Andrewes House, EC2Y

Block in/near Barbican

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(51.5185901 -0.0922471, 51.518 -0.092) 
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Block · Barbican · EC2Y ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Andrewes House is a block on Fore Street





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY



The Underground Map   
Added: 20 Sep 2020 13:01 GMT   

Pepys starts diary
On 1 January 1659, Samuel Pepys started his famous daily diary and maintained it for ten years. The diary has become perhaps the most extensive source of information on this critical period of English history. Pepys never considered that his diary would be read by others. The original diary consisted of six volumes written in Shelton shorthand, which he had learned as an undergraduate on scholarship at Magdalene College, Cambridge. This shorthand was introduced in 1626, and was the same system Isaac Newton used when writing.

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Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Graham O’Connell   
Added: 10 Apr 2021 10:24 GMT   

Lloyd & Sons, Tin Box Manufacturers (1859 - 1982)
A Lloyd & Sons occupied the wharf (now known as Lloyds Wharf, Mill Street) from the mid 19th Century to the late 20th Century. Best known for making tin boxes they also produced a range of things from petrol canisters to collecting tins. They won a notorious libel case in 1915 when a local councillor criticised the working conditions which, in fairness, weren’t great. There was a major fire here in 1929 but the company survived at least until 1982 and probably a year or two after that.

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Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

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Born here
Bernard Miller   
Added: 12 Apr 2022 17:36 GMT   

My mother and her sister were born at 9 Windsor Terrace
My mother, Millie Haring (later Miller) and her sister Yetta Haring (later Freedman) were born here in 1922 and 1923. With their parents and older brother and sister, they lived in two rooms until they moved to Stoke Newington in 1929. She always said there were six rooms, six families, a shared sink on the first floor landing and a toilet in the backyard.

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Born here
jack stevens   
Added: 26 Sep 2021 13:38 GMT   

Mothers birth place
Number 5 Whites Row which was built in around 1736 and still standing was the premises my now 93 year old mother was born in, her name at birth was Hilda Evelyne Shaw,

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Lived here
margaret clark   
Added: 15 Oct 2021 22:23 GMT   

Margaret’s address when she married in 1938
^, Josepine House, Stepney is the address of my mother on her marriage certificate 1938. Her name was Margaret Irene Clark. Her father Basil Clark was a warehouse grocer.

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Comment
   
Added: 6 Nov 2021 15:03 GMT   

Old Nichol Street, E2
Information about my grandfather’s tobacconist shop

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Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

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Comment
MCNALLY    
Added: 17 May 2021 09:42 GMT   

Blackfriars (1959 - 1965)
I lived in Upper Ground from 1959 to 1964 I was 6 years old my parents Vince and Kitty run the Pub The Angel on the corner of Upper Ground and Bodies Bridge. I remember the ceiling of the cellar was very low and almost stretched the length of Bodies Bridge. The underground trains run directly underneath the pub. If you were down in the cellar when a train was coming it was quite frightening

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Martin Eaton    
Added: 14 Oct 2021 03:56 GMT   

Boundary Estate
Sunbury, Taplow House.

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STEPHEN JACKSON   
Added: 14 Nov 2021 17:25 GMT   

Fellows Court, E2
my family moved into the tower block 13th floor (maisonette), in 1967 after our street Lenthall rd e8 was demolished, we were one of the first families in the new block. A number of families from our street were rehoused in this and the adjoining flats. Inside toilet and central heating, all very modern at the time, plus eventually a tarmac football pitch in the grounds,(the cage), with a goal painted by the kids on the brick wall of the railway.

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The Underground Map   
Added: 8 Mar 2021 15:05 GMT   

A plague on all your houses
Aldgate station is built directly on top of a vast plague pit, where thousands of bodies are apparently buried. No-one knows quite how many.

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Tom   
Added: 21 May 2021 23:07 GMT   

Blackfriars
What is, or was, Bodies Bridge?

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Comment
   
Added: 21 Apr 2021 16:21 GMT   

Liverpool Street
the Bishopsgate station has existed since 1840 as a passenger station, but does not appear in the site’s cartography. Evidently, the 1860 map is in fact much earlier than that date.

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Lived here
Katharina Logan   
Added: 9 Aug 2022 19:01 GMT   

Ely place existed in name in 1857
On 7th July 1857 John James Chase and Mary Ann Weekes were married at St John the Baptist Hoxton, he of full age and she a minor. Both parties list their place of residence as Ely Place, yet according to other information, this street was not named until 1861. He was a bricklayer, she had no occupation listed, but both were literate and able to sign their names on their marriage certificate.

Source: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSF7-Q9Y7?cc=3734475

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Comment
Reginald John Gregory   
Added: 8 Aug 2022 14:07 GMT   

Worked in the vicinity of my ancestor’s house,
Between the years 1982-1998 (unknown to me at the time) I worked in an office close to the site of my ancestors cottage. I discovered this when researching family history - the cottage was mentioned in the 1871 census for Colindeep Lane/Ancient Street coming up from the Hyde. The family lived in the ares betwen 1805 and 1912.

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Barry J. Page   
Added: 27 Jul 2022 19:41 GMT   

Highbury Corner V1 Explosion
Grandma described the V1 explosion at Highbury Corner on many occasions. She was working in the scullery when the flying bomb landed. The blast shattered all the windows in the block of flats and blew off the bolt on her front door. As she looked out the front room window, people in various states of injury and shock were making their way along Highbury Station Road. One man in particular, who was bleeding profusely from glass shard wounds to his neck, insisted in getting home to see if his family was all right. Others were less fortunate. Len, the local newsagent, comforted a man, who had lost both legs caused by the blast, until the victim succumbed to his injuries. The entire area was ravaged and following are statistics. The flying bomb landed during lunch hour (12:46 p.m.) on June 27th 1944. 26 people lost their lives, 84 were seriously injured and 71 slightly injured.

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Comment
ANON   
Added: 20 Jul 2022 13:36 GMT   

The Square & Ashmore park
The Square and Ashmore park was the place to be 2000-2005. Those were the greatest times on the estate. everyday people were playing out. the park was full of kids just being kids and having fun, now everyone is grown up and only bump into eachother when heading to the shops or work. I miss the good days( Im 25yrs old as im writing this)

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Spotted here
   
Added: 18 Jul 2022 13:56 GMT   

Map of Thornsett Road Esrlsfield


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Born here
Carolyn Hirst   
Added: 16 Jul 2022 15:21 GMT   

Henry James Hirst
My second great grandfather Henry James Hirst was born at 18 New Road on 11 February 1861. He was the eighth of the eleven children of Rowland and Isabella Hirst. I think that this part of New Road was also known at the time as Gloucester Terrace.

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Lived here
Richard   
Added: 12 Jul 2022 21:36 GMT   

Elgin Crescent, W11
Richard Laitner (1955-1983), a barrister training to be a doctor at UCL, lived here in 1983. He was murdered aged 28 with both his parents after attending his sister’s wedding in Sheffield in 1983. The Richard Laitner Memorial Fund maintains bursaries in his memory at UCL Medical School

Source: Ancestry Library Edition

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Comment
Anthony Mckay   
Added: 11 Jul 2022 00:12 GMT   

Bankfield Cottages, Ass House Lane, Harrow Weald
Bankfield Cottages (now demolished) at the end of Ass House Lane, appear twice in ’The Cheaters’ televison series (made 1960) in the episodes ’The Fine Print’ and ’Tine to Kill’

Source: THE CHEATERS: Episode Index

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Golden Lane Estate, EC1Y The Golden Lane Housing Estate is a 1950s council housing complex in the City of London.
Half Moon Court, EC1A Halfmoon Court is the southern most of five passages leading eastward from Kinghorn Street.
Old Dick Whittington The Dick Whittington Inn at 24 Cloth Fair was a sixteenth century building and once part of a row of medieval buildings lining the street.
St Bartholomew’s Hospital St Bartholomew’s Hospital, also known simply as Barts and later more formally as The Royal Hospital of St Bartholomew, is a hospital located at Smithfield in the City of London and founded in 1123.
St Michael-le-Querne St Michael-le-Querne, also called St Michael ad Bladum, was a parish church in the Farringdon Within Ward in the City of London.

NEARBY STREETS
Adams Court, EC2N Adam’s Court is thought to be named for Sir Thomas Adams.
Addle Street, EC2V Addle Street, there from ancient times, was a victim of the bulldozer after the Second World War.
Albion Way, EC1A Albion Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Aldermanbury Square, EC2V At the centre of Saxon London, the aldermen (elder statesmen of City wards) met in a ’bury’ (house) in a time before the Guildhall was built.
Aldermanbury, EC2V Aldermanbury is the Saxon name for ’Eldermen’ (elder statesmen) and ’bury’ (house).
Aldersgate Street, EC1A Aldersgate Street is located on the west side of the Barbican Estate.
Andrewes Highwalk, EC2Y Andrewes Highwalk is named for Lancelot Andrewes, rector of the nearby St Giles-without-Cripplegate Church.
Angel Court, EC2R Angel Court is named after a long demolished inn of this name.
Angel Street, EC1A Angel Street runs between King Edward Street in the west and St Martin’s Le Grand in the east.
Austin Friars, EC2N Austin Friars was an Augustinian friary from its foundation in the 1260s, until its dissolution in 1538.
Bartholomew Close, EC1A Bartholomew Close is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Bartholomew Passage, EC1A Bartholomew Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Bartholomew Place, EC1A Bartholomew Place is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Basinghall Avenue, EC2V Basinghall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Basinghall Street, EC2V Basinghall Street joins Gresham Street to the south.
Bassishaw Highwalk, EC2V Bassishaw Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bastion Highwalk, EC2Y Bastion Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Beech Street, EC2Y Beech Street is the western extension of Chiswell Street.
Bells Alley, EC2N Bells Alley is a road in the SW6 postcode area
Blomfield Street, EC2M Blomfield Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bornhill Street, EC2A Bornhill Street is a location in London.
Brackley Street, EC2Y Brackley Street was named after Viscount Brackley - the title given to the eldest sons of the Earl of Bridgewater who owned a townhouse on Bridgewater Square.
Bradford Avenue, EC2Y Bradford Avenue was a street of warehouses.
Brandon Mews, EC2Y Brandon Mews is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Brewers Hall Gardens, EC2V Brewers Hall Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Bridgewater Square, EC2Y Bridgewater Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Broad Street Place, EC2M Broad Street Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Bryer Court, EC2Y Bryer Court is a block on Bridgewater Square
Bull and Mouth Street, EC2V Bull and Mouth Street ran between King Edward Street and St Martin’s Le Grand.
Carey Lane, EC2V Carey Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Carthusian Street, EC1A Carthusian Street is a road in the EC1A postcode area
Charterhouse Square, EC1M Charterhouse Square is the largest courtyard associated with London Charterhouse, mostly formed of Tudor and Stuart architecture restored after the Blitz.
Cherry Tree Walk, EC1Y Cherry Tree Walk is a road in the EC1Y postcode area
Chiswell Street, EC1Y Chiswell Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Christopher Street, EC2A Christopher Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Cloth Court, EC1M Cloth Court is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Cloth Fair, EC1A Cloth Fair stands where the original Bartholomew Fair was held in medieval times.
Cloth Street, EC1M Cloth Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Coleman Street, EC2V Coleman Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Compter Passage, EC2V Compter Passage is a location in London.
Copthall Avenue, EC2N Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Copthall Avenue, EC2R Copthall Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Cripplegate Street, EC1Y Cripplegate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Defoe House, EC2Y Defoe House is a block on Beech Street
Dominion Street, EC2M Dominion Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Drapers Gardens, EC2N Drapers Gardens is a block in Copthall Avenue.
East Market, EC2Y East Market is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
East Passage, EC1A East Passage is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Eldon Street, EC2M Eldon Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Errol Street, EC1Y Errol Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Fann Street, EC1Y Fann Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Ferroners House, EC2Y Ferroners House
Finsbury Avenue, EC2M Finsbury Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus Gardens, EC2M Finsbury Circus Gardens is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Circus, EC2M Finsbury Circus is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Finsbury Court, EC2A Finsbury Court was obliterated in a redevelopment programme taking in Finsbury Pavement.
Finsbury Pavement, EC2M Finsbury Pavement was the first pavement of firm ground north of the marshy Moorfields.
Finsbury Square, EC2A Finsbury Square is a 0.7-hectare square in central London which includes a six-rink grass bowling green.
Finsbury Street, EC2A Finsbury Street is a road in the EC2Y postcode area
Florin Court, EC1M Florin Court is a block on Charterhouse Square
Fore Street Avenue, EC2Y Fore Street Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fore Street, EC2Y Fore Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Fortune Street, EC1Y Fortune Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1Y postal area.
Foster Lane, EC2V Foster Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Founders Court, EC2R Founders Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Gilbert Bridge, EC2Y Gilbert Bridge is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Gilbert House, EC2Y Gilbert House is a block on Gilbert Bridge
Glasshouse Yard, EC2Y Glasshouse Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Goldsmith Street, EC2V Goldsmith Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Great Swan Alley, EC2R Great Swan Alley is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Great Winchester Street, EC2N Great Winchester Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Gresham Street, EC2V Gresham Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Guildhall Buildings, EC2V Guildhall Buildings is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Guildhall Yard, EC2V Guildhall Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Gutter Lane, EC2V Gutter Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Haven Road, RM13 Haven Road is a location in London.
Hayne Street, EC1A Hayne Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Honey Lane, EC2V Honey Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place, EC2Y Ironmongers Hall Shaftesbury Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
King Edward Street, EC1A King Edward Street runs from Newgate Street in the south to Little Britain in the north.
Kinghorn Street, EC1A Kinghorn Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Kings Arms Yard, EC2R Kings Arms Yard is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
King’s Arms Yard, EC2R King’s Arms Yard runs east from Moorgate Street.
Lackington Street, EC2M Lackington Street is a road in the EC2A postcode area
Lamb’s Passage, EC1Y Lamb’s Passage was formerly Great Swordbearers (Sword Bearers) Alley.
Lauderdale Tower, EC2Y Lauderdale Tower is the westernmost tower in the Barbican, facing onto Lauderdale Place.
Lawrence Lane, EC2V Lawrence Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Lindsey Street, EC1A Lindsey Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Little Britain, EC1A Little Britain is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Little Britain, EC1M Little Britain is one of the streets of London in the EC1M postal area.
London Wall, EC2M London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
London Wall, EC2Y London Wall is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Long Lane, EC1A Long Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Lothbury, EC2R Lothbury is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Love Lane, EC2V Love Lane is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Mason’s Avenue, EC2V A street within the EC2V postcode
Middle Street, EC1A Middle Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Middlesex Passage, EC1A Middlesex Passage is a location in London.
Milk Street, EC2V Milk Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Milton Court, EC2Y Milton Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Milton Street, EC2Y Milton Street was formerly known as Grub Street.
Mitre Court, EC2V Mitre Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Monkwell Square, EC2Y Monkwell Square is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields Highwalk, EC2Y Moorfields Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorfields, EC2Y Moorfields is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Moorgate Hall, EC2M Moorgate Hall is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate Place, EC2R Moorgate Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
Moorgate, EC2M Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Moorgate, EC2R Moorgate is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
New Broad Street, EC2M New Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
New Union Street, EC2Y New Union Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Newbury Street, EC1A Newbury Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Newgate Street, EC1A Newgate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Newgate Street, EC2V Newgate Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Noble Street, EC2V Noble Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Oat Lane, EC2V Oat Lane has been marked on London maps since 1600 and before.
Old Broad Street, EC2N Old Broad Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
One Ropemaker Street, EC2Y One Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Pickax Street, EC2Y Pickax Street once ran from Long Lane to Goswell Road (which before 1864 was called Goswell Street).
Priest’s Court, EC2V Priest?s Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Primrose Street, EC2A Primrose Street is a location in London.
Queen Isabella Way, EC1A Queen Isabella Way is one of the streets of London in the EC1A postal area.
Red Cross Street, EC2Y Red Cross Street once ran to the junction of Beech Street and Golden Lane.
Roman House, EC2Y Roman House is a location in London.
Ropemaker Street, EC2M Ropemaker Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Salisbury House, EC2M Salisbury House can be found on London Wall
Seddon Highwalk, EC2Y Seddon Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Silk Street, EC2Y Silk Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Silver Street, EC2V Silver Street was the location of a house in which William Shakespeare lived during his time in London.
South Place, EC2M South Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
St Alphage Garden, EC2Y St Alphage Garden is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
St Ann’s Lane, EC2V St Ann’s Lane was the name for the west end of Gresham Street until the 1860s.
St Giles Terrace, EC2Y St Giles Terrace lies alongside St Giles Cripplegate church.
St Martin’s Le Grand, EC2V St Martin’s Le Grand is a street north of Newgate Street and a former liberty within the City of London
St. Alphage Highwalk, EC2V St Alphage Highwalk is part of the Barbican.
Stock Exchange Building, EC2N Stock Exchange Building is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Sun Street, EC2M Sun Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Telegraph Street, EC2R Telegraph Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2R postal area.
The Charterhouse, EC1M Residential block
The Postern, EC2Y The Postern is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Thomas More Highwalk, EC2Y Thomas More Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Three Nun Court, EC2V Three Nun Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Throgmorton Avenue, EC2N Throgmorton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Throgmorton Street, EC3V The name of Throgmorton Street is a corruption of the name of Nicholas Throckmorton, Elizabeth I’s ambassador to France and Scotland.
Tokenhouse Yard, EC2R Tokenhouse Yard marked the site of the manufacturer of tokens that were used as the copper coinage of England before the reign of James I.
Wallside, EC2Y Wallside is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Warnford Court, EC2N Warnford Court is one of the streets of London in the EC2N postal area.
Whitecross Place, EC2M Whitecross Place is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Willoughby Highwalk, EC2Y Willoughby Highwalk is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2A Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2A postal area.
Wilson Street, EC2M Wilson Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2M postal area.
Wood Street, EC2V Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2V postal area.
Wood Street, EC2Y Wood Street is one of the streets of London in the EC2Y postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Addiscombe Line This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Amber Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Austin Friars This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Balls Brothers Ltd This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bottlescrue This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Circle Bar, Level 0 This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
City Golf & Health Clubs This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Club Gascon This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Corney & Barrow, Unit 3, Stock Exch This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Davy’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Enoteca Rabezzana This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox Fine Wines This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Hand & Shears This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Harry’s Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Jamies This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
La Tasca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Le Paris Grill This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Old Dick Whittington The Dick Whittington Inn at 24 Cloth Fair was a sixteenth century building and once part of a row of medieval buildings lining the street.
Old Red Cow This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Piano Smithfield This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Runnymede This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sabor Iberico This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Searcys Bars @ GSM & D This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Slug and Lettuce This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sutton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Anthologist This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Arbitrager This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Fleetwood This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Flying Horse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Gable This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Globe This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Jugged Hare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Lord Raglan This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Paternoster This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rack & Tenter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Red Lion This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Rising Sun This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Shakespeare This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Telegraph This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Tokenhouse The Tokenhouse is named for the nearby manufacturer of tokens that were used as the copper coinage of England before the 1680s.
Unknown as yet This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wood Street Bar and Restaurant This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Barbican

The Barbican is a residential estate built during the 1960s and the 1970s in the City of London.

During World War II, the City suffered serious damage and loss of life. The Cripplegate ward was virtually demolished and by 1951 the resident population of the City stood at 5,324 of whom 48 lived in Cripplegate. Discussions began in 1952 about the future of the site, and the decision to build new residential properties was taken by the Court of Common Council on 19 September 1957.

The estate was built between 1965 and 1976, on a 35-acre site that had been bombed in World War II. The complex was designed by architects Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, whose first work was the ground-breaking Golden Lane Estate immediately north of the Barbican. The estate of 40 acres was officially opened in 1969 and is now home to around 4000 people living in 2014 flats. The flats reflect the widespread use in Britain in the 1960s and 1970s of concrete as the visible face of the building.

It contains, or is adjacent to, the Barbican Arts Centre, the Museum of London, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, the Barbican public library and the City of London School for Girls, forming the Barbican Complex. The complex is a prominent example of British brutalist architecture and is Grade II listed as a whole with the exception of the former Milton Court. Milton Court once contained a fire station, medical facilities and some flats and was demolished to allow the construction of a new apartment complex which also contains additional facilities for the Guildhall School of Music and Drama.

The residential estate consists of 13 terrace blocks, grouped around a lake and green squares. The main buildings rise up to seven floors above a podium level, which links all the facilities in the Barbican, providing a pedestrian route above street level. Some maisonettes are built into the podium structure. There is no vehicular access within the estate, but there are some car parks at the periphery of the estate. Public car parks are located within the Barbican Centre.

What is now Barbican station was opened by the Metropolitan Railway in December 1865 when they extended their original route between Paddington and Farringdon.

The station was first called Aldersgate Street, this being the name of the street on which it stands. This changed to Aldersgate on 1 November 1910, then to Aldersgate and Barbican in 1923, and to the present name from 1 December 1968.

The station replaced an earlier building at 134 Aldersgate Street, which for many years had a sign claiming ’This was Shakespeare’s House’. Although the building was very close to the nearby Fortune Playhouse, there is no documentary evidence that Shakespeare lived here; a subsidy roll from 1598 shows a William Shakespeare as owner of the property, but there is nothing to indicate that it is the playwright.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
TUM image id: 1653840363
Licence: CC BY 2.0
St Lukes Hospital for Lunatics, London
TUM image id: 1554045418
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Amen Court, EC4M
TUM image id: 1493474208
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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Bank station
Credit: IG/steven.maddison
Licence: CC BY 2.0


"Cheapside and Bow Church" engraved by W. Albutt (1837) First published in The History of London: Illustrated by Views in London and Westminster. Steel engraved print after a picture by T.H. Shepherd.
Credit: W. Albutt
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The gravestone of English poet William Blake in Bunhill Fields Burial Ground
Credit: https://careergappers.com/
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Great Arthur House, at the centre of the Golden Lane Estate, was the tallest residential building in Britain at the time of its construction.
Credit: Steve F/Wiki commons
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Church of All Hallows Lombard Street as seen from Ball Alley in the 1820s. All Hallows was a rare City of London church not demolished due to the Great Fire or the Blitz but to falling attendances. Taken from ’The Churches of London’ by George Godwin (1839)
Credit: Robert William Billings and John Le Keux
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At the corner of Clerkenwell Road and Goswell Road sits the Hat and Feathers. It was built on the site of an earlier tavern around 1860 for owner James Leask. It was designed by William Finch Hill who specialised in music halls and pubs.
Credit: Ewan Munro
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The shoemaker was a 1907 London comedy drama, a play "full of tears and laughter."
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No 37 Cheapside on the corner of Friday Street (c.1880) The ’Society for Photographing Relics of Old London’ was formed when the Oxford Arms - a traditional galleried pub - was about to be pulled down as part of the new Old Bailey development in 1875. The society subsequently campaigned to record disappearing sights, hurriedly commissioning photographs to capture buildings for posterity. Between 1875 and 1886 they produced photographic records of further buildings under threat, which were issued with descriptive text by the painter (and founder of the Society) Alfred Marks. The focus was architectural, not social; the photographs deliberately exclude signs, notices, people and traffic, to concentrate on the appearance of the bricks and mortar. Few of the streets in their images remain. This section of Friday Street was demolished after the Second World War.
Credit: Society for Photographing Relics of Old London
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Lombard Court EC3
Licence: CC BY 2.0


A view of Cornhill, Lombard Street and the Mansion House in the City of London (1810)
Credit: Ackermann’s Repository
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