Harrow Road, W10

Road in/near Kensal Town, existing until now

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(51.52697 -0.21139) 

Harrow Road, W10

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Road · * · W10 ·
December
1
2017

Harrow Road is a main road through London W10.


Harrow Road is an ancient route which runs from Paddington in a northwesterly direction towards Harrow. It is also the name given to the immediate surrounding area of Queens Park and Kensal Green, straddling the NW10, W10 and W9 postcodes. With minor deviations in the 19th and 20th centuries, the route remains otherwise unaltered. There are dozens of other existing roads throughout the United Kingdom using the same name which do not lead to or from Harrow but merely use the name of the town or, in some cases, a person of that name.

Before urbanisation the entire road was known as the "Harrow Road" but, as various local authorities came into existence and imposed independent numbering schemes and more localised descriptions on the parts of the road within their respective boundaries, the principal name was replaced in a number of places along its course.

Starting at the junction of Harrow Road and Edgware Road at Paddington Green, Harrow Road (A404) passes through Maida Hill, Queens Park and Kensal Green. This stretch runs partially alongside and underneath the Westway urban motorway.

At the junction of Ladbroke Grove the road leaves the City of Westminster and forms the boundary between the London Borough of Brent and the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea (except for the length between Kensal Green station and the entrance to Kensal Green Cemetery where it is entirely within Brent) until reaching Scrubs Lane where it becomes entirely within the borough of Brent.

It becomes High Street (Harlesden), Craven Park, Hillside and Brentfield.

Passing over the River Brent which formed the pre-1965 boundary between the former Municipal Borough of Willesden and the Metropolitan Borough of Wembley (both now defunct) and from which the modern borough takes its name, Harrow Road enters Wembley and passes through an area formerly known as Tokyngton.

Still numbered the A404, Harrow Road briefly becomes High Road (Wembley) and then Harrow Road (Sudbury), renumbered to be the A4005 at the junction with Watford Road (which continues to be the A404).

It passes from the London Borough of Brent into the London Borough of Harrow at the Sudbury Court Drive junction and for a while it is Sudbury Hill, London Road (Harrow) and finally Roxeth Hill High Street. The road finishes at the town centre on Harrow Hill.


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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
6 East Row, W10 6 East Row was a house along East Row which was demolished in 1960 as part of slum clearance in the area.
Adair Road before redevelopment A photo showing Adair Road’s junction with Golborne Gardens in March 1964.
Admiral Blake (The Cowshed) The Admiral Blake was situated at the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Barlby Road.
Barlby Primary School Barlby Road Primary School has long served the children of North Kensington.
Clayton Arms A pub which was situated halfway down West Row in Kensal Town.
Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance Emslie Horniman’s Pleasance is the traditional starting point for the Notting Hill Carnival.
Gas Light and Coke Company The gasometers of the Gas Light and Coke company dominated North Kensington until demolition in the late 20th century.
Harrow Road (1920s) Harrow Road in the 1920s, looking south east towards the Prince of Wales pub and the Emmanuel Church spire.
Hudson's the chemist (1906) Hudson's, a chemist shop, stood on the corner of Ilbert Street and Third Avenue in the Queen's Park estate.
Jack of Newbury The Jack of Newbury stood at the corner of East Row and Kensal Road until it was bombed on 2 October 1940.
Kensal House There are two Kensal Houses in London W10 - this was the original
Ladbroke Grove looking north (1900) This early 1900s image was taken just south of the junction of Ladbroke Grove and Treverton Street.
Ladbroke Grove railway bridge Looking north over Bartle Bridge in the 1950s
Lads of the Village One of the signature public houses along Kensal Road.
Middle Row School Middle Row School was established in the late 19th century to provide education to the children of Kensal New Town.
Portobello Arms The Portobello Arms was a former pub in Kensal Town, established in 1842.
Queen’s Park Library Queen’s Park Library was built to improve the minds of the new Queen’s Park Estate residents.
The Flora The Flora is situated on Harrow Road, W10.
The Foresters A lost pub of London W10
The Plough From the sixteenth century onwards, the Plough stood beside the Harrow Road.
The Victoria (Narrow Boat) The Victoria later became the Narrow Boat before it burned down.
Wedlake Street Baths In a time when most had somewhere to live but few had somewhere to wash at home, public baths were the place to go...
Western Arms The Western Arms was a pub situated on the corner of Ladbroke Grove and Kensal Road.
William Miller's Yard William Miller's Yard stood in Chapel Place, West Row.

NEARBY STREETS
Absalom Road, W10 Absalom Road was the former name for the western section of Golborne Gardens.
Adair Road, W10 Adair Road is a street on the Kensal Town/North Kensington borders.
Adair Tower, W10 Adair Tower is a post-war tower block on the corner of Adair Road and Appleford Road, W10.
Adela Street, W10 Adela Street is a small cul-de-sac in Kensal Town.
Admiral Mews, W10 Admiral Mews is a small road off Barlby Road, W10.
Alderson Street, W10 Alderson Street is a side street north of Kensal Road.
Alperton Street, W10 Alperton Street is the first alphabetically named street in the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Appleford House, W10 Appleford House is a residential block along Appleford Road.
Appleford Road, W10 Appleford Road was transformed post-war from a Victorian street to one dominated by housing blocks.
Barfett Street, W10 Barfett Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
Barlby Gardens, W10 Barlby Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Bosworth Road, W10 Bosworth Road was the first street built as Kensal New Town started to expand to the east.
Branstone Street, W10 Branstone Street, originally Bramston Street, disappeared in 1960s developments.
Bravington Road, W9 Bravington Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Briar Walk, W10 Briar Walk lies on the Queen's Park Estate
Bruckner Street, W10 Bruckner Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Buller Road, E11 A street within the NW10 postcode
Buller Road, NW10 Buller Road is a street in Willesden.
Caird Street, W10 Caird Street is the ’C’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate
Canal Close, W10 Canal Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Canal Way, W10 Canal Way was built on the site of the Kensal Gas Works.
Compton Road, NW10 Compton Road is a street in Willesden.
Conlan Street, W10 Conlan Street is one of the newer roads of Kensal Town.
Coomassie Road, W9 Coomassie Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Dart Street, W10 Dart Street runs eastwards from Third Avenue and becomes Marban Road.
Droop Street, W10 Droop Street is one of the main east-west streets of the Queen’s Park Estate.
East Row, W10 East Row is a road with a long history within Kensal Town.
Edenham Mews, W10 Edenham Mews was the site of a youth club and day nursery after the Second World War until demolition.
Edenham Street, W10 Edenham Street was swept away in 1969.
Enbrook Street, W10 Enbrook Street is another street north of Harrow Road, W10 without a pub.
Farrant Street, W10 Farrant Street is the missing link in the alphabetti spaghetti of the streetnames of the Queen’s Park Estate
Fermoy Road, W9 Fermoy Road was named in 1883 and partly built up by 1884
Fifth Avenue, W10 Fifth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
First Avenue, W10 First Avenue is street number one in the Queen's Park Estate
Fourth Avenue, W10 Shalfleet Drive is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Galton Street, W10 Galton Street lies within the Queen’s Park Estate, W10.
Golborne Gardens, W10 Golborne Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Halstow Road, NW10 Halstow Road was laid out in the 1890s.
Hawthorn Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
Hazlewood Crescent, W10 Hazlewood Crescent, much altered by 1970s redevelopment, is an original road of the area.
Hazlewood Tower, W10 Hazlewood Tower is a skyscraper in North Kensington, London W10.
Heather Walk, W10 Heather Walk lies in the Queen's Park Estate
Hormead Road, W9 Hormead Road was named in 1885 although its site was still a nursery ground until 1891.
Huxley Street, W10 Huxley Street is the only street beginning with an H on the Queen’s Park Estate.
Ilbert Street, W10 Ilbert Street is the ’I’ street on the Queen’s Park Estate, W10
James Collins Close, W9 James Collins Close is a street in Maida Vale.
James House, W10 James House is a residential block in Appleford Road.
John Fearon Walk, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Kensal House, W10 Kensal House (1936), was designed to show off the power of gas and originally had no electricity at all.
Kensal Place, W10 Kensal Place ran from Southam Street to Kensal Road.
Kensal Road, W10 Kensal Road, originally called Albert Road, is the heart of Kensal Town.
Kilravock Street, W10 Kilravock Street is a street on the Queen’s Park Estate, London W10
Lancefield Street, W10 Lancefield Street runs from Caird Street to Bruckner Street.
Lavie Mews, W10 Lavie Mews, W10 was a mews connecting Portobello Road and Murchison Road.
Lothrop Street, W10 Lothrop Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Manchester Drive, W10 Manchester Drive is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Maple Walk, W10 Post war development on the Queen’s Park Estate created some plant-based street names.
Marne Street, W10 Marne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Matthew Close, W10 Matthew Close is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Middle Row, W10 Middle Row is one of the original streets laid out as Kensal New Town.
Mozart Street, W10 Mozart Street was part of the second wave of development of the Queen’s Park Estate.
Murchison Road, W10 Murchison Road existed for just under 100 years.
Nutbourne Street, W10 Nutbourne Street is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Octavia House, W10 Octavia House on Southern Row was built in the late 1930s.
Parry Road, W10 Parry Road is on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Peach Road, W10 Paach Road is one of the newer streets of the Queen’s Park Estate in London W10
Pember Road, NW10 Pember Road is one of the side streets to the west of Kilburn Lane, NW10
Porlock Street, W10 Bransford Street became Porlock Street before vanishing altogether.
Portnall Road, W9 Portnall Road is a street in Maida Vale.
Raymede Street, W10 Raymede Street, after severe bomb damage in the area, disappeared after 1950.
Regent Street, NW10 Regent Street, otherwise an obscure side street is one of the oldest roads in Kensal Green.
Ronan Walk, W10 Ronan Walk was one of the streets constructed in a 1970s build parallel to the Harrow Road.
Salters Road, W10 Salters Road lies on the site of an old playground.
Second Avenue, W10 Second Avenue is one of the streets of the Queen's Park Estate, W10
Sixth Avenue, W10 Sixth Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Southam House, W10 Southam House is situated on Adair Road.
Southam Street, W10 Southam Street was made world-famous in the photographs of Roger Mayne.
Southern Row, W10 Southern Row was originally South Row to match the other streets in the neighbourhood.
St Johns Terrace, W10 St Johns Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Sycamore Walk, W10 Queen's Park Estate
The Quadrant, W10 The Quadrant is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Third Avenue, W10 Third Avenue is a street on the Queen's Park Estate, London W10
Tollbridge Close, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode area
Trellick Tower, W10 Trellick Tower is a 31-storey block of flats designed in the Brutalist style by architect Ernő Goldfinger, completed in 1972.
Treverton Street, W10 Treverton Street, a street which survived post war redevelopment.
Warfield Road, NW10 Warfield Road is a street in Willesden.
Wedlake Street, W10 Wedlake Street arrived as the second wave of building in Kensal Town was completed.
Wellington Road, NW10 Wellington Road commemorates the Duke of Wellington.
West Row, W10 West Row, W10 began its life in the early 1840s.
Western Dwellings, W10 Western Dwellings were a row of houses, opposite the Western Gas Works, housing some of the workers.


Kensal Town

Soapsuds Island

Kensal New Town was built between the Grand Central Canal (which opened in 1801) and the Great Western Railway line (opening in 1837) in the 1840s. It was built by a lawyer.

Single-storey cottages with gardens suitable for drying clothes were the first buildings and Kensal Road, Middle Row, West Row, East Row and Southern Row all appeared between 1841 and 1851. The rows of cottages quickly degenerated into a slum, mainly due to overcrowding, industrialisation and pollution.

The area was dominated by the Western Gas Company and Kensal Cemetery, which provided work but did little to improve the environment. Women were primarily involved in laundry work giving the area its nickname of ‘Soapsuds Island’.

The area was isolated from the rest of London at a time when Portobello Lane (now Portobello Road) was a muddy track sometimes impassable in bad weather.

Cut off from the municipal authorities it was left to charities to attempt to alleviate the social and health problems.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the cottage laundry industry began to be replaced by larger mechanized concerns.

In 1902 Charles Booth described it as, “Just as full of children and poverty as was the old woman’s dwelling in the nursery rhyme.” By this date the area had been transferred to the newly formed Royal Borough of Kensington. When the Piggeries and Potteries in Notting Dale were finally cleared in the early 20th century most of the displaced residents moved north into Golborne ward and Kensal.

By 1923 in the Southam Street area 140 houses contained some 2500 inhabitants. A series of evocative photographs by Roger Mayne in the 1950s showed that little had changed. It was only from the 1960s that the overcrowded and dilapidated terraces were cleared and replaced by social housing including Goldfinger’s Trellick Tower.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Jack of Newbury
TUM image id: 1080

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Chapel Place, W10
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The Flora
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Middle Row Bus Garage
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Middle Row School
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Pember Road, NW10 (1960s)
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