Abbey Orchard Street, SW1P

Road in/near Victoria, existing between 1667 and now

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Road · * · SW1P ·
August
16
2017

Abbey Orchard Street was the heart of a former slum area.

Abbey Orchard Street was built over a former orchard belonging to the monks of Westminster Abbey.

The street was built up in the rapid expansion of London following the Great Fire of 1666, but there may have been a path here long before, trodden out by the Abbey’s local peasant tenants on their way to labour in the orchard.

In time, the street’s fortunes declined.

The Devil’s Acre was a notorious slum on and behind Old Pye Street, Great St Anne’s Lane (now St Ann’s Street) and Duck Lane (now St Matthew Street) in the parish of Westminster.

In the 19th century it was considered one of the worst areas of London - The Devil’s Acre. As with a number of streets at the time, the building of Victoria Street was aimed at removing the slums in the area, and particularly the Devil’s Acre. The street was formally opened in 1851 and, as with other such projects, it displaced rather than removed the slum.

The street had been planned as an experiment in sanitary and moral engineering. In deciding the route of the street, the planner James Pennethorne’s objective "has only been to ascertain how best to improve the condition of the inhabitants of Westminster by improving the buildings, the levels, and the sewers, and by opening communications through the most crowded parts."

Pennethorne designed the street with a slight angle so that it would route through the Devil’s Acre. The slum inhabitants were displaced by the Victoria Street developments, as the quantity of low-rent houses in the area declined and they were unable to afford the rents of the newly constructed flats. John Hollingshead reported at the time that Victoria Street had divided "the diseased heart" in half, pushing inhabitants into the surrounding areas. The Bishop of London informed the House of Lords that Victoria Street had displaced 5,000 people, 75 per cent of whom moved into already overcrowded areas south of the Thames, with the remaining people staying in declining low-rent accommodation in Westminster.

New blocks of flats were constructed along Victoria Street and, according to Hollingshead, "While the nighmare street of unlet places was waiting for more capital to fill its yawning gulf, and a few more residents to warm its hollow chambers into life, the landlords of the slums were raising their rents: and thieves, prostitutes, labourers, and working women were packing in a smaller compas."

From the 1850s onwards the area around Westminster, including the Devil’s Acre, became the focus of a new movement of social housing, largely funded by George Peabody and the Peabody Trust. This movement had a lasting impact on the urban character of Westminster and many of the philanthropically funded social housing estates have survived into the 21st century.

In 1869 the Peabody Trust built one of its first housing estates at Brewer’s Green, between Victoria Street and St. James’s Park. What remained of the Devil’s Acre on the other side of Victoria Street was cleared and further Peabody estates were built after the Cross Act of 1875.

In 1882, the Peabody Trust built the Abbey Orchard Estate on the corner of Old Pye Street and Abbey Orchard Street. The estate was designed by Henry Darbishire and built on former marshland. The buildings rest on arches, supported by a foundation of piles. Like many of the social housing estates, the Abbey Orchard Estate was built following the square plan concept. Blocks of flats were built around a courtyard, creating a semi-private space within the estate functioning as recreation area. The courtyards were meant to create a community atmosphere and the blocks of flats were designed to allow sunlight into the courtyards. The blocks of flats were built using high-quality brickwork and included architectural features such as lettering, glazing, fixtures and fittings. The estates built in the area at the time were considered model dwellings and included shared laundry and sanitary facilities, innovative at the time, and fireplaces in some bedrooms. The design was subsequently repeated in numerous other housing estates in London.


Citation information: London Street Names – The Underground Map
Further citations and sources




CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Bruce McTavish   
Added: 11 Mar 2021 11:37 GMT   

Kennington Road
Lambeth North station was opened as Kennington Road and then Westminster Bridge Road before settling on its final name. It has a wonderful Leslie Green design.

Reply

Scott Hatton   
Added: 11 Sep 2020 19:47 GMT   

Millions Of Rats In Busy London
The Daily Mail on 14 April 1903 reported "MILLIONS OF RATS IN BUSY LONDON"

A rat plague, unprecedented in the annals of London, has broken out on the north side of the Strand. The streets principally infested are Catherine street, Drury lane, Blackmore street, Clare Market and Russell street. Something akin to a reign of terror prevails among the inhabitants after nightfall. Women refuse to pass along Blackmore street and the lower parts of Stanhope street after dusk, for droves of rats perambulate the roadways and pavements, and may be seen running along the window ledges of the empty houses awaiting demolition by the County Council in the Strand to Holborn improvement scheme.

The rats, indeed, have appeared in almost-incredible numbers. "There are millions of them," said one shopkeeper, and his statement was supported by other residents. The unwelcome visitors have been evicted from their old haunts by the County Council housebreakers, and are now busily in search of new homes. The Gaiety Restaurant has been the greatest sufferer. Rats have invaded the premises in such force that the managers have had to close the large dining room on the first floor and the grill rooms on the ground floor and in the basement. Those three spacious halls which have witnessed many as semblages of theatre-goers are now qui:e deserted. Behind the wainscot of the bandstand in the grillroom is a large mound of linen shreds. This represents 1728 serviettes carried theee by the rats.

In the bar the removal of a panel disclosed the astonishing fact that the rats have dragged for a distance of seven or eight yards some thirty or forty beer and wine bottles and stacked them in such a fashion as to make comfortable sleeping places. Mr Williams. the manager of the restaurant, estimates that the rats have destroyed L200 worth of linen. Formerly the Gaiety Restaurant dined 2000 persons daily; no business whatever is now done in this direction.

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Lived here
Richard Roques   
Added: 21 Jan 2021 16:53 GMT   

Buckingham Street residents
Here in Buckingham Street lived Samuel Pepys the diarist, Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling

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Comment
Pauline jones   
Added: 16 Oct 2017 19:04 GMT   

Bessborough Place, SW1V
I grew up in bessborough place at the back of our house and Grosvenor road and bessborough gardens was a fantastic playground called trinity mews it had a paddling pool sandpit football area and various things to climb on, such as a train , slide also as Wendy house. There were plants surrounding this wonderful play area, two playground attendants ,also a shelter for when it rained. The children were constantly told off by the playground keepers for touching the plants or kicking the ball out of the permitted area, there was hopscotch as well, all these play items were brick apart from the slide. Pollock was the centre of my universe and I felt sorry and still do for anyone not being born there. To this day I miss it and constantly look for images of the streets around there, my sister and me often go back to take a clumped of our beloved London. The stucco houses were a feature and the backs of the houses enabled parents to see thier children playing.

Reply

Justin Russ   
Added: 15 Feb 2021 20:25 GMT   

Binney Street, W1K
Binney St was previously named Thomas Street before the 1950’s. Before the 1840’s (approx.) it was named Bird St both above and below Oxford St.

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Comment
Jessie Doring   
Added: 22 Feb 2021 04:33 GMT   

Tisbury Court Jazz Bar
Jazz Bar opened in Tisbury Court by 2 Australians. Situated in underground basement. Can not remember how long it opened for.

Reply

The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Dec 2020 00:24 GMT   

Othello takes a bow
On 1 November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy Othello was presented for the first time, at The Palace of Whitehall. The palace was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698. Seven years to the day, Shakespeare’s romantic comedy The Tempest was also presented for the first time, and also at the Palace of Whitehall.

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Comment
Robert smitherman   
Added: 23 Aug 2017 11:01 GMT   

Saunders Street, SE11
I was born in a prefab on Saunders street SE11 in the 60’s, when I lived there, the road consisted of a few prefab houses, the road originally ran from Lollard street all the way thru to Fitzalan street. I went back there to have a look back in the early 90’s but all that is left of the road is about 20m of road and the road sign.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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Comment
Brenda Newton   
Added: 5 Jun 2021 07:17 GMT   

Hewer Street W10
John Nodes Undertakers Hewer Street W10

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Added: 3 Jun 2021 15:50 GMT   

All Bar One
The capitalisation is wrong

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Comment
   
Added: 2 Jun 2021 16:58 GMT   

Parachute bomb 1941
Charles Thomas Bailey of 82 Morley Road was killed by the parachute bomb March 1941

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Added: 1 Jun 2021 12:41 GMT   

Abbeville Road (1940 street directory)
North west side
1A Clarke A S Ltd, motor engineers
15 Plumbers, Glaziers & Domestic Engineers Union
25 Dixey Edward, florist
27 Vicary Miss Doris J, newsagent
29 Stenning John Andrew, dining rooms
31 Clarke & Williams, builders
33 Hill Mrs Theodora, confectioner
35 Golding W & sons, corn dealers
... here is Shandon road ...
37 Pennington Mrs Eliz Harvie, wine & spirit merchant
39 Westminster Catering Co Ltd, ham, beef & tongue dealers
41 Masters A (Clapham) Ltd, butchers
43 Thomas Euan Ltd, grocers
45 Garrett C T & Co Ltd, undertakers
47 Mayle T & Sons, fishmongers
49 Mayles Ltd, fruiterers
51 & 73 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
53 United Dairies (London) Ltd
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
55 Norris William Lennox, baker
57 Silver Star Laundry Ltd
59 Thorp John, oilman
61 Bidgood Leonard George, boot makers
63 Wilkie Rt Miln, chemist
65 Gander George Albert Isaac, hairdresser
67 Harris Alfred William, greengrocer
69 & 71 Lambert Ernest & Son Ltd, grocers
... here is Hambolt road ...
73 & 51 Hardy Arthur Sydney, draper
75 Cambourn Frederick, butcher
77 Siggers Clement, chemist
77 Post, Money Order, Telephone Call & Telegraph Office & Savings Bank
79 Hemmings William, baker
... here is Elms road ...
85 Cornish Joseph
91 Bedding Mrs
151 Johnson Mrs H K
157 Robinson Albert Ernest, grainer
173 Yardleys London & Provincial Stores Ltd, wine & spirit merchants
175 Clark Alfred, butcher
175A Morley Douglas Frederick, confectioner
... here is Crescent lane ...
... her is St Alphonsus road ...

South east side
... here is Trouville road ...
4 Bossy Miss, private school
... here are Bonneville gardens ...
24 Osborn Charles Edward, ladies hairdresser
24 Hall H Ltd, builders
24A Walton Lodge Laundry Ltd
... here are Shandon road & Abbeville mansions ...
28 Copley Fred Smith, chemist
30 Finch H G Ltd, laundry
32 Carter William Alfred, furniture dealer
34 Spriggs Charles & Co, wireless supplies dealer
36 Miles Frederick William, confectioner
38 Pitman Frederick, hairdresser
40 Rowe Frederick F, valeting service
42 Modridge Edward J, oilman
... here is Narbonne avenue ...
44 Southorn Albert, butcher
46 Brown Ernest, fruiterer
48 Stanley Mrs A A, confectioner
50 Fryatt Owen, delixatessen store
52 Benbrooks, domestic stores
54 Davis William Clifford, boot repairer
56 Blogg Alfred, newsagent
58 Rowlands Thomas & Sons, dairy
... here are Hambalt, Elms, Franconia, Caldervale & Leppoc roads ...
124 Clarke Frederick, decorator
... here are Crescent lane, Briarwood road & Park hill ...

Reply
Comment
Boo Horton    
Added: 31 May 2021 13:39 GMT   

Angel & Trumpet, Stepney Green
The Angel & Trumpet Public House in Stepney Green was run by my ancestors in the 1930’s. Unfortunately, it was a victim on WWII and was badly damaged and subsequently demolished. I have one photograph that I believe to bethe pub, but it doesn’t show much more that my Great Aunt cleaning the steps.

Reply
Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Tothill Fields Bridewell Tothill Fields Bridewell (also known as Tothill Fields Prison and Westminster Bridewell) was a prison located in Westminster between 1618 and 1884.
Westminster Westminster - heart of government.
Westminster Abbey Westminster Abbey, formally titled the Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, is one of the world’s greatest churches.

NEARBY STREETS
Abingdon Street, SW1P Abingdon Street has linked Old Palace Yard and Millbank since at least 1593.
Ambrosden Avenue, SW1P Ambrosden Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Angela Hooper Place, SW1E Angela Hooper Place is a location in London.
Arneway Street, SW1P Arneway Street is named for Thomas Arneway, former benefactor to the Westminster parish poor.
Artillery Place, SW1P Artillery Place was named after a former nearby artillery practice ground which stood here in the 19th century.
Artillery Row, SW1P Artillery Row skirts a former artillery ground.
Ashley Gardens, SW1P Ashley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Barton Street, SW1P Barton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Bennett’s Yard, SW1P Bennett’s Yard is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Birdcage Walk, SW1E Birdcage Walk runs east-west from the Parliament Square area (as Great George Street) to Buckingham Palace.
Birdcage Walk, SW1H Birdcage Walk runs east from Great George Street, along the south side of St James’s Park.
Brewers Green, SW1H Brewers Green is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Bridge Street, SW1A Bridge Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Broad Sanctuary, SW1P Broad Sanctuary is a road in the SW1H postcode area
Broadway, SW1H Broadway - formerly the location of the headquarters of both London Transport and the Metropolitan Police.
Butler Place, SW1H Butler Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Canon Row, SW1A Canon Row is at least one thousand year’s old.
Carteret Street, SW1H Carteret Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Castle Lane, SW1E Castle Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Caxton Street, SW1H William Caxton was responsible for the introduction of the printing press to England.
Chadwick Street, SW1P Chadwick Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Chubb Court, SW1P Chubb Court is a road in the SW20 postcode area
Coburg Close, SW1P Coburg Close is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Cockpit Steps, SW1H Cockpit Steps leads from Birdcage Walk to Old Queen Street.
Commissioner’s Yard, SW1A Commissioner’s Yard is a small street behind New Scotland Yard.
Cowley Street, SW1P Cowley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dacre Street, SW1H Dacre Street is named after Lady Anne Dacre.
Dartmouth Street, SW1H Dartmouth Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Dean Bradley House, SW1P Residential block
Dean Bradley Street, SW1P George Granville Bradley was Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1881.
Dean Farrar Street, SW1H Frederic William Farrar was a canon of Westminster Abbey.
Dean Ryle Street, SW1P Dean Ryle Street was named after Herbert Edward Ryle.
Dean Stanley Street, SW1P Dean Stanley Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Dean Trench Street, SW1P Dean Trench Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Deans Yard, SW1P Dean’s Yard comprises most of the precincts of the former monastery of Westminster, not occupied by the Abbey buildings.
Derby Gate, SW1A Derby Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Elverton Street, SW1P Elverton Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Emery Hill Street, SW1P Emery Hill Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Francis Street, SW1P Francis Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Gayfere Street, SW1P Gayfere Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Gordon House, SW1P Residential block
Great College Street, SW1P Great College Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Great George Street, SW1P Great George Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Great Peter Street, SW1P Great Peter Street bears the name of the patron saint of Westminster Abbey.
Great Smith Street, SW1P Great Smith Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greencoat Place, SW1P Greencoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Gardens, SW1P Greycoat Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Place, SW1P Greycoat Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycoat Street, SW1P Greycoat Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Greycote Place, SW1P Greycote Place is a location in London.
Horseferry Road, SW1P Horseferry Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Howick Place, SW1P Howick Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Howick Place, SW1P This is a street in the SW1E postcode area
King Charles Street, SW1A King Charles Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Kingsgate Parade, SW1E Kingsgate Parade is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Lambeth Bridge, SW1P Lambeth Bridge is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Lewisham Street, SW1H Lewisham Street is a Westminster alleyway.
Little Cloisters, SW1P Little Cloisters is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Little College Street, SW1P Little College Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Little Deans Yard, SW1P Little Deans Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Little George Street, SW1P Little George Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Lord North Street, SW1P Lord North Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Marsham Street, SW1P Marsham Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Matthew Parker Street, SW1H The Most Reverend Matthew Parker was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1559 until 1575.
Medway Street, SW1P Medway Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Monck Street, SW1P Monck Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
New Palace Yard, SW1P New Palace Yard was built by William II (William Rufus).
North Court, SW1P North Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Old Palace Yard, SW1P Old Palace Yard lies between the Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abbey.
Old Pye Street, SW1P Old Pye Street gets its name from Sir Robert Pye, member of parliament for Westminster in the time of Charles I.
Old Queen Street, SW1H Old Queen Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Palmer Street, SW1H Palmer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Parliament Square, SW1A Parliament Square is one of the most important squares in Westminster, home to the Houses of Parliament and Westminster Abbey.
Parliament Street, SW1A Parliament Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Petty France, SW1H Petty France is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Post Office Way, SW1H Post Office Way is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Price’s Court, SW1P A street within the SW1P postcode
Queen Anne’s Gate, SW1H This is a street in the SW1H postcode area
Queen Annes Gate Buildings, SW1H Queen Annes Gate Buildings is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Queen Annes Gate, SW1H Queen Annes Gate is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Regency Place, SW1P Regency Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Rochester Street, SW1P Rochester Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Romney Street, SW1P Romney Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Seaforth Place, SW1E Seaforth Place is a road in the SW1E postcode area
Smith Square, SW1P Smith Square was originally developed by Sir James Smith around 1726.
Spenser Street, SW1P Spenser Street is a road in the SW1E postcode area
St Anns Street, SW1P St Anns Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St Margaret Street, SW1P St Margaret Street is the road immediately outside Westminster Hall.
St Matthew Street, SW1P St Matthew Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St Vincents Centre, SW1P St Vincents Centre is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
St. Ermin’s Hill, SW1H St. Ermin’s Hill is a road in the SW1H postcode area
St. Matthew Street, SW1P St. Matthew Street is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Storey’s Gate, SW1H Abraham Storey, one of Wren’s master-masons, built Storey’s Gate that now commemorates his name.
Strutton Ground, SW1P Strutton Ground is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
The Sanctuary, SW1P The Sanctuary is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
The Terrace, SW1P The Terrace is a road in the SW1P postcode area
Thirleby Road, SW1P Thirleby Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Tothill Street, SW1H Tothill Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Tufton Street, SW1P Tufton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Vandon Passage, SW1H Vandon Passage probably dates from the fifteenth century.
Vandon Street, SW1H Vandon Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Victoria Chambers, SW1P Victoria Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1E Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1W postal area.
Victoria Street, SW1P Victoria Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Westminster Central Hall, SW1H Westminster Central Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW1H postal area.
Westminster Mansions, SW1P Westminster Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Westminster Palace Gardens, SW1P Westminster Palace Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1P postal area.
Westminster Pier, SW1A Westminster Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Wilcox Place, SW1P Wilcox Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1E postal area.
Windsor Place, SW1P Windsor Place connects Francis Street with Greencoat Place.


Victoria

The railways largely replaced the canals as a means of transport. Uniquely for a main line station, Victoria station was built on top of one.

Before the railway arrived in 1862, this area - like the area immediately south of it - was known as Pimlico. The Grosvenor Canal ended in a large basin here.

Victoria station’s origins lie with the Great Exhibition of 1851, when a railway called the West End of London and Crystal Palace Railway came into existence, serving the site of the exhibition halls which had been transferred to Sydenham from Hyde Park. The terminus of that railway was at Stewarts Lane in Battersea on the south side of the river. In 1858 a joint enterprise was set up to take trains over the river: it was entitled the Victoria Station and Pimlico Railway; and was a mile and a quarter in length. The railway was owned by four railway companies: the Great Western (GWR); London & North Western (LNWR); the London, Brighton and South Coast (LBSCR); and the London Chatham and Dover Railways (LCDR). It was incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1858.

The station was built in two parts: those on the western side, opened in 1862, with six platforms, ten tracks and an hotel (the 300-bedroom Grosvenor) were occupied by the Brighton company; whilst adjacent, and in the same year, the Chatham company were to occupy a less imposing wooden-fronted building. The latter’s station had nine tracks and was shared by broad-gauge trains of the GWR, whose trains arrived from Southall via the West London Extension Joint Railway through Chelsea. The GWR remained part owner of the station until 1932, although its trains had long since ceased to use it. Each side of the station had its own entrance and a separate station master; a wall between the two sections effectively emphasised that fact.

At the start of the twentieth century both parts of the station were rebuilt. It now had a decent frontage and forecourt, but not as yet a unified existence. Work on the Brighton side was completed in 1908 and was carried out in red brick; the Grosvenor Hotel was rebuilt at the same time. The Chatham side, in a Edwardian style with baroque elements, designed by Alfred Bloomfield, was completed a year later. The two sections were eventually connected in 1924 by removing part of a screen wall, when the platforms were renumbered as an entity. The station was redeveloped internally in the 1980s, with the addition of shops within the concourse, and above the western platforms.

The station was now serving boat trains, and during WWI it became the hub of trains carrying soldiers to and from France, many of them wounded. After the war the Continental steamer traffic became concentrated there, including the most famous of those trains, the Golden Arrow. The area around the station also became a site for other other forms of transport: a bus station in the forecourt; a coach terminal to the south; and it is now the terminal for trains serving Gatwick Airport.

Victoria is also well-served by London underground. The sub-surface Circle and District Lines opened on December 24, 1868; and the Victoria Line line came to Victoria Station with the third phase of construction of the line - the station’s platforms were opened on March 7, 1969, six months after the Victoria line had started running in outer London.


LOCAL PHOTOS
William Shakespeare
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Hungerford Stairs circa 1828
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Broadway SW1
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Entrance to Pickering Place
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Waterloo Place (1913)
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In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
William Shakespeare
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Wood engraving showing mothers, with their children, exercising at Tothill Fields Prison, London. Shelfmark: Crime 9 (64)
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Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath (1749)
Credit: Canaletto
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Broadway SW1
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Cockpit Steps in Westminster once led down to the Royal Cockpit - an 18th century cockfighting venue. The Royal Cockpit disappeared in 1810 but the stairs have remained.
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Whitehall, just before the 1953 Coronation. View northwards from Horse Guards Avenue towards Trafalgar Square. Decorations are already going up for the Queen’s Coronation six days later.
Credit: Ben Brooksbank
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Parliament Square (1980) Parliament Square features a large open green area in the centre with trees to its west, and it contains twelve political statues of statesmen and other notable individuals.
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