Phillimore Place, W8

Road in/near Kensington, existing between 1855 and now

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Road · Kensington · W8 ·
August
18
2017

Phillimore Place was part of the old Phillimore Estate and, at first, named Durham Villas.

In 1779, William Phillimore inherited the Phillimore Estate and was responsible for the first wave of its Kensington development.

One of the ancient roads out of London ran along the southern boundary of the estate. This road was later to be called Kensington High Street. A terrace of houses was built along this frontage and called Upper Phillimore Place. Apparently George III hated Upper Phillimore Place so much that he had the blinds pulled down on his carriage windows if he had to pass it; and he referred to it as “Dishcloth Row” because of the mouldings in the shape of drapery which decorated the houses facades.

A similar terrace was built further to the east and called Lower Phillimore Place. These houses were all later replaced in the 20th century by three huge mansion blocks called Phillimore Court, Stafford Court and Troy Court. The land itself was later sold off to pay estate duties, so the Kensington High Street frontage no longer forms part of the Phillimore Estate.

In 1804, William Phillimore authorised more development in the area of today’s Hornton Street. The houses are long since gone. In 1946 Kensington Borough Council bought the Hornton Street site for the council’s offices.

William Phillimore died in 1818 and the Phillimore estate passed to his son, William Robert Phillimore.

William Robert Phillimore in turn died in 1829. He put the Kensington Estate was in a trust for the benefit of his younger son, Charles, but subject to an obligation to fund a payment of £5,000 to each of Charles’s two sisters.

Under Charles’s control, nothing much changed on the estate for the next twenty five years. But during that time a great deal of the surrounding countryside had been transformed into the Kensington we see today. He decided to jump on the bandwagon in about 1855 and the result was the building of the Phillimore Estate as it is today.

Joseph Gordon Davis, a builder involved in construction in Pimlico, took most of the undeveloped land south of Duchess of Bedford’s Walk, down to Upper and Lower Phillimore Place. On it were constructed Phillimore Gardens, Upper Phillimore Gardens, Phillimore Place, Essex Villas, Stafford Terrace, Phillimore Walk, Argyll Road and Campden Hill Road.

The agreement allowed Davis to put up 375 houses. Phillimore agreed to grant leases for ninety nine years from 1855. The ground rent would be £1,400 a year for the whole site, but it would only rise to that after the first five years, to give Davis time to make some profit from letting or selling completed properties. A time limit of twelve years was imposed for completing the development.

It became clear over time that the density of housing which had been agreed was too great. In 1856, the permitted number of houses was reduced to 315 and it was agreed that none would be built along Duchess of Bedford’s Walk (presumably due to opposition from the rich owners of the detached houses on the other side).

In 1861 the total number was reduced again to a maximum of 225 and a minimum of 205. It seems that the terms Davis had originally negotiated contained enough profit to allow him to absorb these reductions. In the end, 214 houses were built. This was not necessarily loss to Davis. He was allowed to construct valuable detached and semi-detached villas, in place of the purely terraced houses originally stipulated.

The deal with Davis ultimately became the subject of a private Act of Parliament. William Robert Phillimore’s Will had stated that building leases could only be granted at the best rents and there was some argument that Charles had granted leases at less than full market rent to encourage construction. So an Act was needed to confirm the terms of the leases and to authorise further leases at rents low enough to encourage builders to undertake construction contracts.

The original building agreements with Davis had contained specific elevations and plans he had to adhere to. By the time of the 1861 Agreement, the obligation was diluted to simply requiring Charles Phillimore’s approval of particulars plans. It is not known who designed the general layout, or actually prepared or approved plans. Phillimore’s surveyor was Arthur Chesterton, and he probably did the approval work.

Davis did not plan to carry out all the work himself. As was customary at the time, he assigned parts of the project to other builders. One builder was James Jordan of Paddington, who built eleven houses on the west side of Campden Hill Road, went bankrupt, returned to build houses in Argyll Road, and went bust again in 1859. Another builder was Charles Frederick Phelps. Davis himself built most of the larger houses in Phillimore Gardens and Upper Phillimore Gardens.

Charles Phillimore died in 1863.


Citation information: Phillimore Estate, Kensington » The Underground Map
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Lived here
Tom Vague   
Added: 9 Sep 2020 14:02 GMT   

The Bedford family at 3 Acklam Road (1860 - 1965)
From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.

When the Westway construction work began the Bedfords sold up and moved to south London. In the early 1970s the house was taken over by the North Kensington Amenity Trust and became the Notting Hill Carnival office before its eventual demolition.

Anne Bedford (now McSweeney) has fond memories of living there, although she recalls: ’I now know that the conditions were far from ideal but then I knew no different. There was no running hot water, inside toilet or bath, apart from the tin bath we used once a week in the large kitchen/dining room. Any hot water needed was heated in a kettle. I wasn’t aware that there were people not far away who were a lot worse off than us, living in poverty in houses just like mine but families renting one room. We did have a toilet/bathroom installed in 1959, which was ’luxury’.

’When the plans for the Westway were coming to light, we were still living in the house whilst all the houses opposite became empty and boarded up one by one. We watched all this going on and decided that it was not going to be a good place to be once the builders moved in to demolish all the houses and start work on the elevated road. Dad sold the house for a fraction of what it should have been worth but it needed too much doing to it to bring it to a good living standard. We were not rich by any means but we were not poor. My grandmother used to do her washing in the basement once a week by lighting a fire in a big concrete copper to heat the water, which would have been there until demolition.

’When we moved from number 3, I remember the upright piano that my grandparents used to play - and me of sorts - being lowered out of the top floor and taken away, presumably to be sold. I used to play with balls up on the wall of the chemist shop on the corner of Acklam and Portobello. We would mark numbers on the pavement slabs in a grid and play hopscotch. At the Portobello corner, on one side there was the Duke of Sussex pub, on the other corner, a chemist, later owned by a Mr Fish, which I thought was amusing. When I was very young I remember every evening a man peddling along Acklam Road with a long thin stick with which he lit the streetlights.’ Michelle Active who lived at number 33 remembers: ’6 of us lived in a one-bed basement flat on Acklam Road. When they demolished it we moved to a 4-bed maisonette on Silchester Estate and I thought it was a palace, two toilets inside, a separate bathroom that was not in the kitchen, absolute heaven.’



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Joan Clarke   
Added: 2 Feb 2021 10:54 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My late aunt Ivy Clarke (nee Burridge) lived with her whole family at 19 Avondale Park Gardens, according to the 1911 census and she was still there in 1937.What was it like in those days, I wonder, if the housing was only built in 1920?


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Lived here
David Jones-Parry   
Added: 7 Sep 2017 12:13 GMT   

Mcgregor Road, W11 (1938 - 1957)
I was born n bred at 25 Mc Gregor Rd in 1938 and lived there until I joined the Royal Navy in 1957. It was a very interesting time what with air raid shelters,bombed houses,water tanks all sorts of areas for little boys to collect scrap and sell them on.no questions asked.A very happy boyhood -from there we could visit most areas of London by bus and tube and we did.

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ken gaston   
Added: 16 Jan 2021 11:04 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens
My grandmother Hilda Baker and a large family lived in number 18 . It was a close community and that reflected in the coronation celebration held on the central green . I grew up in that square and went to school at Sirdar Road then St. Clements it was a great place to grow up with a local park and we would also trek to Holland Park or Kensington Gardens .Even then the area was considered deprived and a kindergarden for criminals . My generation were the first to escape to the new towns and became the overspill from London to get decent housing and living standards .

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 28 Dec 2020 08:31 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
I was born in Hammersmith Hospital (Ducane Rd) I lived at 40 Blecynden Street from birth in 1942 to 1967 when I moved due to oncoming demolition for the West way flyover.
A bomb fell locally during the war and cracked one of our windows, that crack was still there the day I left.
It was a great street to have grown up in I have very fond memories of living there.



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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:48 GMT   

Mary Place Workhouse
There was a lady called Ivy who lived in the corner she use to come out an tell us kids off for climbing over the fence to play football on the green. Those were the days.

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charlie evans   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 18:51 GMT   

apollo pub 1950s
Ted Lengthorne was the landlord of the apollo in the 1950s. A local called darkie broom who lived at number 5 lancaster road used to be the potman,I remember being in the appollo at a street party that was moved inside the pub because of rain for the queens coronation . Not sure how long the lengthornes had the pub but remember teds daughter julie being landlady in the early 1970,s

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:30 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Went to school St Johns with someone named Barry Green who lived in that St. Use to wait for him on the corner take a slow walk an end up being late most days.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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john ormandy   
Added: 14 Mar 2021 18:59 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
We moved to number 6 in 1950 an family still live there now. I think i remember a family name of Larter living in the house you mention also living in the Gdns were names Prior, Cannon, Parsons Clives at number 26 who i went to school with.


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Brian Lucas   
Added: 15 Mar 2021 16:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
I also lived here at No. 15 1854 then move to No. 23 The Lucas Family

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 17:21 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Remember the Lucas family think the eldest was about same age as me cant remember his name though seem to rember had several younger sisters may have been twins!!

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john ormandy   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 18:02 GMT   

Avondale Park Gardens, W11
Went to that coranation party with my two younger brothers who both went to St Clements along with Alan Mullery the footballer. I went to St James before moving on to St Johns along with Alan who lived in Mary Place where we were both in the same class.

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
   
Added: 14 Jan 2022 03:06 GMT   

Goldbourne Gardens W 10
I lived in Goldbourne Gardens in the 50,s very happy big bomb site

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Chris Nash   
Added: 10 Jan 2022 22:54 GMT   

Shortlands Close, DA17
Shortlands Close and the flats along it were constructed in the mid-1990s. Prior to this, the area was occupied by semi-detached houses with large gardens, which dated from the post-war period and were built on the site of Railway Farm. The farm and its buildings spanned the length of Abbey Road, on the south side of the North Kent Line railway tracks.

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 07:17 GMT   

Smithy in Longacre
John Burris 1802-1848 Listed 1841 census as Burroughs was a blacksmith, address just given as Longacre.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Roy Batham   
Added: 7 Jan 2022 05:50 GMT   

Batham Family (1851 - 1921)
I start with William Batham 1786-1852 born in St.Martins Middlesex. From various sources I have found snippets of information concerning his early life. A soldier in 1814 he married Mary Champelovier of Huguenot descent By 1819 they were in Kensington where they raised 10 children. Apart from soldier his other occupations include whitesmith, bell hanger and pig breeder. I find my first record in the 1851 English sensus. No street address is given, just ’The Potteries’. He died 1853. Only one child at home then George Batham 1839-1923, my great grandfather. By 1861 he is living in Thomas St. Kensington with his mother. A bricklayer by trade 1871, married and still in Thomas St. 1881 finds him in 5,Martin St. Kensington. 1891 10,Manchester St. 1911, 44 Hunt St Hammersmith. Lastly 1921 Census 7, Mersey St. which has since been demolished.

Source: Batham/Wiseman - Family Tree

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Born here
sam   
Added: 31 Dec 2021 00:54 GMT   

Burdett Street, SE1
I was on 2nd July 1952, in Burdett chambers (which is also known as Burdett buildings)on Burdett street

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Lived here
John Neill   
Added: 25 Nov 2021 11:30 GMT   

Sandringham Road, E10 (1937 - 1966)
I lived at No. 61 with my parents during these years. I went to Canterbury Road school (now Barclay Primary) and sang as a boy soprano (treble) in the church choir at St Andrew’s church, on the corner of Forest Glade.
Opposite us lived the Burgess family. Their son Russell also sang in my choir as a tenor. He later became a well-known musician and the choirmaster at Wandsworth Boys’ School.
Just at the end of WW2 a German rocket (V2) landed in the grounds of Whipps Cross Hospital, damaging many of the houses in Sandringham Road, including ours.

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Tim Stevenson   
Added: 16 Nov 2021 18:03 GMT   

Pub still open
The Bohemia survived the 2020/21 lockdowns and is still a thriving local social resource.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Biba Biba was a London fashion store of the 1960s and 1970s, started and primarily run by the Polish-born Barbara Hulanicki with help of her husband Stephen Fitz-Simon.
Derry and Toms Derry & Toms was a London department store.
Kensington Roof Garden Kensington Roof Garden (formerly known as Derry and Toms Roof Gardens) covers 6000 square metres.
Kensington School The Kensington Proprietary Grammar School was an educational establishment founded in 1830 that is perhaps best remembered for being one of the founders of the Football Association in 1863.
Linley Sambourne House 18 Stafford Terrace, formerly known as Linley Sambourne House, was the home of the Punch illustrator Edward Linley Sambourne and open as a museum.
St Mary Abbots St Mary Abbots is a church located on Kensington High Street and the corner of Kensington Church Street in London W8.

NEARBY STREETS
Abingdon Mansions, W8 The Abbots of Abingdon were once Lords of the Manor of Abbot’s Kensington.
Abingdon Road, W8 Abingdon Road stretches between Stratford Road and Kensington High Street.
Abingdon Villas, W8 Abingdon Villas runs between Earls Court Road and Marloes Road.
Adam And Eve Mews, W8 Adam And Eve Mews is a street in Kensington.
Allen Street, W8 Allen Street extends south from Kensington High Street.
Argyll Road, W8 Argyll Road was built as part of the development of the Phillimore Estate.
Ball Street, W8 Ball Street was created by the Kensington Improvement Scheme of 1868-71, carried out by the Metropolitan Board of Works.
Campden Grove, W8 Campden Grove runs between Kensington Church Street and Hornton Street.
Campden Hill Close, W8 Campden Hill Close is a small cul-de-sac entered by a narrow driveway off Hornton Street.
Campden Hill Court, W8 Campden Hill Court is a street in Kensington.
Campden Hill Road, W8 Campden Hill Road is a street in Kensington.
Campden Hill, W8 Campden Hill is a hill and street in Kensington.
Cheniston Gardens, W8 Cheniston Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Cope Place, W8 Cope Place is a street in Kensington.
Derry Street, W8 Derry Street formerly known as King Street and laid out in the mid-1730s.
Drayson Mews, W8 Drayson Mews is a street in Kensington.
Duchess of Bedford’s Walk, W8 Lady Georgiana Russell, wife of John Russell, 6th Duke of Bedford lived at Argyll Lodge, a former house on Campden Hill, near the location of the road.
Earl’s Terrace, W8 Earl’s Terrace is a road in the W8 postcode area
Eden Close, W8 Eden Close is a street in Kensington.
Edwardes Place, W8 Edwardes Place is a street in Kensington.
Edwardes Square, W8 Edwardes Square is a garden square in Kensington.
Essex Villas, W8 Essex Villas is a road in the W8 postcode area
Gloucester Walk, W8 Gloucester Walk is a road in the W8 postcode area
Gordon Place, W8 Gordon Place is a street in Kensington.
Gregory Place, W8 Gregory Place is a street in Kensington.
Holland House, W8 Residential block
Holland Lane, W8 Holland Lane was a small side street next to the Holland Arms.
Holland Park Ilchester Place, W14 Holland Park Ilchester Place is a street in Kensington.
Holland Park Road, W14 Holland Park Road is a street in West Kensington.
Holland Park Road, W14 Holland Park Road runs between Addison Road and Melbury Road.
Holland Park, W8 Holland Park is a street in Notting Hill.
Holland Street, W8 Holland Street is a street in Kensington.
Hornton Place, W8 Hornton Place is a street in Kensington.
Hornton Street, W8 Hornton Street is a street in Kensington.
Ilchester Place, W14 Ilchester Place runs between Abbotsbury Road and Melbury Road, immediately adjacent to the southern boundary of Holland Park itself.
Ilchester Place, W14 Ilchester Place is a road in the W8 postcode area
Inverness Gardens, W8 Inverness Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Iverna Court, W8 Iverna Court is a street in Kensington.
Iverna Gardens, W8 Iverna Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Arcade, W8 Kensington Arcade is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Church Court, W8 Kensington Church Court is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Church Street, W8 Kensington Church Street is a street in Kensington.
Kensington Church Walk, W8 Kensington Church Walk is a street in Kensington.
Kensington High Street, W8 Kensington High Street is one of western London’s most popular shopping streets, with upmarket shops serving a wealthy area.
Lancer Square, W8 Lancer Square is a street in Kensington.
Macmillan House, W8 Residential block
Melbury Court, W8 Melbury Court is a road in the W8 postcode area
Melbury Road, W14 Melbury Road is a grand, sweeping avenue, laid out from 1875 onwards.
Melon Place, W8 Melon Place is a street in Kensington.
Observatory Gardens, W8 Observatory Gardens commemorates what was the world’s finest private observatory.
Old Court Place, W8 Old Court Place is a street in Kensington.
Park Close, W14 Park Close is a road in the W14 postcode area
Pembroke Place, W8 Pembroke Place is a street in Kensington.
Phillimore Gardens, W8 Phillimore Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Phillimore Walk, W8 Phillimore Walk is a street in Kensington.
Pitt Street, W8 Pitt Street is a street in Kensington.
Scarsdale Place, W8 Scarsdale Place is a street in Kensington.
Sheffield Terrace, W8 Sheffield Terrace is a street in Kensington.
Sheldrake Place, W8 Sheldrake Place is a street in Kensington.
St Margarets Lane, W8 St Margarets Lane is a road in the W8 postcode area
St Mary Abbots Terrace, W14 St Mary Abbots Terrace is a street in West Kensington.
St Mary Abbots Vicarage, W8 St Mary Abbots Vicarage is a street in Kensington.
St Mary Abbot’s Place, W8 This is a street in the W8 postcode area
Stable Yard Ilchester Place, W14 Stable Yard Ilchester Place is a street in Kensington.
Stafford Terrace, W8 Stafford Terrace was built between 1868 and 1874 by builder Joseph Gordon Davis.
Stone Hall Gardens, W8 Stone Hall Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Strangways Terrace, W14 Strangways Terrace is a road in the W14 postcode area
Thornwood Gardens, W8 Thornwood Gardens is a road in the W8 postcode area
Tor Court, W8 Tor Court is a street in Kensington.
Tor Gardens, W8 Tor Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Upper Phillimore Gardens, W8 Upper Phillimore Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Court, W8 Vicarage Court is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gardens, W8 Vicarage Gardens is a street in Kensington.
Vicarage Gate, W8 Vicarage Gate is a street in Kensington.
Warwick Chambers, W8 Warwick Chambers is a street in Kensington.
Wrights Lane, W8 Wrights Lane is a street in Kensington.
Wynnstay Gardens, W8 Wynnstay Gardens is a road in the W8 postcode area
York Passage, W8 York Passage is a road in the W8 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
Dirty Bones This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Elephant & Castle This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Holland Arms Holland Arms was a pub on Kensington High Street.
Princess Victoria This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Scampi’s Kingdom This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Scarsdale This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Kensington

Kensington is a district of West London, England within the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, located west of Charing Cross.

The focus of the area is Kensington High Street, a busy commercial centre with many shops, typically upmarket. The street was declared London's second best shopping street in February 2005 thanks to its range and number of shops.

The edges of Kensington are not well-defined; in particular, the southern part of Kensington blurs into Chelsea, which has a similar architectural style. To the west, a transition is made across the West London railway line and Earl's Court Road further south into other districts, whilst to the north, the only obvious dividing line is Holland Park Avenue, to the north of which is the similar district of Notting Hill.

Kensington is, in general, an extremely affluent area, a trait that it now shares with its neighbour to the south, Chelsea. The area has some of London's most expensive streets and garden squares.

Kensington is also very densely populated; it forms part of the most densely populated local government district (the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea) in the United Kingdom. This high density is not formed from high-rise buildings; instead, it has come about through the subdivision of large mid-rise Victorian and Georgian terraced houses (generally of some four to six floors) into flats.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Notting Hill
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Abingdon Arms Pub, Abingdon Road.
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Boyne Terrace Mews, W11
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3-4 Ladbroke Terrace in 2006.
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Marloes Road, W8
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Notting Hill in Bygone Days
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Ladbroke Square Garden
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In the neighbourhood...

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The Holland Arms on Kensington High Street, drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd. The writer Joseph Addison was a frequent customer.
Credit: Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea
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Abingdon Arms Pub, Abingdon Road.
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Allen Street
Credit: GoArt/The Underground Map
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Marloes Road, W8
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The corner depicted is that of Abingdon Road and Scarsdale Villas, showing the church in the background.
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Serving refreshments to shelterers at Holland Park underground station (1940)
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