All Saints Road, W11

Road in/near Notting Hill, existing between 1861 and now

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(51.51874 -0.20442, 51.518 -0.204) 

All Saints Road, W11

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502021Remove markers
Road · * · W11 ·
MAY
4
2020

Built between 1852-61, All Saints Road is named after All Saints Church on Talbot Road.

The church of All-Saints-With-St Columb was built by the the Reverend Samuel Walker, who came from St Columb Major, near St Ervan Cornwall: hence also the names of nearby Cornwall Crescent and St Ervan’s Road.

In 1852, Walker bought several fields of Portobello Farm and spent thousands of pounds developing them, starting with the church.

The church was isolated and derelict for ten years and local residents and irreverently called it ’Walker’s Folly’ or ’All Sinners in the Mud.

By the 1950s, All Saints Road was attracting its first West Indian immigrants. Nearby was the Tavistock Road lodging house of Mrs Fisher, who was known as the first Notting Hill landlady to rent to black people.

Amongst many cinematic claims to fame, Ringo Starr’s ’walkabout’ from ’A Hard Day’s Night’ partly took place in the street.

The Westway motorway was built to the north of All Saints Road in 1969 and between then and the mid 1980s, the crime rate here was amongst the worst in London. However, establishments such as the Mangrove and Apollo put the road at the cultural heart of W11.

The gentrification of Notting Hill started in the late 1980s not leaving All Saints Road behind. Properties are now measured in the millions of pounds and trendy restaurants have moved in.


Citation information: London Street Names (book)
Further citations and sources



All Saints Road, W11</SPAN>

All Saints Road, W11

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
3 Acklam Road From the 19th century up until 1965, number 3 Acklam Road, near the Portobello Road junction, was occupied by the Bedford family.
Acklam Road protests Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Albert Hotel The Albert Hotel stood on the corner of All Saints Road and Westbourne Park Road.
All Saints Notting Hill All Saints church was designed by the Victorian Gothic revival pioneer William White, who was also a mountaineer, Swedish gymnastics enthusiast and anti-shaving campaigner.
Duke of Cornwall The Duke of Cornwall pub morphed into the uber-trendy "The Ledbury" restaurant.
Graffiti along Acklam Road (1970s) Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway
Kensington Hippodrome The Kensington Hippodrome was a racecourse built in Notting Hill, London, in 1837, by entrepreneur John Whyte.
Kensington Park Hotel The KPH is a landmark pub on Ladbroke Grove.
Ladbroke Grove Ladbroke Grove is named after James Weller Ladbroke, who developed the Ladbroke Estate in the mid nineteenth century, until then a largely rural area on the western edges of London.
North Kensington Library North Kensington Library opened in 1891 and was described as one of London’s finest public libraries.
Political meeting (1920s) Meeting in front of the Junction Arms situated where Tavistock Road, Crescent and Basing Road met.
Portobello Farm Portobello Farm House was approached along Turnpike Lane, sometimes referred to as Green’s Lane, a track leading from Kensington Gravel Pits towards a wooden bridge over the canal.
Portobello Green Portobello Green features a shopping arcade under the Westway along Thorpe Close, an open-air market under the canopy, and community gardens.
St. Joseph’s Home St Joseph's dominated a part of Portobello Road up until the 1980s.
The Apollo The Apollo pub was located at 18 All Saints Road, on the southeast corner of the Lancaster Road junction.
The Mitre The Mitre was situated at 62 Golborne Road.

NEARBY STREETS
Acklam Road, W10 Acklam Road was the centre of much action during the building of the Westway.
Alba Place, W11 Alba Place is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Aldridge Court, W11 Aldridge Court is in Aldridge Road Villas.
Aldridge Road Villas, W11 Aldridge Road Villas is a surviving fragment of mid-Victorian residential development.
Artesian Road, W11 Artesian Road lies just over the boundary into Paddington from Notting Hill.
Athlone Place, W10 Athlone Place runs between Faraday Road and Bonchurch Road.
Basing Street, W11 Basing Street was originally Basing Road between 1867 and 1939.
Bevington Road, W10 Bevington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Blagrove Road, W10 This is a street in the W10 postcode.
Blenheim Crescent, W11 Blenheim Crescent one of the major thoroughfares in Notting Hill - indeed it features in the eponymous film.
Bonchurch Road, W10 Bonchurch Road was first laid out in the 1870s.
Cambridge Gardens, W10 Cambridge Gardens is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Caradoc Close, W2 Caradoc Close is a street in Paddington.
Clydesdale Road, W11 Clydesdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Codrington Mews, W11 This attractive L-shaped mews lies off Blenheim Crescent between Kensington Park Road and Ladbroke Grove.
Colville Gardens, W11 Colville Gardens was laid out in the 1870s by the builder George Frederick Tippett, who developed much of the rest of the neighbourhood.
Colville Houses, W11 Colville Houses is part of the Colville Conservation Area.
Colville Mews, W11 Colville Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Square, W11 Colville Square is a street in Notting Hill.
Colville Terrace, W11 Colville Terrace, W11 has strong movie connnections.
Convent Gardens, W11 Convent Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Cornwall Crescent, W11 Cornwall Crescent belongs to the third and final period of building on the Ladbroke estate.
Cornwall Road, W11 Cornwall Road was once the name for the westernmost part of Westbourne Park Road.
Courtnell Street, W2 Courtnell Street is a street in Paddington.
Dale Row, W11 Dale Row is a street in Notting Hill.
Dartmouth Close, W11 Dartmouth Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Dunworth Mews, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Elgin Mews, W11 Elgin Mews lies in Notting Hill.
Elkstone Road, W10 Elkstone Road replaced Southam Street around 1970.
Elmfield Way, W9 Elmfield Way is a street in Maida Vale.
Fallodon House, W11 Fallodon House was planned in 1973 to replace housing between Tavistock Crescent, Tavistock Road, and St Luke’s Road.
Faraday Road, W10 Faraday Road is one of the ’scientist’ roadnames of North Kensington.
Folly Mews, W11 Folly Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Golborne Mews, W10 Golborne Mews lies off of the Portobello Road, W10.
Golborne Road, W10 Golborne Road, heart of North Kensington, was named after Dean Golbourne, at one time vicar of St. John’s Church in Paddington.
Golden Mews, W11 Golden Mews was a tiny mews off of Basing Street, W11.
Great Western Road, W11 The name of the Great Western Road dates from the 1850s.
Hayden’s Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Hayden’s Place, W11 Haydens Place is a small cul-de-sac off of the Portobello Road.
Hayden’s Place, W11 Hayden’s Place is a street in Notting Hill.
Hedgegate Court, W11 Hedgegate Court is a street in Notting Hill.
Kensington Park Mews, W11 Kensington Park Mews lies off of Kensington Park Road, W11
Keyham House, W2 The twenty-storey Keyham House is on Westbourne Park Road.
Ladbroke Crescent, W11 Ladbroke Crescent belongs to the third and final great period of building on the Ladbroke estate and the houses were constructed in the 1860s.
Lancaster Road, W11 Lancaster Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Leamington House, W11 Leamington House was built by 1962.
Leamington Road Villas, W11 Leamington Road Villas is a street in Notting Hill.
Ledbury Road, W11 Ledbury Road is split between W2 and W11, the postal line intersecting the street.
Ledbury Road, W2 Ledbury Road is a street in Paddington.
Lonsdale Road, W11 Lonsdale Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Malton Mews, W10 Malton Mews, formerly Oxford Mews, runs south off of Cambridge Gardens.
McGregor Road, W11 McGregor Road runs between St Luke’s Road and All Saints Road.
Modena Street, W9 Modena Street was swept away in the late 1960s.
Moorhouse Road, W2 Moorhouse Road is a street in Paddington.
Morgan Road, W10 Morgan Road connects Wornington Road and St Ervans Road.
Munro Mews, W10 Munro Mews is a part cobbled through road that connects Wornington Road and Wheatstone Road.
Needham Road, W11 Needham Road was formerly Norfolk Road.
Orchard Close, W10 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the W10 postal area.
Pinehurst Court, W11 Pinehurst Court is a mansion block at 1-9 Colville Gardens.
Portishead House, W2 Portishead House is part of the Brunel Estate.
Portobello Road, W10 Portobello Road is split into two sections by the Westway/Hammersmith and City line.
Portobello Road, W11 Portobello Road is internationally famous for its market.
Powis Gardens, W11 Powis Gardens is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Mews, W11 Powis Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
Powis Square, W11 Powis Square is a square between Talbot Road and Colville Terrace.
Powis Terrace, W11 Powis Terrace is a street in Notting Hill.
Raddington Road, W10 Raddington Road is a street in North Kensington, London W10
Ruston Mews, W11 Ruston Mews, W11 was originally Crayford Mews.
Saint Marks Place, W11 This is a street in the W11 postcode area
Shottsford, W2 Shottsford is one of the buildings of the Wessex Gardens Estate.
Shrewsbury Road, W2 Shrewsbury Road is a street in Paddington.
Silvester Mews, W11 Silvester Mews was a mews off of Basing Street, W11.
St Columbs House, W10 St Columbs House is situated at 9-39 Blagrove Road.
St Ervans Road, W10 St Ervans Road is named after the home town of the Rev. Samuel Walker.
St John’s Mews, W11 St John’s Mews is a redeveloped mews off of Ledbury Road.
St Joseph’s Close, W10 St Joseph’s Close is a cul-de-sac off of Bevington Road.
St Lawrence Terrace, W10 St Lawrence Terrace is a street in North Kensington, London W10
St Lukes Mews, W11 St Lukes Mews is a mews off of All Saints Road, W11.
St Luke’s Mews, W11 St Luke’s Mews is a street in Notting Hill.
St Luke’s Road, W11 St Luke’s Road is a street in Notting Hill.
St Mark’s Close, W11 St Mark’s Close is a street in Notting Hill.
St Mark’s Place, W11 St Mark’s Place is situated on the site of the former Kensington Hippodrome.
St Mark’s Road, W11 St. Mark’s Road is a street in the Ladbroke conservation area.
St Michael’s Gardens, W10 St Michael’s Gardens lies to the south of St Michael’s Church.
Sutherland Place, W2 Sutherland Place is a street in Paddington.
Talbot Road, W11 The oldest part of Talbot Road lies in London, W11.
Talbot Road, W2 Talbot Road straddles the W2/W11 postcodes.
Tavistock Crescent, W11 Tavistock Crescent was where the first Notting Hill Carnival procession began on 18 September 1966.
Tavistock Mews, W11 Tavistock Mews, W11 lies off of the Portobello Road.
Tavistock Road, W11 Tavistock Road is a street in Notting Hill.
Telford Road, W10 Telford Road is one of the local streets named after prominent nineteenth century scientists.
Thorpe Close, W10 Thorpe Close is a redevelopment of the former Thorpe Mews, laid waste by the building of the Westway.
Wellington Close, W11 Wellington Close is a street in Notting Hill.
Westbourne Park Road, W11 Westbourne Park Road runs between Notting Hill and the Paddington area.
Westbury House, W11 Westbury House was built on the corner of Westbourne Park Road and Aldridge Road Villas in 1965.
Westway, W10 Westway is the A40(M) motorway which runs on an elevated section along the W10/W11 border.
Wheatstone Road, W10 Wheatstone Road was the former name of the eastern section of Bonchurch Road.
Wornington Road, W10 Wornington Road connected Golborne Road with Ladbroke Grove, though the Ladbroke end is now closed to through traffic.


Notting Hill

Notting Hill: A place whose fortunes have come, gone and come again...

Notting Hill is a cosmopolitan district known as the location for the annual Notting Hill Carnival, and for being home to the Portobello Road Market.

The word Notting might originate from a Saxon called Cnotta with the =ing part indicating "the place inhibited by the people of" - i.e. where Cnotta’s tribe lived. There was a farm called variously "Knotting-Bernes,", "Knutting-Barnes" or "Nutting-barns" and this name was transferred to the hill above it.

The area remained rural until the westward expansion of London reached Bayswater in the early 19th century. The main landowner in Notting Hill was the Ladbroke family, and from the 1820s James Weller Ladbroke began to undertake the development of the Ladbroke Estate. Working with the architect and surveyor Thomas Allason, Ladbroke began to lay out streets and houses, with a view to turning the area into a fashionable suburb of the capital (although the development did not get seriously under way until the 1840s). Many of these streets bear the Ladbroke name, including Ladbroke Grove, the main north-south axis of the area, and Ladbroke Square, the largest private garden square in London.

The original idea was to call the district Kensington Park, and other roads (notably Kensington Park Road and Kensington Park Gardens) are reminders of this. The local telephone prefix 7727 (originally 727) is based on the old telephone exchange name of PARk.

The reputation of the district altered over the course of the 20th century. As middle class households ceased to employ servants, the large Notting Hill houses lost their market and were increasingly split into multiple occupation.

For much of the 20th century the large houses were subdivided into multi-occupancy rentals. Caribbean immigrants were drawn to the area in the 1950s, partly because of the cheap rents, but were exploited by slum landlords like Peter Rachman, and also became the target of white racist Teddy Boys in the 1958 Notting Hill race riots.

Notting Hill was slowly gentrified from the 1980s onwards now has a contemporary reputation as an affluent and fashionable area; known for attractive terraces of large Victorian townhouses, and high-end shopping and restaurants (particularly around Westbourne Grove and Clarendon Cross).

A Daily Telegraph article in 2004 used the phrase the ’Notting Hill Set’ to refer to a group of emerging Conservative politicians, such as David Cameron and George Osborne, who were once based in Notting Hill.

Since it was first developed in the 1830s, Notting Hill has had an association with artists and ’alternative’ culture.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Children of Ruston Close
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Notting Hill
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Clayton Arms
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The Foresters
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The Lads of the Village pub
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The Prince of Wales
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Admiral Blake (The Cowshed)
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Pembridge Road (1900s)
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Kensington Park Hotel
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In the neighbourhood...

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Children of Ruston Close
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The Tile Kiln, Notting Dale (1824)
Credit: Florence Gladstone
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The Earl Derby stood on the corner of Southern Row and Bosworth Road. The Earl Derby himself was Thomas Stanley, 1st Earl of Derby who fought at the battle of Bosworth.
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Kensington Park Hotel
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The Tabernacle is a Grade II*-listed building in Powis Square, W11 built in 1887 as a church. Photographed here in 2010.
Credit: Asteuartw
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Duke of Cornwall, Ledbury Road W11, around 1990. Now The Ledbury restaurant, holder of 2 Michelin Stars as of 2014.
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St Peter's Notting Hill
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New flats featuring in a photo taken from Adair Road (1962)
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West end of Bevington Road, near to the Golborne Road junction - late 1950s or early 1960s.
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