Camera Place, SW10

Road in/near Chelsea

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Road · Chelsea · SW10 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Camera Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.





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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Richard Lake   
Added: 28 Sep 2022 09:37 GMT   

Trade Union Official
John William Lake snr moved with his family to 22 De Laune Street in 1936. He was the London Branch Secretary for the Street Masons, Paviours and Road Makers Union. He had previously lived in Orange St now Copperfield St Southwark but had been forced to move because the landlord didn’t like him working from home and said it broke his lease.
John William snr died in 1940. His son John William Lake jnr also became a stone mason and at the end of World War two he was responsible for the engraving of the dates of WW2 onto the Cenotaph in Whitehall.

Reply
Lived here
Julie   
Added: 22 Sep 2022 18:30 GMT   

Well Walk, NW3 (1817 - 1818)
The home of Benthy, the Postman, with whom poet John Keats and his brother Tom lodged from early 1817 to Dec., 1818. They occupied the first floor up. Here Tom died Dec. 1, 1818. It was next door to the Welles Tavern then called ’The Green Man’."

From collected papers and photos re: No. 1 Well Walk at the library of Harvard University.

Source: No. 1, Well Walk, Hampstead. | HOLLIS for

Reply
Comment
   
Added: 4 Sep 2022 15:42 GMT   

Superman 2
I worked here in 1977. The scene in the prison laundry in Superman 2 was filmed here.

Reply

TUM   
Added: 27 Aug 2022 10:22 GMT   

The Underground Map
Michael Faraday successfully demonstrated the first electrical transformer at the Royal Institute, London.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 15:19 GMT   

Bus makes a leap
A number 78 double-decker bus driven by Albert Gunter was forced to jump an accidentally opening Tower Bridge.

He was awarded a £10 bonus.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:44 GMT   

The world’s first underground train
The very first underground train left Paddington on the new Metropolitan Railway bound for Farringdon Street.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:41 GMT   

Baker Street
Baker Street station opened on the Metropolitan Railway - the world’s first underground line.

Reply

Admin   
Added: 26 Aug 2022 12:17 GMT   

TV comes to Olympia
Over 7000 people queued to see the first high definition television pictures on sets at the Olympia Radio Show. The pictures were transmitted by the BBC from Alexandra Palace, introduced by Leslie Mitchell, their first announcer.

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Chelsea Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

NEARBY STREETS
Ann Lane, SW10 Ann Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Battersea Bridge, SW3 Battersea Bridge, a five-span arch bridge with cast-iron girders and granite piers links Battersea south of the River Thames with Chelsea to the north.
Beaufort Street, SW3 Beaufort Street was laid out in 1766 on the site of Beaufort House.
Blantyre Street, SW10 Blantyre Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Callow Street, SW3 Callow Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Carlyle Square, SW3 Carlyle Square was named in honour of the writer Thomas Carlyle in 1872.
Carmichael Close, SW10 A street within the SW10 postcode
Cathcart Road, SW10 Cathcart Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Cavaye Place, SW10 Cavaye Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chapel Walk, SW3 Chapel Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Chelsea Crescent, SW10 Chelsea Crescent is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Chelsea Park Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Park Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW10 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Danvers Street, SW3 Sir John Danvers (died 1655) introduced Italian gardens to England in his mansion Danvers House whose grounds spread from the river to the Kings Road.
Dartrey Tower, SW10 Dartrey Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
East Road, SW10 East Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
East Terrace, SW10 East Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Edith Terrace, SW10 Edith Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Edith Yard Edith Grove, SW10 Edith Yard Edith Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Gardens, SW10 Elm Park Gardens links Fulham Road with Elm Park Road.
Elm Park Lane, SW10 Elm Park Lane is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Elm Park Mansions, SW10 Elm Park Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Elm Park Road, SW3 Elm Park Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Esher House, SW10 Residential block
Evelyn Gardens, SW7 Evelyn Gardens is a road in the SW7 postcode area
Farrier Walk, SW10 Farrier Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Fawcett Street, SW10 Fawcett Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Close, SW10 Fernshaw Close is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fernshaw Road, SW10 Fernshaw Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Fulham Road, SW10 Fulham Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gertrude Street, SW10 Gertrude Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gilston Road, SW10 Gilston Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Greaves Tower, SW10 Greaves Tower is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Gunter Grove, SW10 Gunter Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Harcourt Terrace, SW10 Harcourt Terrace is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Harley Gardens, SW10 Harley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hobury Street, SW10 Hobury Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Holly Mews, SW10 Holly Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Mews, SW10 Hollywood Mews is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Hollywood Road, SW10 Hollywood Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Hortensia Road, SW10 Hortensia Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Justice Walk, SW3 Justice Walk links Old Church Street and Lawrence Street.
King’s Road, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
Kings Road, SW10 Kings Road stretches from the fashionable SW3 end into the SW10 area.
Lamont Road, SW10 Lamont Road is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Langton Street, SW10 Langton Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Limerston Street, SW10 Limerston Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
London House, SW10 Residential block
Mallord Street, SW3 Mallord Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Manresa Road, SW3 Manresa Road is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Milborne Grove, SW10 Milborne Grove was built between 1851 and 1862.
Milmans Street, SW10 Milmans Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Moravian Place, SW10 Moravian Place is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Mulberry Walk, SW3 Mulberry Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Munro Terrace, SW10 Munro Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Netherton Grove, SW10 Netherton Grove is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Nightingale Place, SW10 Nightingale Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Old Church Street, SW3 Old Church Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Park Walk, SW10 Park Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Park Walk, SW3 Park Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paultons Square, SW3 Paultons Square, a garden square, was built in 1836–40 on the site of a former market garden.
Paultons Street, SW3 Paultons Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Petyt Place, SW3 Petyt Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Priory Walk, SW10 Priory Walk and Milborne Grove both have development on one side of the road only and together they book-end Harley Gardens.
Raasay Street, SW10 Raasay Street ran from Dartrey Road to Edith Grove.
Ramsay Mews, SW3 Ramsay Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redcliffe Place, SW10 Redcliffe Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Redcliffe Road, SW10 Redcliffe Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Riley Street, SW10 Riley Street is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Seymour Walk, SW10 Seymour Walk was almost entirely built between the 1790s-1820s in an area then known as Little Chelsea.
Shalcomb Street, SW10 Shalcomb Street is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
Slaidburn Street, SW10 Slaidburn Street is a street in London
South Walk, SW10 South Walk is a road in the SW10 postcode area
St Lukes Church Hall, SW10 St Lukes Church Hall is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
The Courtyard, SW3 The Courtyard is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
The Little Boltons, SW10 The Little Boltons - originally called "The Grove" - connects Old Brompton Road with Tregunter Road.
The Vale, SW3 The Vale is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Tregunter Road, SW10 Development began at the east end of Tregunter Road in 1851 and was complete by 1866 at the west end.
Trident Place, SW3 Trident Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Upper Whistler Walk, SW10 This is a street in the SW10 postcode area
West Road, SW10 West Road is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Whistler Walk, SW10 Whistler Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.
World’s End Passage, SW10 World’s End Passage is a road in the SW10 postcode area
Worlds End Place, SW10 Worlds End Place is one of the streets of London in the SW10 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Azteca This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Beaufort House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Goat This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Raffles Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Riley’s This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Sporting Page This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Cadogan Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Kings Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Pig’s Ear This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 507 completed street histories and 46993 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
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The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
TUM image id: 1526047056
Licence:
Elm Park Gardens
TUM image id: 1573064988
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Chelsea Farm in the days of Countess Huntindon
Credit: Kensington and Chelsea Libraries
Licence: CC BY 2.0


The Dancing Platform at Cremorne Gardens (1864) In the 17th century, Chelsea Farm was formed and the area was used for market gardening plots, supplying central London. In 1778, Lord Cremorne bought Chelsea Farm and Cremorne House was built. In 1830 Charles Random de Berenger, a colourful character implicated in financial fraud during the Napoleonic War, purchased Cremorne House. He was a keen sportsman and opened a sports club know as Cremorne Stadium for ‘skilful and manly exercise’ including shooting, sailing, archery and fencing. In 1846, De Berenger’s Cremorne Stadium was transformed into a pleasure garden which became a popular and noisy place of entertainment. The entertainment included a diverse range of activities including concerts, fireworks, balloon ascents, galas and theatre.
Credit: Phoebus Levin
Licence:


Elm Park Gardens
Licence: CC BY 2.0


24-hour potato service on the King’s Road, Chelsea (1962)
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Boys and girls kick a ball around a quiet Uverdale Road, Chelsea (early 1960s). The road is now filled with parked cars and a gated playground. Just down the road from major bomb sites, this was one of a cluster of streets that became a ghost town in the wake of the Blitz
Credit: John Bignell
Licence:


Old Battersea Bridge, Walter Greaves (oil on canvas, 1874) Old Battersea Bridge, seen from upstream, on Lindsey Row (now Cheyne Walk), with Battersea on the far shore. The boatyard belonging to the Greaves family is in the foreground. On the extreme left is the wall surrounding the garden of the artist William Bell Scott. In the far distance Crystal Palace is just visible. Battersea Bridge was demolished in 1881, and replaced with the present bridge. Before the alterations Greaves recalled the danger to shipping and the difficulty of steering through the arches unless the ‘set of the tide was known’.
Credit: Tate Gallery
Licence:


Graffiti, Raasay Street, Chelsea (1969).
Credit: Roger Perry
Licence: CC BY 2.0


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