Allcroft Road, NW5

Road in/near Kentish Town, existing between 1862 and now

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Road · Kentish Town · NW5 ·
APRIL
21
2021

Allcroft Road was built between 1862 and 1870 to links Queen’s Crescent with roads to the south.


The church of St Martin’s was built in 1865 at the expense of John D. Allcroft. Allcroft was a wealthy Shropshire gentleman who was concerned about the spiritual welfare of the hundreds of workers and artisans moving into the developing neighbourhood. A memorial to him was erected in the church after his death in 1893.

J. Sainsbury built an important North London depot in Allcroft Road in the 1880s.

After Second World War devastation in the area, the northern section of the road went under the bulldozer and disappeared.




Citation information: London Street Names (book)
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Alison   
Added: 26 Jun 2022 18:20 GMT   

On the dole in north London
When I worked at the dole office in Medina Road in the 1980s, "Archway" meant the social security offices which were in Archway Tower at the top of the Holloway Road. By all accounts it was a nightmare location for staff and claimants alike. This was when Margaret Thatcher’s government forced unemployment to rise to over 3 million (to keep wages down) and computerised records where still a thing of the future. Our job went from ensuring that unemployed people got the right sort and amount of benefits at the right time, to stopping as many people as possible from getting any sort of benefit at all. Britain changed irrevocably during this period and has never really recovered. We lost the "all in it together" frame of mind that had been born during the second world war and became the dog-eat-dog society where 1% have 95% of the wealth and many people can’t afford to feed their children. For me, the word Archway symbolises the land of lost content.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT


Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:39 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Born here
   
Added: 16 Nov 2022 12:38 GMT   

The Pearce family lived in Gardnor Road
The Pearce family moved into Gardnor Road around 1900 after living in Fairfax walk, my Great grandfather, wife and there children are recorded living in number 4 Gardnor road in the 1911 census, yet I have been told my grand father was born in number 4 in 1902, generations of the Pearce continue living in number 4 as well other houses in the road up until the 1980’s

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Lived here
Phil Stubbington   
Added: 14 Nov 2022 16:28 GMT   

Numbers 60 to 70 (1901 - 1939)
A builder, Robert Maeers (1842-1919), applied to build six houses on plots 134 to 139 on the Lincoln House Estate on 5 October 1901. He received approval on 8 October 1901. These would become numbers 60 to 70 Rodenhurst Road (60 is plot 139). Robert Maeers was born in Northleigh, Devon. In 1901 he was living in 118 Elms Road with his wife Georgina, nee Bagwell. They had four children, Allan, Edwin, Alice, and Harriet, born between 1863 and 1873.
Alice Maeers was married to John Rawlins. Harriet Maeers was married to William Street.
Three of the six houses first appear on the electoral register in 1904:
Daniel Mescal “Ferncroft”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By the 1905 electoral register all six are occupied:

Daniel Mescal “St Senans”
Henry Robert Honeywood “Grasmere”
John Rawlins “Iveydene”
William Francis Street “Hillsboro”
Walter Ernest Manning “St Hilda”
Henry Elkin “Montrose”

By 1906 house numbers replace names:

Daniel Mescal 70
Henry Robert Honeywood 68
John Rawlins 66
William Francis Street 64
Walter Ernest Manning 62
Henry Elkin 60

It’s not clear whether number 70 changed from “Ferncroft” to “St Senans” or possibly Daniel Mescal moved houses.

In any event, it can be seen that Robert Maeers’ two daughters are living in numbers 64 and 66, with, according to local information, an interconnecting door. In the 1911 census William Street is shown as a banker’s clerk. John Rawlins is a chartering clerk in shipping. Robert Maeers and his wife are also living at this address, Robert being shown as a retired builder.

By 1939 all the houses are in different ownership except number 60, where the Elkins are still in residence.


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Comment
stephen garraway   
Added: 13 Nov 2022 13:56 GMT   

Martin Street, Latimer Road
I was born at St Charlottes and lived at 14, Martin Street, Latimer Road W10 until I was 4 years old when we moved to the east end. It was my Nan Grant’s House and she was the widow of George Frederick Grant. She had two sons, George and Frederick, and one daughter, my mother Margaret Patricia.
The downstairs flat where we lived had two floors, the basement and the ground floor. The upper two floors were rented to a Scot and his family, the Smiths. He had red hair. The lights and cooker were gas and there was one cold tap over a Belfast sink. A tin bath hung on the wall. The toilet was outside in the yard. This was concreted over and faced the the rear of the opposite terraces. All the yards were segregated by high brick walls. The basement had the a "best" room with a large , dark fireplace with two painted metal Alsation ornaments and it was very dark, cold and little used.
The street lights were gas and a man came round twice daily to turn them on and off using a large pole with a hook and a lighted torch on the end. I remember men coming round the streets with carts selling hot chestnuts and muffins and also the hurdy gurdy man with his instrument and a monkey in a red jacket. I also remember the first time I saw a black man and my mother pulling me away from him. He had a Trilby and pale Mackintosh so he must of been one of the first of the Windrush people. I seem to recall he had a thin moustache.
Uncle George had a small delivery lorry but mum lost touch with him and his family. Uncle Fred went to Peabody Buildings near ST.Pauls.
My Nan was moved to a maisonette in White City around 1966, and couldn’t cope with electric lights, cookers and heating and she lost all of her neighbourhood friends. Within six months she had extreme dementia and died in a horrible ward in Tooting Bec hospital a year or so later. An awful way to end her life, being moved out of her lifelong neighbourhood even though it was slums.

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 31 Oct 2022 18:47 GMT   

Memories
I lived at 7 Conder Street in a prefab from roughly 1965 to 1971 approx - happy memories- sad to see it is no more ?

Reply

Eve Glover   
Added: 22 Oct 2022 09:28 GMT   

Shenley Road
Shenley Road is the main street in Borehamwood where the Job Centre and Blue Arrow were located

Reply
Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Benevolent Institution for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Journey The Benevolent Institution for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Journeymen was founded on 10 February 1837.
Kentish Town West Kentish Town West station opened on 1 April 1867 as ’Kentish Town’ and was renamed ’Kentish Town West’ on 2 June 1924.
Queen’s Crescent Market Queen’s Crescent Market is one of London’s oldest street markets, and is still held every Thursday and Saturday.
The Load of Hay The Load of Hay was established by 1721.

NEARBY STREETS
Aland Road, NW5 Aland Road was named after the Åland archipelago in the Baltic.
Allcroft Passage, NW5 Allcroft Passage was situated off of Allcroft Road.
Alma Street, NW5 Alma Street, like most ’Alma’ roads in London, marks the first battle of the Crimean War.
Arctic Street, NW5 Arctic Street was Franklin Street until 1937.
Ashdown Crescent, NW5 Ashdown Crescent commemorates its former landowner.
Ashdown Street, NW5 Ashdown Street, now demolished, was named after Edwin Ashdown.
Athlone Street, NW5 Athlone Street is named for Princess Alice, Countess of Athlone.
Azania Mews, NW5 Azania Mews is a road in the NW5 postcode area
Baptist Gardens, NW5 Baptist Gardens is a street in Kentish Town.
Barrington Close, NW5 Barrington Close is a road in the NW5 postcode area
Bassett Street, NW5 Bassett Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Cathcart Hill, NW5 Cathcart Hill is a road in the NW5 postcode area
Cathcart Street, NW5 Cathcart Street dates from 1856.
Chaston Place, NW5 Chaston Place is a street in Kentish Town.
Coity Road, NW5 This is a street in the NW5 postcode area
Cressfield Close, NW5 Cressfield Close is a street in Kentish Town.
Dalby Street, NW5 Dalby Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Deane House, NW5 Residential block
Dunboyne Road, NW3 Dunboyne Road is a street in Hampstead.
Eton Rise, NW3 Eton Rise is a street in Hampstead.
Eton Villas, NW3 Eton Villas is a street in Hampstead.
Gilden Crescent, NW5 Gilden Crescent is a road in the NW5 postcode area
Grafton Road, NW5 Grafton Road leaves Prince of Wales Road and takes a northwesterly trajectory to Kentish Town West and beyond.
Grafton Terrace, NW5 Grafton Terrace is a street in Kentish Town.
Haverstock Road, NW5 Haverstock Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Healey Street, NW1 Healey Street runs from Prince of Wales Road to Castle Road.
Herbert Street, NW5 Herbert Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Holmes Road, NW5 Holmes Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Inkerman Road, NW5 Inkerman Road is one of the ’Crimean’ streets of Kentish Town.
Kingsford Street, NW5 Kingsford Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Lismore Circus, NW5 Lismore Circus was a former Victorian circus with six streets radiating from it.
Maitland Park Road, NW3 Maitland Park Road is a street in Hampstead.
Maitland Park Villas, NW3 Maitland Park Villas is a street in Hampstead.
Malden Place, NW5 Malden Place is a street in Kentish Town.
Malden Road, NW5 Malden Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Mansfield Road, NW5 Mansfield Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Marsden Street, NW5 Marsden Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Modbury Gardens, NW5 Modbury Gardens is a street in Kentish Town.
Park Hill Road, NW3 Park Hill Road is a road in the NW3 postcode area
Parkhill Road, NW3 Parkhill Road is a street in Hampstead.
Parkhill Walk, NW3 This is a street in the NW3 postcode area
Perren Street, NW5 Perren Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Prince of Wales Road, NW1 Prince of Wales Road is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Prince of Wales Road, NW3 Prince of Wales Road is a street in Hampstead.
Quadrant Grove, NW5 Quadrant Grove is a street in Kentish Town.
Queen’s Crescent, NW5 Queen’s Crescent played a seminal role in the story of the Sainsbury’s supermarket chain.
Regis Road, NW5 Regis Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Rhyl Street, NW5 Rhyl Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Ryland Road, NW5 Ryland Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Southampton Road, NW3 Southampton Road is a street in Hampstead.
Southampton Road, NW5 Southampton Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Spring House, NW5 Spring House is a block on Spring Place.
Spring Place, NW5 Spring Place is a street in Kentish Town.
St Ann’s Gardens, NW5 St Ann’s Gardens lies off Queen’s Crescent.
Steeles Mews South, NW3 Steele’s Mews North lies opposite its southern namesake.
Steele’s Mews South, NW3 Steele’s Mews South runs off Steele’s Road, behind Haverstock Hill.
Talacre Road, NW5 Talacre Road was formerly Weedington Street.
Thurlow Terrace, NW5 Thurlow Terrace is a street in Kentish Town.
Truro Street, NW1 Truro Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Vicars Road, NW5 Vicars Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Warden Road, NW5 Warden Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Weedington Road, NW5 Weedington Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Wellesley Road, NW5 Wellesley Road is a street in Kentish Town.
Wilkin St Mews, NW5 Wilkin St Mews is a street in Kentish Town.
Wilkin Street Mews, NW5 Wilkin Street Mews is a street in Kentish Town.
Wilkin Street, NW5 Wilkin Street is a street in Kentish Town.
Willes Road, NW5 Willes Road honours Lieutenant-General James Willes, Commander of the Royal Marines during the Crimean War.
Woodyard Close, NW5 Woodyard Close is a road in the NW5 postcode area

NEARBY PUBS
The Load of Hay The Load of Hay was established by 1721.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 521 completed street histories and 46979 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Kentish Town

Kentish Town is first recorded during the reign of King John (1208) as Kentisston.

By 1456 Kentish Town was recognised as a thriving hamlet, and in this period a chapel of ease is recorded as being built for the inhabitants.

The early 19th century brought a lot of modernisation, causing a lot of the area’s rural charm, the River Fleet and the 18th century buildings to vanish.

Large amounts of land were purchased to build the first railway through the area, which can still be seen today. Kentish Town was a prime site for development as the Kentish Town Road was the main route for the growing city of London to the South.

1877 saw the beginning of mission work in the area as it was, by then, poor. The mission first held their services outside but as their funding increased they built a mission house, chapel, and vicarage.

In 1912 the Church of St Silas the Martyr was finally erected and consecrated, and by December of that year it became a parish in its own right.

Kentish Town was to see further modernisation in the post-World War II period. This means that there are few signs of 19th century influence left in the area.

Today Kentish Town is a busy shopping and business area. It offers libraries, gyms and other entertainments to visitors and its community.

The station was opened by the Midland Railway in 1868 on the extension to its new London terminal at St Pancras.

The separate London Underground station was opened on 22 June 1907 by the Charing Cross, Euston & Hampstead Railway (CCE&HR), a precursor of the Northern line. The station was designed by Leslie Green with the ox-blood red glazed terracotta facade and the semi-circular windows at first floor level common to most of the original stations on the CCE&HR and its two associated railways, the Baker Street & Waterloo Railway and Great Northern Piccadilly & Brompton Railway which opened the previous year.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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In the neighbourhood...

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London bus ticket issued from a Gibson ticket machine which were in use from 1953-1993
Credit: The Underground Map
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Entrance to the Fleet River, c. 1750
Credit: Samuel Scott
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'The Benevolent Institution for the Relief of Aged and Infirm Journeymen' was founded in Kentish Town on 10 February 1837. The asylum consisted of the chapel and ten houses; the dwelling at the south end being appropriated for the chaplain. Each house consisted of eight rooms, two being allotted to each pensioner. As reported in 1843, there were thirty-six male pensioners and their wives in the asylum. In addition to the apartments, each pensioner received 8 shillings a week plus coal.
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Two women walking past the graffiti ’No Evictions!’ on a railway bridge on Grafton Road, NW5. Much of the area was bulldozed and redeveloped in the 1960s and early 1970s.
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Haverstock Hill station in 1905 with its entrance on Lismore Circus.
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Spotted playing games with London Borough of Camden traffic wardens. Probably not recommended.
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Sainsbury’s open its first depot in Langford Mews, Kentish Town around 1880. This was where Sainsbury’s smoked bacon and had stabling and warehouses to supply the growing chain of Sainsbury stores until the Company’s headquarters moved to Blackfriars in 1891.
Credit: https://www.locallocalhistory.co.uk/
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Little Green Street sign
Credit: Wikimedia/IMS
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Betty Scott at her greengrocer stall outside 159 Queen’s Crescent, Kentish Town (1914)
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