Adelphi Terrace, WC2N

Road in/near Embankment, existing between 1769 and now

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Road · Embankment · WC2N ·
JANUARY
15
2018

Adelphi Terrace is named after John and Robert Adam, who built the Adelphi development in the 1760s.


The Adam brothers created an elegant residential district raised on high arches, with the lower streets under-ground at Thames level.

When the Adelphi scheme was first proposed, Mr. Coutts, of the Strand, being anxious to preserve the views over the Kent and Surrey hills, which the back windows of his banking house had, purchased a share of the Durham Gardens property, and arranged with the Adam brothers that the new streets should be laid out as to preserve the vista.

Robert Street was accordingly planned as to form a frame for the wealthy banker’s landscape. The piece of land between William Street and John Street was at that time occupied by his strong rooms, connected underground with the office, and built up only to the level of the Strand. When it became necessary to enlarge his premises he procured a special Act of Parliament for throwing an arch over William Street.


Citation information: London Street Names (book)
Further citations and sources


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Embankment

Embankment underground station has been known by various names during its long history - including "Embankment".

The station has two entrances, one on Victoria Embankment and the other on Villiers Street, adjacent to Victoria Embankment Gardens.

The station is in two parts: sub-surface platforms opened in 1870 by the Metropolitan District Railway (MDR) as part of the company's extension of the Inner Circle eastwards from Westminster to Blackfriars and deep-level platforms opened in 1906 by the Baker Street and Waterloo Railway (BS&WR) and 1914 by the Charing Cross, Euston and Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR). A variety of underground and mainline services have operated over the sub-surface tracks and the CCE&HR part of the station was reconstructed in the 1920s.

After having been named both Charing Cross and Embankment, in 1974 the station was renamed Charing Cross Embankment. Then, on 12 September 1976, it became Embankment, so that the merged Strand and Trafalgar Square stations could be named Charing Cross.

Contrary to popular belief, the shortest walking distance between two stations is not the 250 metres between Leicester Square and Covent but between Charing Cross and Embankment, a distance of 100 metres.

During summer 2013, Oswald Laurence’s famous 'mind the gap' announcement was reinstated to Embankment station after a request from his widow who would come to Embankment station after he died just to hear his voice. She asked for a copy of the iconic mind the gap announcement her husband made some 40 years before - instead staff decided to restore the recording.
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