
The Railway The Railway pub is a standard Victorian pub with a musical secret.
Treherne House Treherne House was built in the mid eighteenth century,
West End House West End House, once in open countryside, became surrounded by railways.
West End Park West End Park was created from fields known as the 'Little Estate'.
Westbourne Pond Westbourne Pond is marked on the 1830 Greenwood map as the source of the Westbourne River.

NEARBY STREETS
Banister Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Beswick Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Billy Fury Way, NW3 Billy Fury Way is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Blackburn Road, NW6 Blackburn Road is a cul-de-sac off of West End Lane.
Broadhurst Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Broadhurst Gardens, NW6 Broadhurst Gardens is in West Hampstead, NW6
Broadhurst. Gardens, NW6 Broadhurst. Gardens is a location in London.
Broadwell Parade, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Campagne Gardens, NW6 Campagne Gardens is a location in London.
Canfield Gardens, NW6 Canfield Gardens was first laid out in 1881.
Canfield Road, NW6 Canfield Road is a location in London.
Cleve Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Compagne Gardens, NW6 Compagne Gardens is a location in London.
Compayne Gardens, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Cotleigh Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Crown Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dennington Park Road, NW6 About 1881 Dennington Park Road was constructed on the line of Sweetbriar Walk, the old path to Lauriston Lodge.
Doulton Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Dynham Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Fairhazel Gardens, NW6 Fairhazel Gardens runs from Broadhurst Gardens to Goldhurst Terrace.
Fawley Road, NW6 Fawley Road connects West End Lane with Crediton Hill.
Gascony Avenue, NW6 Gascony Avenue is an east-west road lying both sides of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Gladys Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Greencroft Avenue, NW6 Greencroft Avenue is a location in London.
Greencroft Gardens, NW6 Greencroft Gardens dates from 1884-5.
Hemstal Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Heritage Lane, NW6 Heritage Lane is a location in London.
Highfield Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Hilltop Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Iverson Road, NW6 The first part of Iverson Road, NW6 was laid out in 1872.
Kingdon Road, NW6 Kingdon Road connects Sumatra Road and Dennington Park Road.
Kylemore Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Liddell Road, NW6 Liddell Road was named after an old West Hampstead estate.
Linstead Street, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Lithos Road, NW3 Lithos Road is a part of the NW3 postal area which lies west of the Finchley Road.
Lowfield Road, NW6 Lowfield Road is the northern extension of Kingsgate Road, NW6.
Lymington Road, NW6 Lymington Road is a street in London NW6
Maygrove Road, NW6 Maygrove Road runs between the Edgware Road and Iverson Road, NW6
Medley Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Messina Avenue, NW6 Messina Avenue stretches from West End Lane over to Kilburn High Road.
Minton Mews, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Pandora Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Petros Gardens, NW3 Petros Gardens is a location in London.
PO Box 4, NW6 Worcester Mews is a location in London.
Priory Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Rosemont Road, NW3 Rosemont Road is a street in Hampstead.
Rowntree Close, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sandwell Crescent, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sheriff Road, NW6 Sheriff Road is a location in London.
Sherrif Road, NW6 Sherrif Road is a location in London.
Sherriff Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Smyma Road, NW6 Smyma Road is a location in London.
Solent Road, NW6 Solent Road is a street in West Hampstead.
Spode Walk, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Sumatra Road, NW6 Sumatra Road, NW6 dates from the 1870s.
West End Lane, NW6 West End Lane is the main road running through West Hampstead.
Westend Lane, NW6 Westend Lane is a location in London.
Woodchurch Road, NW6 Street/road in London NW6
Worcester Mews, NW3 Street/road in London NW6


West Hampstead

The name "West Hampstead" was a 19th century invention - the original name was West End.

Lacking its own supply of spring water and situated away from the main roads, medieval West End barely qualified as a hamlet until a few country houses were built here from the 17th century onwards. The tendency for West End Lane to become impassably muddy after heavy rain further enhanced the hamlet's isolation.

By 1815 West End was still excep­tionally quiet – so much so that its inhab­itants claimed to have heard the cannon fire at Waterloo. The construction of the Finchley Road in the 1830s brought few additions to a population that consisted of a handful of squires and some farm labourers, gardeners and craftsmen. By 1851 West End had one inn and two beershops.

Railways were the prime stimulus of growth in many country corners of modern London but few places were trans­formed as wholly as West End. With the arrival of the Hampstead Junction Railway in 1857, the Midland Railway in 1868 and the Metro­politan and St John’s Wood Railway in 1879, the new suburb of West Hampstead spread in all directions.

Rapid development in the 1880s and 1890s swept away the large houses and the streets were laid out in today's pattern. A local estate agent in Kilburn claimed that he coined the name ‘West Hampstead’, for one of the local railway stations. Public amenities such as street lighting, gas and electricity were provided and much of the frontage to West End Lane was developed as shops.

Some of the new estates were the work of big developers like the United Land Company, whose inclination was to build fairly densely, and during the latter decades of the 19th century parts of West Hampstead became increasingly working-class in character, with policeman, travelling salesmen and railwaymen mixing with clerks and artisans. Engin­eering workshops operated near the railway lines.

Twentieth-century building was limited mainly to interwar blocks of flats in the north of the district, often in place of Victorian houses that had already become run-down.

The West Hampstead ward now has relatively few families and a great number of young single people. A large proportion of homes are privately rented and fewer than a quarter of adults are married, compared with more than half for the country as a whole. This socio-economic profile is evident in the upmarket cafés that have lined West End Lane in recent years.

Famous West Hampstead residents have included the singers Dusty Springfield, Joan Armat­rading, Olivia Newton John and Jimmy Somerville, author Doris Lessing, actresses Imelda Staunton and Emma Thompson, and the playwright Joe Orton, who lived on West End Lane with his lover Kenneth Halliwell from 1951 to 1959. Stephen Fry has also lived here.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Extract from the London Gazette
TUM image id: 1556827514
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Victorian house under construction
TUM image id: 1483541885
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Wet Fish Cafe
Credit: Wet Fish Cafe
TUM image id: 1556889785
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Meadowland with buttercups and daisies
TUM image id: 1483540144
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The Alice House
TUM image id: 1557142437
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The Black Lion (early 1900s)
TUM image id: 1557151939
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Victorian art work
TUM image id: 1557403841
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Fortune Green
TUM image id: 1557159356
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Eustace Hamilton Miles
TUM image id: 1557162230
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Kilburn Grange Park
TUM image id: 1453363351
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Extract from the London Gazette
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Wet Fish Cafe
Credit: Wet Fish Cafe
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Meadowland with buttercups and daisies
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The Alice House
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The Black Lion (early 1900s)
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Victorian art work
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Eustace Hamilton Miles
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Broadhurst Gardens in West Hampstead, photographed here in 2009, was home to Decca Studios. From the late 1870s building had spread on Spencer Maryon Wilson’s lands. Near the Metropolitan railway line was Broadhurst Gardens, where 116 houses were built between 1882 and 1894.
Credit: Geograph/Christine Matthews
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Cannon Hill is in the Fortune Green area of West Hampstead. EJ Cave, one of the district’s most prominent Victorian builders, built the Cannon Hill estate where Marlborough, Buckingham and Avenue Mansions were built in the triangle formed by Cannon Hill, Finchley Road, and West End Lane in 1896-1900.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Houses in Dennington Park Road
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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