Battersea Church Road, SW11

Road in/near Battersea

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(51.47745 -0.17394, 51.477 -0.173) 
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Road · Battersea · SW11 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Battersea Church Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.





CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

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Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

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Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

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old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

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Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

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Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

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Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

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Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

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fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

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Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

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Lived here
Norman Norrington   
Added: 8 Jun 2021 08:08 GMT   

Blechynden Street, W10
Lived here #40 1942-1967

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NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea Farm Chelsea Farm was established on the northern banks of the Thames on land previously open to common pasturage after the annual harvest.
Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens, with a vestige existing today, was in its prime between 1846 and 1877.
Lots Road Power Station Lots Road Power Station was a coal (and later oil-fired then gas-fired) power station, which supplied electricity to the London Underground system.

NEARBY STREETS
Albion Riverside Building, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Albion Riverside, SW11 Albion Riverside is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Althorpe Mews, SW11 Althorpe Mews is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Anhalt Road, SW11 Anhalt Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ashburnham Road, SW10 Ashburnham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Battersea Bridge Road, SW11 The laying out of Battersea Bridge Road took place in several phases between the 1770s and 1850s.
Battersea Bridge, SW11 Battersea Bridge connects Battersea and Chelsea with the first bridge dating from 1771.
Battersea Square, SW11 Battersea Square is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Blomfield Court, SW11 Blomfield Court is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Bolingbroke Walk, SW11 Bolingbroke Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Bridge Lane, SW11 Bridge Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Burnaby Street, SW10 Burnaby Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Wharf, SW10 Chelsea Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Condray Place, SW11 Condray Place is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Cotswold Mews, SW11 Cotswold Mews is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Cremorne Road, SW10 Cremorne Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Damer Terrace, SW10 Damer Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Eaton House, SW11 Eaton House is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Edna Street, SW11 Edna Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Elcho Street, SW11 Elcho Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ethelburga Street, SW11 Ethelburga Street was named after Saint Æthelburh (Ethelburga), founder and first Abbess of Barking.
Granfield Street, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Great Eastern Wharf, SW11 Great Eastern Wharf is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Harbour Yard, SW10 Harbour Yard is a block in Imperial Wharf.
Henning Street, SW11 Henning Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Henty Close, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Hester Road, SW11 Hester Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Howie Street, SW11 Howie Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Hyde Lane, SW11 Hyde Lane is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Juer Street, SW11 Juer Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Kingswater Place, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Lots Road, SW10 Lots Road, older than the surrounding streets, was once Pooles Lane which was a track leading to Chelsea Farm.
Maskelyne Close, SW11 Maskelyne Close is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Octavia Street, SW11 Octavia Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Old Garden House, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Old School House, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Orbel Street, SW11 Orbel Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Park South, SW11 Park South is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkgate Road, SW11 Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Parkham Street, SW11 Parkham Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Paveley Drive, SW11 Paveley Drive is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Radstock Street, SW11 Radstock Street is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Rainsome Dock, SW11 Rainsome Dock is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Randall Close, SW11 Randall Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Ransomes Dock Business Centre, SW11 Ransomes Dock Business Centre is a block on Parkgate Road.
Ransomes Dock, SW11 Ransomes Dock is a development in Battersea.
Riverside, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Searles Close, SW11 Searles Close is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Sphere Walk, SW11 Sphere Walk is a location in London.
Stadium Street, SW10 Stadium Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Sunbury Lane, SW11 Sunbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Surrey Lane Estate, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Surrey Lane, SW11 Surrey Lane is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Thames Avenue, SW10 Thames Avenue is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Thames Towpath, SW10 Thames Towpath is a road in the SW10 postcode area
The Lanterns, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
The Parkgate Road, SW11 The Parkgate Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
The Quad, SW11 A street within the SW11 postcode
Thorney Crescent, SW11 Thorney Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Trott Street, SW11 Trott Street connects Battersea High Street with Shuttleworth Road.
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Ursula Street, SW11 Ursula Street is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Valiant House, SW11 Residential block
Vicarage Crescent, SW11 Vicarage Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Vicarage Walk, SW11 Vicarage Walk is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Waterfront Drive, SW10 Waterfront Drive is a location in London.
Watford Close, SW11 Watford Close is a small street on the Ethelburga Estate.
Westbridge Road, SW11 Westbridge Road is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Whistlers Avenue, SW11 Whistlers Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW11 postal area.
Worfield Street, SW11 Worfield Street runs north from Rosenau Road towards Parkgate Road.

NEARBY PUBS
Le Quecum Bar This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Prince Albert This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Union Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Battersea

Battersea is an area of the London Borough of Wandsworth, England. It is an inner-city district on the south side of the River Thames.

Battersea covers quite a wide area - it spans from Fairfield in the west to Queenstown in the east. Battersea is mentioned in Anglo-Saxon times as Badrices ieg = Badric's Island.

Although in modern times it is known mostly for its wealth, Battersea remains characterised by economic inequality, with council estates being surrounded by more prosperous areas.

Battersea was an island settlement established in the river delta of the Falconbrook; a river that rises in Tooting Bec Common and flowed through south London to the River Thames.

As with many former Thames island settlements, Battersea was reclaimed by draining marshland and building culverts for streams.

Before the Industrial Revolution, much of the area was farmland, providing food for the City of London and surrounding population centres; and with particular specialisms, such as growing lavender on Lavender Hill, asparagus (sold as 'Battersea Bundles') or pig breeding on Pig Hill (later the site of the Shaftesbury Park Estate).

At the end of the 18th century, above 300 acres of land in the parish of Battersea were occupied by some 20 market gardeners, who rented from five to near 60 acres each.

Villages in the wider area - Battersea, Wandsworth, Earlsfield (hamlet of Garratt), Tooting, Balham - were isolated one from another; and throughout the second half of the second millennium, the wealthy built their country retreats in Battersea and neighbouring areas.

Industry developed eastwards along the bank of the Thames during the industrial revolution from 1750s onwards; the Thames provided water for transport, for steam engines and for water-intensive industrial processes. Bridges erected across the Thames encouraged growth; Battersea Bridge was built in 1771. Inland from the river, the rural agricultural community persisted.

Battersea was radically altered by the coming of railways. The London and Southampton Railway Company was the first to drive a railway line from east to west through Battersea, in 1838, terminating at Nine Elms at the north west tip of the area. Over the next 22 years five other lines were built, across which all trains from Waterloo Station and Victoria Station ran. An interchange station was built in 1863 towards the north west of the area, at a junction of the railway. Taking the name of a fashionable village a mile and more away, the station was named Clapham Junction.

During the latter decades of the nineteenth century Battersea had developed into a major town railway centre with two locomotive works at Nine Elms and Longhedge and three important motive power depots (Nine Elms, Stewarts Lane and Battersea) all situated within a relatively small area in the north of the district.

A population of 6000 people in 1840 was increased to 168 000 by 1910; and save for the green spaces of Battersea Park, Clapham Common, Wandsworth Common and some smaller isolated pockets, all other farmland was built over, with, from north to south, industrial buildings and vast railway sheds and sidings (much of which remain), slum housing for workers, especially north of the main east–west railway, and gradually more genteel residential terraced housing further south.

The railway station encouraged local government to site its buildings - the town hall, library, police station, court and post office in the area surrounding Clapham Junction.

All this building around the station marginalised Battersea High Street (the main street of the original village) into no more than an extension of Falcon Road.


LOCAL PHOTOS
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
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Battersea Bridge (1860s)
Credit: James Hedderly
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens
Credit: Phoebus Levin (1864)
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Battersea High Street
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Winders Road
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
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Battersea Bridge, a painting by John Atkinson Grimshaw (1885)
Credit: The Maas Gallery
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Albert Bridge Road at the former end of Ethelburga Street (1958)
Credit: Gwyneth Wexler
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0
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