Canonbury Villas, N1

Buildings in this area date from the nineteenth century or before

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2000

Canonbury Villas is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.

A lot of the street information research on this website is academic in nature - from university research, the Survey of London, British History Online, borough conservation areas and more. Occasionally, the Hive Mind comes up trumps - these derivations come from discoveries on the Wikipedia made during 2019 which is feeding into the project.

If we find any derivations dubious here, we remove them. With that proviso, the TUM project provides them here for your enjoyment...

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Mabledon Place – after Mabledone in Kent, home county of local 16th century landowner Andrew Judd [Bloomsbury]
Macclesfield Bridge – after George Parker, 4th Earl of Macclesfield, chairman of the Regent’s Canal Company in the 17th century [Regent’s Park]
Macclesfield Road – after George Parker, 4th Earl of Macclesfield, chairman of the canal company in the 17th century [Finsbury]
Macclesfield Street – after Charles Gerard, 1st Earl of Macclesfield, local landowner in the 17th century [Chinatown]
MacFarren Place – after George Alexander Macfarren, composer and principal at the nearby Royal Academy of Music [Regent’s Park]
Macklin Street – after Charles Macklin, 18th century actor [Covent Garden]
Mackworth Street – after Thomas Mackworth, local landowner who is buried nearby; it was formerly Rutland Street, after John Manners, Marquess of Granby (also Duke of Rutland), but was changed in 1938 to avoid confusion with several other similarly named streets [Regent’s Park]
Maddox Street – after the local Maddox estate, purchased by William Maddox in the 1620s [Mayfair]
Magdalen Street – after either William Waynflete, Bishop of Winchester in the 15th century, who attended Magdalen College, Oxford, [28] or a 13th-century church here called St Mary Magdalen [Southwark]
Magpie Alley – after a former inn here of this name [City of London]
Maida Vale – took its name from a public house named after John Stuart, Count of Maida, which opened on the Edgware Road soon after the Battle of Maida in 1806 [Lisson Grove]
Maiden Lane – not known, but thought to be from a shop of inn containing the word ‘maiden’ that formerly stood here; the names dates to 1636 [72] [83], or perhaps after midden heaps [Covent Garden]
Malet Place – after Sir Edward Baldwin Malet, 4th Baronet, husband of Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of local landowner Francis Russell, 9th Duke of Bedford [Bloomsbury]
Malet Street Camden Sir Edward Malet Married to Lady Ermyntrude Sackville Russell, daughter of Francis Russell, 9th Duke of Bedford who owned much of the surrounding area.
Mallory Street – this land was in Medieval times owned by the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem; the street is named Robert Mallory, Grand Prior 1433–40 [Lisson Grove]
Mallow Street – after the former mallow field located here [Finsbury]
Malta Street – unknown, though probably by association with the nearby Monastic Order of the Knights Hospitallers of St John of Jerusalem (also Knights of Malta); formerly Queen Street [Clerkenwell]
Maltraver’s Street – buily on the site of the former Arundel House; one of the 16th century earls of Arundel was Henry Fitzalan who was also Baron Maltravers [Holborn]
Manchester Mews, Manchester Square and Manchester Street – after Manchester House (now Hertford House) which stood here, home to the dukes of Manchester, built 1776 [Marylebone]
Manciple Street – after the character of the manciple in Geoffrey Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, by reference to the adjacent Pilgrimage Street [Southwark]
Mandela Street Camden Nelson Mandela The street was originally called Selous Street, after Frederick Selous, a game hunter in South Africa who was born in the area. The street in the 1960s became the base of the Anti-Apartheid Movement and in 1985 it was renamed in honour of the then imprisoned ANC leader, who nine years later would become South Africa's first democratically elected president.
Mandeville Place – after the duke of Manchester as above, also known as Viscount Mandeville [Marylebone]
Manette Street – after the Manette family in Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, part of which is set on this street [Soho]
Manoel Road Richmond upon Thames King Manoel II of Portugal Last king of Portugal, home: nearby demolished Fulwell Park House from 1910 (the year of the Portuguese Revolution) until death, 1932. Manoel is the Portuguese spelling.
Mansell Street – named after either local landowner Sir William Leman, 2nd Baronet for his wife Mary Mansell [356] or Mansel Leman, also a local property owner in the 17th century [City of London]
Mansfield Mews – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Mansfield Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Mansion House Place and Mansion House Street – after the adjacent Mansion House [City of London]
Maple Place – after local Victorian-era councillor John Maple [Fitzrovia]
Maple Street – after local Victorian-era councillor John Maple [Fitzrovia]
Marble Arch – after the Marble Arch erected here in 1851 [Mayfair]
Marchmont Street – after Hugh Hume-Campbell, 3rd Earl of Marchmont, governor of the nearby Foundling Hospital [Bloomsbury]
Margaret Court and Margaret Street – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, daughter of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Fitzrovia]
Margaret Street – after Margaret Bentinck, Duchess of Portland, daughter of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Marylebone]
Margery Street – after a family member of local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton; it was formerly Margaret Street [Clerkenwell]
Marigold Alley – after a former 18th century inn here called the Marygold, possibly named for the flower, symbol of Mary I [Waterloo]
Mark Lane – unknown, though possibly a corruption of ‘Martha’; formerly known as Martlane and Marke Lane [City of London]
Market Court and Market Place – after the Oxford Market, opened here in 1732 [Fitzrovia]
Market Mews – after the former Shepherd Market near here [Mayfair]
Marlborough Court – after John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, 17th – 18th century general [Soho]
Marlborough Road – after the adjacent Marlborough House, built for Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough in 1711 [St James's]
Marshall Street – built in the 1730s by the Earl of Craven, whose seat was at Hampstead Marshall, Berkshire [Soho]
Marshalsea Road – after the former Marshalsea Prison here [Southwark]
Marsham Street – after Sir Robert Marsham, who inherited this land from Sir Richard Tufton in the 17th century [Westminster]
Martin Lane – after the former St Martin Orgar church, demolished (save for the tower) in 1820 [City of London]
Martlett Court – thought to be a corruption of St Martin's, from St Martin-in-the-Fields church [Covent Garden]
Marylebone High Street – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church; the first church was built on the bank of a small stream called the Tyburn. [Marylebone]
Marylebone Lane – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church (1817); the original church was built on the bank of a small stream or bourne, called the Tybourne or Tyburn. This stream rose further north in what is now Swiss Cottage, eventually running along what is now Marylebone Lane, which preserves its curve within the grid pattern. The church and the surrounding area later became known as St Mary at the Bourne which, over time, became shortened to its present form, Marylebone. [Marylebone]
Marylebone Mews – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church; the first church was built on the bank of a small stream called the Tyburn. [Marylebone]
Marylebone Passage – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church (1817); the original church was built on the bank of a small stream or bourne, called the Tybourne or Tyburn. This stream rose further north in what is now Swiss Cottage, eventually running along what is now Marylebone Lane, which preserves its curve within the grid pattern. The church and the surrounding area later became known as St Mary at the Bourne which, over time, became shortened to its present form, Marylebone. [Fitzrovia]
Marylebone Road – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church; the first church was built on the bank of a small stream called the Tyburn. [Marylebone]
Marylebone Street – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church; the first church was built on the bank of a small stream called the Tyburn. [Marylebone]
Mason’s Arms Mews – after the nearby Mason's Arms pub [Mayfair]
Mason’s Avenue – after the Worshipful Company of Masons, whose headquarters formerly stood here [City of London]
Mason's Yard – after the local 18th century victualler Henry Mason; it was formerly known as West Stable Yard [42] [St James's]
Matthew Parker Street – after Matthew Parker, archbishop of Canterbury 1559-75; it was formerly Bennett Street, as Corpus Christi College, Cambridge (nicknamed Bennett College) owned land here [Westminster]
Maunsel Street – after John Maunsel (or Mansell), local 13th century landowner and adviser to King Henry III [Westminster]
Mayfair Place – after the May Fair that was formerly held here in the 17th – 18th centuries [Mayfair]
Mays Court – after Henry May, local property owner in the 18th century, built by his family after his death [Covent Garden]
Maysoule Road Wandsworth Rev. Israel May Soule From 1838, Minister of the Baptist Chapel in Battersea; originally called May Soule Road.
Meadow Mews – after the former meadows here attached to Caron House [Vauxhall]
Meadow Road – after the former meadows here attached to Caron House [Vauxhall]
Meard Street Westminster John Meard, the younger Carpenter, later esquire, who developed it in the 1720s and 1730s.
Mecklenburgh Place – after Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife George III, reigning monarch when the square was built [Bloomsbury]
Mecklenburgh Square – after Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife George III, reigning monarch when the square was built [Bloomsbury]
Mecklenburgh Street – after Queen Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, wife George III, reigning monarch when the square was built [Bloomsbury]
Medburn Street - Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, who gave part of his land at Medburn Farm, Hertfordshire for the endowment of Aldenham School [Somers Town]
Medway Street – after the Medway in the Diocese of Rochester, where the deans of Westminster were bishops from 1663 – 1802 [Westminster]
Melbourne Place – after Melbourne in Australia, as the Australian High Commission in on this site [Holborn]
Melcombe Place – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Melcombe, Somerset where they owned land [Lisson Grove]
Melcombe Street – this land was formerly owned by the Portman estate; this street is named for Melcombe, Somerset where they owned land [Lisson Grove]
Melior Place – after Melior May Weston, local 18th century property owner [Southwark]
Melior Street – after Melior May Weston, local 18th century property owner [Southwark]
Memel Court – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Memel was a timber exporting port in Germany (now Klaipeda in Lithuania) [Finsbury]
Memel Street – the streets here were built by a timber merchant circa 1810 who named them after trade-related activities; Memel was a timber exporting port in Germany (now Klaipeda in Lithuania) [Finsbury]
Menelik Road Camden Menelik II of Ethiopia The road was built on the estate of the Powell-Cotton family, one of which, Major Percy Powell-Cotton, was given permission by Emperor Menelik to hunt in Ethiopia in 1900.
Mepham Street – after a 14th Century Archbishop of Canterbury Simon Mepeham [Waterloo]
Mercer Street – after the Worshipful Company of Mercers, who owned a field near here in the 14th century; it was formerly Little White Lion Street [Covent Garden]
Meredith Street – after John Meredith, local landowner and member of the Worshipful Company of Skinners, who owned much of the surrounding land [Clerkenwell]
Merlin Street – after a former local pub, the New Merlin’s Cave after a local landowner of this name [Clerkenwell]
Mermaid Court – after a former inn here of this name [Southwark]
Merrick Square – after local 17th century landowner Christopher Merrick [Southwark]
Meymott Street – after the Meymott family, several of whom were stewards of Paris Gardens manor in the 19th century [Waterloo]
Middle New Street – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
Middle Temple Lane – after the adjacent Middle Temple [City of London]
Middlesex Passage – formerly Middlesex Court, thought to be after Middlesex House which formerly stood here [City of London]
Middlesex Street – as this street forms the boundary of the City with the county of Middlesex, with the alternative name Petticoat Lane stemming from the clothes market formerly held here; prior to 1602 it was known as Hog Lane after the animal [City of London]
Midhope Street – possibly for directors of the East End Dwellings Company who developed these streets in the 1890s [Bloomsbury]
Midland Road – after the adjacent railway line, built by the Midland Railway Company; part was formerly Skinner Street, on the Skinners' Company's Estate [Somers Town]
Mile End Road E1 - The first milestone from the Roman Wall at Aldgate stood near to Stepney Green and the Mile End Road.
Milford Lane – origin unknown, though possibly from a Thames mill located on this site in former times [Holborn]
Milk Street – after the milk and dairy trade that formerly occurred here in connection with the nearby Cheapside market [City of London]
Mill Street – after a windmill that formerly stood here next to the Tyburn brook [Mayfair]
Millbank SW1 - From the fourteenth centuary Westminster Abbey mill that stood at the junction of Great college street, and begun as a riverside walk from the Abbey to Chelsea.
Millennium Bridge – as it was built to commemoration the 2000 millennium [City of London]
Millman Mews – after local 17th century landowner William Millman [Bloomsbury]
Millman Place – after local 17th century landowner William Millman [Bloomsbury]
Millman Street – after local 17th century landowner William Millman [Bloomsbury]
Milner Square N1 - Thomas Milner (1806-84) an active politician and friend of Disraeli and Charles Dickens owned many acres of Islington.
Milton Court – after an early 19th century lease owner of this name, or possibly the poet John Milton; prior to this it was Grub/Grubbe Street, after the former owner, or perhaps to a 'grube' (drain) [City of London]
Milton Street Islington Mr. Milton Carpenter and builder who in 1830, at the time of the name change, owned the building lease of the street at the time. The street was previously known as Grub Street
Mincing Lane – after ‘minchins/mynecen’, a term for the nuns who formerly held property here prior to 1455 [City of London]
Minera Mews – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave), who owned land in Minera, Wales [Belgravia]
Miniver Place – after the type of fur fur, named by connection with the nearby Skinner's Hall [City of London]
Minories – after a former church/convent here of the Little Sisters (Sorores Minores) nuns [City of London]
Mint Street – after a Tudor-era royal mint located here [Southwark]
Mitchell Street – after John Mitchell, who bequeathed this land to the Worshipful Company of Ironmongers in 1527 [Finsbury]
Mitre Square – after the former Mitre Inn which stood near here [City of London]
Mitre Street – after the former Mitre Inn which stood near here [City of London]
Molyneux Street – presumably after Molyneux Shuldham, 18th century naval officer [Marylebone]
Monck Street – after Henry Monck, 18th century benefactor to the local parish [Westminster]
Monkwell Square – after the former street here also of this name, variously recorded as Mogwellestrate or Mukewellestrate, and thought to refer to a well owned by one Mucca [City of London]
Monmouth Street – after James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth, son of Charles II who owned a house on nearby Soho Square; it was formerly two street – Great and Little St Andrew’s Street [Covent Garden]
Montagu Mews North, Montagu Mews South, Montague Mews West, Montagu Place, Montagu Square, Montagu Street and Upper Montagu Street – after Montagu House which formerly stood near here and was home to prominent 18th century figure Elizabeth Montagu [Marylebone]
Montague Close – after Montague House formerly located here, named for Anthony Browne, 1st Viscount Montagu [Southwark]
Montague Place – after Montagu House, built in the 1670 for Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu, which was formerly on the site of the British Museum [Bloomsbury]
Montague Street – after Montagu House, built in the 1670 for Ralph Montagu, 1st Duke of Montagu, which was formerly on the site of the British Museum [Bloomsbury]
Montreal Place – after Montreal in Canada [Holborn]
Montrose Place – as this lay near a house owned by the Dukes and Duchesses of Montrose [Belgravia]
Monument Street – after the nearby Monument to the Great Fire of London [City of London]
Moor Lane – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here [City of London]
Moor Place – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here [City of London]
Moorfield Highwalk – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here [City of London]
Moorfields – after the marshy moorlands that formerly stood here [City of London]
Moorgate – after the gate, leading to the marshy moorlands beyond, that formerly stood here [City of London]
Moorgate Place – after the gate, leading to the marshy moorlands beyond, that formerly stood here [City of London]
Mora Street – after the prebend of Moor/Mora, belonging to St Paul’s Cathedral, named for the local moors [Finsbury]
Moreland Street – after the Moreland family, prominent locally in the 19th century [Finsbury]
Moreton Place – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land near Moreton Morrell, Warwickshire [Victoria]
Moreton Street – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land near Moreton Morrell, Warwickshire [Victoria]
Moreton Terrace – after Henry Wise, local 18th century landowner and gardener to William III, who owned land near Moreton Morrell, Warwickshire [Victoria]
Morley Street – after Samuel Morley, benefactor of the Old Vic in the 1880s [Waterloo]
Mornington Crescent Camden Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington His daughter Anne married Henry Fitzroy, brother of the 1st Baron Southampton, on whose estate the road was built.
Mornington Place Camden Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington His daughter Anne married Henry Fitzroy, brother of the 1st Baron Southampton, on whose estate the road was built.
Mornington Street - after Richard Wellesley, 1st Marquess Wellesley, Earl of Mornington, noted 18th - 19th century statesman [Regent’s Park]
Mornington Terrace Camden Garret Wesley, 1st Earl of Mornington His daughter Anne married Henry Fitzroy, brother of the 1st Baron Southampton, on whose estate the road was built.
Morocco Street – named for the local Morocco leather industry [Southwark]
Morpeth Terrace – after George William Frederick Howard, 7th Earl of Carlisle, Viscount Morpeth, who was chiefly responsible for local development in the 1850s [Westminster]
Mortimer Market – after the market formerly on this site, founded by Hans Winthrop Mortimer in 1768 [Bloomsbury]
Mortimer Street – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, who inherited the estate via his marriage to Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer in 1713 [Fitzrovia]
Mortimer Street Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer Developer of Cavendish Square in London, and the streets around it, from 1715. Amongst his titles were Earl of Oxford and Mortimer, and Baron Harley of Wigmore Castle. He inherited the estate via his marriage to Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer in 1713 [Marylebone]
Morton Place - after John Morton, Archbishop of Canterbury 1486-1500, by connection with the nearby Lambeth Palace [Lambeth]
Morwell Street – after Morwell in Devon, where local landowners the dukes of Bedford held land [Bloomsbury]
Motcomb Street – after local landowners the Grosvenors (titled Viscounts Belgrave); Richard Grosvenor, 2nd Marquess of Westminster owned land in Motcombe, Dorset [Belgravia]
Mount Mills – after a former mount here supporting a windmill, later a chapel, and then in the Civil War a raised battery; it was levelled in 1750 [Finsbury]
Mount Pleasant – ironically named after a former nearby refuse tip [Clerkenwell]
Mount Row – built over the former Mount Field, from the former Oliver’s Mount fortification built here by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War [Mayfair]
Mount Street – built over the former Mount Field, from the former Oliver’s Mount fortification built here by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War [Mayfair]
Mount Street Mews – built over the former Mount Field, from the former Oliver’s Mount fortification built here by Oliver Cromwell during the English Civil War [Mayfair]
Moxon Street – after the former Moxon apartment block on this street; prior to 1936 it was ‘Paradise Street’, after an old burial ground near here – it was changed to avoid confusion with other streets of this name [Marylebone]
Mulready Street – after 18th – 19th century artist William Mulready [Lisson Grove]
Munster Square – after the future William IV, Earl of Munster, brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Muscovy Street – after the Muscovy Company of Elizabethan times, or the Russian merchants formerly based here [City of London]
Museum Street – after the British Museum to which it leads [Covent Garden]
Myddelton Passage, Myddelton Square and Myddelton Street – after Hugh Myddleton, who devised the New River scheme in the early 17th century [Clerkenwell]
Myddelton Square Islington Sir Hugh Myddelton Founder of the New River Company, who developed the square
Mylne Street – after Robert Mylne, who did much engineering work for the New River Company, as did his son William Chadwell Mylne [Clerkenwell]
Nag’s Head Court – after a former inn of this name [Finsbury]
Naoroji Street – after Dadabhai Naoroji, who was active in local politics in the late 19th century [Clerkenwell]
Nash Street – after John Nash, architect of the terraces around Regent’s Park [Regent’s Park]
Nassau Street – after the House of Nassau, who had local connections and married into the Georgian royal family [Fitzrovia]
Neal Street and Neal's Yard – after Thomas Neale, who laid out the Seven Dials development in 1693; Neal Street was formerly King Street, and Neal’s Yard formerly King’s Head Court [Covent Garden]
Neathouse Place – after either an early settlement here of small cottages dubbed ‘neat houses’, or the Neate, a medieval manor located in Pimlico, stemming from a word meaning 'islet' [Pimlico]
Nelson Passage – after Admiral Horatio Nelson [Finsbury]
Nelson Road Merton Nearby streets commemorate Admiral Horatio Nelson and those most famously connected to him. Nelson owned the land on which road was later built.
Nelson Square – after Admiral Horatio Nelson [Southwark]
Netley Street – possibly after Netley in Hampshire [Regent’s Park]
New Bond Street – after Thomas Bond, member of the consortium that developed the local area in the late 17th century; ‘New’ comes from the extension of the then ‘Bond Street’ northwards in the early 18th century [Mayfair]
New Bridge Street – named in 1765 as it leads to the then new Blackfriars Bridge [City of London]
New Broad Street – simply a descriptive name, dating to the early Middle Ages; the northernmost section was formerly ‘New Broad Street’; however, this has now switched onto an adjacent sidestreet [City of London]
New Burlington Mews – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
New Burlington Place – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
New Burlington Street – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
New Cavendish Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
New Change Passage – formerly Old Change, and named for a former mint and gold exchange here [City of London]
New Change, New Change Passage and Old Change Court – formerly Old Change, and named for a former mint and gold exchange here [City of London]
New Charles Street – as this formerly led to a Charles Street, named for Charles II [Finsbury]
New Compton Street – as with Old Compton Street which extends to the west, it is believed to be named after Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s [St Gile's]
New Court – built circa 1700 and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
New Fetter Lane – formerly Fewter Lane, a Medieval term for an idler, [stemming originally from the Old French 'faitour' (lawyer) [City of London]
New Globe Walk – after the Globe Theatre [Southwark]
New Inn Passage – as this formerly led to the New Inn, one of the Inns of Chancery [Holborn]
New Kent Road – as this formed the traditional route down to Kent; the ‘New’ section dates from 1751, and is an extension of the Old Kent Road [Southwark]
New London Street – named after local 18th century property owner John London, not the city; the ‘New’ section was a later extension [City of London]
New North Street – as it leads northwards from Red Lions Square, ‘New’ so as to contract with Old North Street which continues southwards [Bloomsbury]
New Oxford Street – built as an extension of Oxford Street in 1845-47 [Covent Garden]
New Oxford Street – built as an extension of Oxford Street in 1845-47 [St Gile's]
New Row – formerly New Street, built in 1635-37 as a new replacement for an existing alley [Covent Garden]
New Spring Gardens Walk – after the former Vauxhall Gardens here [Vauxhall]
New Square – named simply as it was new when first built by Henry Serle [Holborn]
New Square Passage – named simply as it was new when first built by Henry Serle [Holborn]
New Street – named simply as it was new when first built [City of London]
New Street Court – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
New Street Square – built in the mid-1600s, and named simply because it was then new [City of London]
New Union Street – named as it united Moor Lane and Moorfields; it was formerly Gunn Alley [City of London]
Newbury Street – formerly New Street, renamed 1890 to avoid confusion with other streets of this name [City of London]
Newcastle Close – either after a former inn called the Castle located here, [387] or after the city, with reference to the coal trade here [City of London]
Newcastle Row – after Newcastle House, which formerly stood here; the house was named after its 17th century owner William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle [Clerkenwell]
Newcomen Street – after the local Newcomen Charity, named for its 17th century founder; it was formerly King Street, after a local inn of this name [Southwark]
Newgate Street – after a new gate built here in the 1000s; the eastern part of this street was formerly Bladder Street, after the bladder selling trade here [City of London]
Newington Butts – Newington is now almost obsolete name for the Elephant and Castle area; it means ‘new village/farmstead’ and dates to the early Middle Ages. The ‘Butts’ refers either archery butts or just bits of land [Lambeth]
Newington Causeway – Newington is a now almost obsolete name for the Elephant and Castle area; it means ‘new village/farmstead’ and dates to the early Middle Ages [Southwark]
Newington Court – Newington is a now almost obsolete name for the Elephant and Castle area; it means ‘new village/farmstead’ and dates to the early Middle Ages [Southwark]
Newman Passage, Newman Street and Newman Yard – after Newman Hall in Quendon, Essex, owned by local property owner William Berners [Fitzrovia]
Newman’s Court – after Lawrence Newman, who lease land here from the [ [ in the 17th century [City of London]
Newman’s Row – after Arthur Newman, who built the street in the mid-1600s [Holborn]
Newport Court – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on this street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road, Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today [Chinatown]
Newport Place – after Mountjoy Blount, Earl of Newport (Isle of Wight), who owned a house on this street (then just Newport Street) in the 17th century. Following the construction of Charing Cross Road, Newport Street was split in two and the two sections renamed as they are today [Chinatown]
Newton Street – after William Newton, who built the street and the nearby Lincoln’s inn Fields in the 1630s [Covent Garden]
Newton Street Camden Isaac Newton Scientist and mathematician
Niagara Avenue Ealing Charles Blondin Tightrope walker and acrobat, who lived and died at nearby Niagara House in Northfields. Commemorates Niagara Falls where Blondin performed his most famous tightrope walk in 1859.
Nicholas Lane and Nicholas Passage – after the former St Nicholas Acons church, destroyed in the Great Fire [City of London]
Nine Elms Lane – after a row of nine elm tress which formerly stood along this lane [Vauxhall]
Noble Street – after Thomas de Noble, local 14th century property developer [City of London]
Noel Street – after Lady Elizabeth Noel, who developed the estate on behalf of her son William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland [Soho]
Norman Street – after bricklayer William Norman, who leased land here in the 1750s [Finsbury]
Norris Street – after Godfrye Norris, local leaseholder in the 17th century [St James's]
North Audley Street – after Mary Davies, heiress to Hugh Audley, who married Sir Thomas Grosvenor, thereby letting the local land fall into the Grosvenors' ownership [Mayfair]
North Bank – after a former crescent of villas of this name, demolished to build the adjacent railway lines in the 1890s [Lisson Grove]
North Gower Street - after Gertrude Leveson-Gower, wife of local landowner John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford; it is the northern extension of Gower Street [Regent’s Park]
North Mews – after Lord North, Prime Minister [Bloomsbury]
North Row – after its location as the northern-most street on the Grosvenor estate [Mayfair]
Northampton Road, Northampton Row and Northampton Square – after local landowners (dating back to the 17th century) the Compton family, earls and later marquises of Northampton [Clerkenwell]
Northburgh Street – after Michael de Northburgh, a bishop who founded the nearby Charterhouse monastery in 1371 [Clerkenwell]
Northcourt – named in 1776 for the Prime Minister Lord North [Fitzrovia]
Northington Street – after Robert Henley, 1st Earl of Northington, Lord Chancellor 1761–66 [Bloomsbury]
Northumberland Alley – after Northumberland House, house of the Earls of Northumberland, which formerly stood here [City of London]
Northumberland Avenue Westminster Dukes of Northumberland The Avenue was built in the 1870s on the site of Northumberland House, the redundant, demolished home of the Duke of Northumberland
Northumberland Crescent Hounslow Duke of Northumberland's River The so-called river, a surface level aqueduct, adjoins and is back-named after Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland and his successors who maintained the canal, his wife's direct forebear re-inherited much of the land of the borough in 1594. The family continues to own Syon House.
Northumberland Street – site of the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland [Westminster]
Northwick Close – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for John Rushout, 2nd Baron Northwick, a governor of the school in the 1800s [Lisson Grove]
Northwick Terrace – this land was formerly owned by Harrow School; this street was named for John Rushout, 2nd Baron Northwick, a governor of the school in the 1800s [Lisson Grove]
Norton Folgate – the former word a corruption of ‘North Town’, and the latter after the local Folgate family [City of London]
Norwich Street – unknown; formerly Norwich Court, and prior to that Magpie Yard, probably from a local inn [City of London]
Notting Hill W11 - Known as Knottynghull in the 14th century, to Noding Hill in 1680. The manor which stood here in the 11th century was part of the estates of the De Veres. The only street name to survive is Notting Hill Gate, which passes over the site of an early turnpike gate.
Nottingham Court – after Heneage Finch, 1st Earl of Nottingham, who owned a house nearby in the 17th century [Covent Garden]
Nottingham Place – after Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Nottingham Street – after Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Marylebone]
Nottingham Terrace – after Nottinghamshire, where local landowners the dukes of Portland owned property [Regent’s Park]
Nun Court – thought to be after a local builder/property owner [City of London]
Nutford Place – after Nutford in Dorset, where the local Portman family owned land [Marylebone]
O’Meara Street – after Daniel O’Meara, priest at St George's Cathedral, Southwark [Southwark]
Oak Tree Road – after former land nearby called Oak Tree Field [Lisson Grove]
Oakey Lane – after J Oakey & Son, owner of a Victorian-era emery paper manufacturers near here [Lambeth]
Oakley Square – as this land was formerly owned by Dukes of Bedford, who also owned land in Oakley, Bedfordshire [Somers Town]
Oat Lane – as oats were formerly sold here in the Middle Ages [City of London]
Ogle Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Viscount Mansfield, Baron Ogle, father-in-law of local landowner Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer [Fitzrovia]
Old Bailey – after a bailey fortification that formerly stood here [City of London]
Old Barge House Alley – this was the former location of the royal barges during Tudor times and after [Waterloo]
Old Barrack Yard – as this approached a former barracks located on Wilton Place [Belgravia]
Old Billingsgate Walk – after the former watergate of this name, the derivation of ‘Billings’ in unknown [City of London]
Old Bond Street – after Thomas Bond, member of the consortium that developed the local area in the late 17th century; ‘New’ comes from the extension of the then ‘Bond Street’ northwards in the early 18th century [Mayfair]
Old Brewer’s Yard – presumably after an old brewery here [Covent Garden]
Old Broad Street – simply a descriptive name, dating to the early Middle Ages; the northernmost section was formerly ‘New Broad Street’; however, this has now switched onto an adjacent sidestreet [City of London]
Old Buildings and Old Square – gained this name after the building of New Square in 1682 [Holborn]
Old Burlington Street – after the local Burlington estate, property of the earls of Burlington [Mayfair]
Old Cavendish Street – after Henry Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, father of Henrietta Harley, Countess of Oxford and Countess Mortimer, who married Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer, landowner [Marylebone]
Old Change Court – formerly Old Change, and named for a former mint and gold exchange here [City of London]
Old Compton Street – as with New Compton Street which extends to the east, it is believed to be named after Henry Compton, Bishop of London in the 1670s [Soho]
Old Fish Street Hill – after the former local fish trade here, centred on Billingsgate Fish Market [City of London]
Old Fleet Lane – after the now covered river Fleet which flowed near here [City of London]
Old Gloucester Street – after Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, son of Queen Anne; the street was formerly just ‘Gloucester Street’ until 1873 [Bloomsbury]
Old Jewry – after a Saxon-era settlement of Jews here, thought to be termed ‘Old’ following the Edict of Expulsion of all Jews from England by Edward I [City of London]
Old Marylebone Road – from a church dedicated to St Mary, represented now by St Marylebone Parish Church; the first church was built on the bank of a small stream called the Tyburn. [Marylebone]
Old Mitre Court – after a former tavern of this name here [City of London]
Old North Street – as it leads northwards from Red Lions Square, ‘Old’ so as to contract with New North Street which continues northwards [Holborn]
Old Palace Yard – after the former Old Palace of Westminster, where the Houses of Parliament now stand [Westminster]
Old Paradise Street – after a former burial ground (‘paradise’) located here [Lambeth]
Old Pye Street – after Robert Pye, local MP in the mid-17th century [Westminster]
Old Queen Street – as it approaches Queen Anne’s Gate, or possibly after Elizabeth I; it was formerly just Queen Street [Westminster]
Old Seacole Lane – thought to be after the coal trade that came from the sea and up the river Fleet here [City of London]
Old Street – after its age, thought to have ultimately Roman origins [Finsbury]
Opal Street – unknown; formerly Pleasant Row [Lambeth]
Orange Street – after the William III, Prince of Orange, reigning king when thus street was built. The western section between Haymarket and St Martin’s Street was formerly called James Street, after James II [Soho]
Orchard Street – after Orchard Portman in Somerset, where the local Portman family owned property [Marylebone]
Orchardson Street – after Victorian era artist and local resident William Quiller Orchardson [Lisson Grove]
Orde Hall Street – after Orde Hall, 19th century chairman representing this area at the Metropolitan Board of Works [Bloomsbury]
Orient Street - presumably with reference to the other compass-point related streets here [Lambeth]
Orleans Road Richmond upon Thames Louis Philippe I, previously Duke of Orleans French royal, later king, who lived in exile at Orleans House near the road
Ormond Avenue Richmond upon Thames Earls of Ormond Owned the land on which the roads were later built.
Ormond Close – thought to commemorate James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, prominent 17th century soldier [Bloomsbury]
Ormond Mews – thought to commemorate James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, prominent 17th century soldier [Bloomsbury]
Ormond Road, Hampton Earls of Ormond Owned the land on which the roads were later built, the Richmond one first (1761-1778), the Hampton ones in the borough later.
Ormond Road, Richmond upon Thames Earls of Ormond Owned the land on which the roads were later built, the Richmond one first (1761-1778), the Hampton ones in the borough later.
Ormond Yard – after James Butler, 1st Duke of Ormonde, who owned a house next to this yard in the 17th century [St James's]
Ormonde Place – probably after the Dukes of Ormonde, who owned Ormonde House in Chelsea [Belgravia]
Osbert Street – after Osbert of Clare, Suffolk, prior of the abbey of St Peter’s, Westminster in the 1130s [Westminster]
Osnaburgh Street – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, Prince-Bishopric of Osnabrück (Osnaburgh in English), brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Osnaburgh Terrace – after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, Prince-Bishopric of Osnabrück (Osnaburgh in English), brother of the Prince Regent (George IV) [Regent’s Park]
Ossington Buildings – after Charlotte, Viscountess Ossington, local landowner and heiress to the Cavendish-Harley estate [Marylebone]
Ossulton Street – named in 1807 in memory of the Saxon-era hundred of Ossulton, thought to be named after a stone boundary marker at Tyburn (now Marble Arch) erected by one Oswulf/Oswald [Somers Town]
Outram Road Croydon Group of five roads built on the site of the East India Company Military Seminary by the British Land Company, and named after prominent figures in the history of British India. Outram was a general in India during the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
Outwich Street – after either Oteswich/Ottewich, meaning ‘Otho’s dwelling’, a name for this area of London in the early Middle Ages or the former St Martin Outwich church, named for the Outwich family, demolished 1874 [City of London]
Oval Way – after the adjacent Oval Cricket Ground [Vauxhall]
Owen Street and Owen’s Row – after Dame Alice Owen, who founded almshouses near here in 1609 [Clerkenwell]
Oxendon Street – after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby [Soho]
Oxford Circus – after Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer who owned much of the local estate; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch. Circus is a British term for a road junction; it was formerly Regent Circus, after Regent Street [Soho]
Oxford Court – after a former house here owned by the Earls of Oxford [City of London]
Oxford Street Westminster Edward Harley, 2nd Earl of Oxford and Earl Mortimer Developer of Cavendish Square in London, and the streets around it, from 1715; prior to this it was known as Tyburn Road, as it led to the Tyburn gibbet at what is now Marble Arch [Fitzrovia]
Oystergate Walk – after a watergate here, and the oyster trade [City of London]


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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY


Comment
Steven Shepherd   
Added: 4 Feb 2021 14:20 GMT   

Our House
I and my three brothers were born at 178 Pitfield Street. All of my Mothers Family (ADAMS) Lived in the area. There was an area behind the house where the Hoxton Stall holders would keep the barrows. The house was classed as a slum but was a large house with a basement. The basement had 2 rooms that must have been unchanged for many years it contained a ’copper’ used to boil and clean clothes and bedlinen and a large ’range’ a cast iron coal/log fired oven. Coal was delivered through a ’coal hole’ in the street which dropped through to the basement. The front of the house used to be a shop but unused while we lived there. I have many more happy memories of the house too many to put here.

Reply

Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 13:49 GMT   

Swift House, N16
Swift House was completed in 1956. I moved into No 12 when it was brand new. The bock consisted of 12 residences. The six on the ground floor were three bedroomed maisonettes with gardens. The six on the top floor were a mixture of two bedroomed flats (2), one bedroomed flats (2) and what were then called "one unit" flats (2) which were in fact bedsits. There was a similar block opposite named Dryden House (all the flats on the Hawksley Court Estate were named after famous writers). It was a lovely flat which my Mum & Dad cherished, having moved from two rooms which they’d had since they were married.

Reply
Comment
Lena    
Added: 18 Mar 2021 13:08 GMT   

White Conduit Street, N1
My mum, Rosina Wade of the Wade and Hannam family in the area of Chapel Street and Parkfield Street, bought her first “costume” at S Cohen’s in White Conduit Street. Would have probably been about 1936 or thereabouts. She said that he was a small man but an expert tailor. I hope that Islington Council preserve the shop front as it’s a piece of history of the area. Mum used to get her high heel shoes from an Italian shoe shop in Chapel Street. She had size 2 feet and they would let her know when a new consignment of size 2 shoes were in. I think she was a very good customer. She worked at Killingbacks artificial flower maker in Northampton Square and later at the Halifax bombers factory north of Edgware where she was a riveter.

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 16:18 GMT   

Owen’s School
Owen Street is the site of Owen’s Boys’ School. The last school was built in 1881 and was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for the development which stand there today. It was a “Direct Grant” grammar school and was founded in 1613 by Dame Alice Owen. What is now “Owen’s Fields” was the playground between the old school and the new girls’ school (known then as “Dames Alice Owen’s School” or simply “DAOS”). The boys’ school had the top two floors of that building for their science labs. The school moved to Potters Bar in Hertfordshire in 1971 and is now one of the top State comprehensive schools in the country. The old building remained in use as an accountancy college and taxi-drivers’ “knowledge” school until it was demolished. The new building is now part of City and Islington College. Owen’s was a fine school. I should know because I attended there from 1961 to 1968.

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 20 Mar 2021 15:44 GMT   

Memories of "The Londesborough"
I lived in Sandbrook Road from 1956 until 1964 and then in Harcombe Road until 1994. “The Londesborough” was my local in my formative drinking years.

It was a pub typical of its time. Clean and tidy and well run by a proper guv’nor who stood no nonsense. It had a single island bartop serving three separate bars. The Public Bar had its door on the corner of Londesborough Road and had a dart board. The other two shared a single entrance on the right as you look at the pub. The Saloon bar formed the majority of the pub and was the most plush. It extended to the back of the premises with the back portion – at a slightly lower level – housing a full size snooker table. The small Private bar was between the other two. I recall that prices were a penny or two more in the Saloon bar.

The first landlord I remember was Bob Baker. He and his wife Else ran the pub until about 1969-ish. Bob was a retired coalminer from Leicester. He had two daughters - Penny and Jane – who would very occasionally work behind the bar. Bob had a full time live-in barman/cellarman by the name of Gwyn Evans, who could be a bit temperamental at times! My Dad also worked there from time to time and I recall being invited upstairs to watch the 1961 FA Cup Final between Spurs and Leicester City. Following Bob’s retirement Lou Levine and his wife Pearl took the helm. Lou was a fine guv’nor and the pub flourished under his tenancy. When I left the area I believe Lou still had the tenancy but had put a manager, whose name I cannot recall, in overall charge.

Saturday evening and Sunday lunchtimes the pub was packed. But it also had a good patronage during the week. Among the occasional visitors was Eric Bristow, the late world champion darts player. Eric would challenge the locals to a game and would even things up a bit by throwing his darts from the kneeling position! Footballer and former England manager Terry Venables could also be found there from time to time as one of his pals was the son of Lou’s business partner.

The pub has certainly gone upmarket (as has that small area) but I will take issue with one claim made on its website: “In the 1960’s, the Londesborough was one of the pubs that the notorious Kray Twins took a drink in.” My Dad knew just about everybody who “took a drink” in the Londesborough in the 1960s and Bob Baker knew absolutely everybody. We often spoke about the Kray twins (their “manor” was the other side of Stoke Newington High Street). No mention of them visiting the pub was ever made by them or any other of the locals. One other slight correction: the map on this website is slightly incorrect. The pub is on the corner of Londesborough Road and Barbauld Road, and not as indicated.

The pub had one big drawback. It was a "Watneys" Pub. But you can’t have everything!

Source: The Londesborough

Reply
Comment
Jeff Owen   
Added: 19 Mar 2021 15:28 GMT   

Galsworthy Terrace, N16
Galsworthy Terrace was opposite Swift House, where I lived from 1956 to 1964. My pal Roger Beamish lived at No 1, just adjacent to the slope which joins Sandbrook Road to Woodlea Road. When I first lived there the plot that now accommodates Stowe House was a rock garden containing a wide flight of steps and a sloped pathway. Other occupants of Galsworthy Terrace were the Lake family, good friends with my Mum, and the Walker family. Mr Walker ran the Hawksley Court Tenants’ Club for many years and he would organise an annual "beano" usually to Margate.

Reply
Born here
Vanessa Whitehouse   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 22:48 GMT   

Born here
My dad 1929 John George Hall

Reply
LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
old lady   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 11:58 GMT   

mis information
Cheltenham road was originally
Hall road not Hill rd
original street name printed on house still standing

Reply
Comment
Patricia Bridges   
Added: 19 Jul 2021 10:57 GMT   

Lancefield Coachworks
My grandfather Tom Murray worked here

Reply
Lived here
Former Philbeach Gardens Resident   
Added: 14 Jul 2021 00:44 GMT   

Philbeach Gardens Resident (Al Stewart)
Al Stewart, who had huts in the 70s with the sings ’Year of the Cat’ and ’On The Borders’, lived in Philbeach Gdns for a while and referenced Earl’s Court in a couple of his songs.
I lived in Philbeach Gardens from a child until my late teens. For a few years, on one evening in the midst of Summer, you could hear Al Stewart songs ringing out across Philbeach Gardens, particularly from his album ’Time Passages". I don’t think Al was living there at the time but perhaps he came back to see some pals. Or perhaps the broadcasters were just his fans,like me.
Either way, it was a wonderful treat to hear!

Reply
Lived here
David James Bloomfield   
Added: 13 Jul 2021 11:54 GMT   

Hurstway Street, W10
Jimmy Bloomfield who played for Arsenal in the 1950s was brought up on this street. He was a QPR supporter as a child, as many locals would be at the time, as a teen he was rejected by them as being too small. They’d made a mistake

Reply
Comment
Added: 6 Jul 2021 05:38 GMT   

Wren Road in the 1950s and 60s
Living in Grove Lane I knew Wren Road; my grandfather’s bank, Lloyds, was on the corner; the Scout District had their office in the Congregational Church and the entrance to the back of the Police station with the stables and horses was off it. Now very changed - smile.

Reply

fariba   
Added: 28 Jun 2021 00:48 GMT   

Tower Bridge Business Complex, S
need for my coursework

Source: university

Reply
Lived here
Kim Johnson   
Added: 24 Jun 2021 19:17 GMT   

Limehouse Causeway (1908)
My great grandparents were the first to live in 15 Tomlins Terrace, then my grandparents and parents after marriage. I spent the first two years of my life there. My nan and her family lived at number 13 Tomlins Terrace. My maternal grandmother lived in Maroon house, Blount Street with my uncle. Nan, my mum and her brothers were bombed out three times during the war.

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963–65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Collins’ Music Hall Collins’ Music Hall was a notable Islington venue.
Islington Islington grew as a sprawling Middlesex village along the line of the Great North Road, and has provided the name of the modern borough.

NEARBY STREETS
Abbotts Close, N1 Abbott’s Close was built off of Alwyne Road in 1955.
Aberystwyth Terrace, N1 Aberystwyth Terrace was a named terrace at the junction of New North Road and Shepperton Road.
Almeida Street, N1 Almeida Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Alwyne Lane, N1 Alwyne Lane is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Place, N1 Alwyne Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Road, N1 Alwyne Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Alwyne Villas, N1 Alwyne Villas is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Anderson Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Arran Walk, N1 Arran Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Ashby Grove, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Ashby House Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Barnsbury Street, N1 Barnsbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Barnston Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Basier Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Basire Street, N1 Basire Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Battishill Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bennet Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Bentham Court, N1 Bentham Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Bishop Street, N1 Bishop Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Bouton Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Braes Street, N1 Braes Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Brampton House, N1 Residential block
Britannia Row, N1 Britannia Row is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Caldy Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canon Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canonbury Business Centre, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Canonbury Crescent, N1 Canonbury Crescent is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Grove, N1 Canonbury Grove is a road in the N1 postcode area
Canonbury Lane, N1 Canonbury Lane is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Road, N1 Canonbury Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Square, N1 Canonbury Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Canonbury Street, N1 Canonbury Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cardigan Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Church Road, N1 Church Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Clare Lane, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Cobble Lane, N1 Cobble Lane is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Coleman Fields, N1 Coleman Fields is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
College Cross, N1 College Cross is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Collins Yard, N1 Collins Yard is so-named as it ran alongside the Collins’ Music Hall giving access to the rear of the hall.
Compton Avenue, N1 Compton Avenue is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Compton Terrace, N1 Compton Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Coopers Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Copford Walk, N1 Copford Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Cross Street, N1 Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dagmar Passage, N1 Dagmar Passage is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Dagmar Terrace, N1 Dagmar Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Dengie Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Dibden Street, N1 Dibden Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Douglas Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Draper Place, N1 Draper Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ecclesbourne Road, N1 Ecclesbourne Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Edward’s Cottages, N1 Edward’s Cottages is a road in the N1 postcode area
Edwards Mews, N1 Edwards Mews is a road in the N1 postcode area
Elder Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Epstein Court 27a Road, N1 Epstein Court, within the N1 postcode
Eric Fletcher Court Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Eric Fletcher Court, N1 Eric Fletcher Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Essex Road, N1 Robert Devereux, Earl of Essex, had a country house here in the sixteenth century where he often entertained Queen Elizabeth I.
Essex Road, N1 Essex Road is a road in the N1P postcode area
Esther Anne Place, N1 Esther Anne Place is a location in London.
Evelyn Dennington Court, N1 Evelyn Dennington Court is a block in Islington.
Fairstead Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Florence Street, N1 Florence Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Florence Works, N1 Florence Works is a road in the N1 postcode area
Fowler Road, N1 Fowler Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gaskin Street, N1 Gaskin Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gibson Square, N1 Gibson Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Greenman Street, N1 Greenman Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Gulland Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Halliford Street, N1 Halliford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Cross Street, N1 Halton Cross Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Halton Road, N1 Halton Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Haslam Close, N1 Haslam Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Haven Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hawes Street, N1 Hawes Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Hawkwell Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Hedingham Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Henley Heights 351e, N1 Henley Heights 351e is a location in London.
Holland Passage, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Horse Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islay Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islington House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islington Park Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Islington Park Street, N1 Islington Park Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Islington Park Street, N1 This is a street in the N7 postcode area
James Morgan Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Laundry Lane, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Lindsey Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Mary Street, N1 Mary Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Maryland Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Melville Place, N1 Melville Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Milner Place, N1 Milner Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Milner Square, N1 Thomas Milner (1806-84) was a politician and a friend of Benjamin Disraeli and Charles Dickens
Mitchell House, N1 Residential block
Moon Street, N1 Moon Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Morton Road, N1 Morton Road is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Napier Terrace, N1 Napier Terrace is a road in the N1 postcode area
Naver House, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Nightingale Road, N1 Nightingale Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Northampton Street, N1 Northampton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Old Royal Free Square, N1 Old Royal Free Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Oransay Road, N1 Oransay Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Orchard Close, N1 Orchard Close is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Packington Street, N1 Packington Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Square, N1 Peabody Square is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Peabody Yard, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Peacock Place, N1 Peacock Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Peldon Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Pied Bull Yd, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Pleasant Place, N1 Pleasant Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Popham Road, N1 Popham Road is a street in London
Popham Street, N1 Popham Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Prebend Street, N1 Prebend Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Price House, N1 Residential block
Providence Court, N1 Providence Court is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Providence Place, N1P Providence Place lies beside the Screen On The Green.
Purley Place, N1 Purley Place is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Queens Head Street, N1 Queens Head Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Queensbury Street, N1 Queensbury Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Raleigh Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rawreth Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Raynor Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rector Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Red House Square, N1 Red House Square is a road in the N1 postcode area
Richmond Grove, N1 Richmond Grove is a road in the N1 postcode area
Ridgewell Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
River Place Health Centre, N1 River Place Health Centre is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
River Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Rotherfield Street, N1 Rotherfield Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Rydon Street, N1 Rydon Street is a road in the N1 postcode area
Sable Street, N1 Sable Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Sebbon Street, N1 Sebbon Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shelley Place, N1 Shelley Place is a location in London.
Shepperton House, N1 Residential block
Shillingford Street, N1 Shillingford Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Shrubbery Close, N1 Shrubbery Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Southwood Smith Street, N1 Southwood Smith Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Spellbrook Walk, N1 Spellbrook Walk is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Spencer Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
St Albans Place, N1 St Albans Place was home to a famous Islington strong man.
St. Mary’s Path, N1 St. Mary’s Path is a road in the N1 postcode area
Steeple Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Studd Street, N1 This is a street in the N1 postcode area
Terling Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Terretts Place, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
The Ivories, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
The Mews, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Theberton Street, N1 Theberton Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Tibberton Square, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tibberton Street, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tower Court, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tressel Close, N1 Tressel Close is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tressell Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Tyndale Lane, N1 Tyndale Lane is a road in the N1 postcode area
Tyndale Terrace, N1 Tyndale Terrace is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Upper Caldy Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Dengie Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Hawkwell Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Rawreth Walk, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Street, N1 Upper Street begins at the junction of Pentonville Road and City Road, runs northwards past Angel, splits at Islington Green, ending at Highbury Corner.
Wakelin House, N1 Residential block
Walters House Road, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Water Tower Place, N1 Water Tower Place is a road in the N1 postcode area
Waterloo Gardens, N1 Waterloo Gardens is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Waterloo Terrace, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
Wicks Place, N1 Wicks Place is a location in London.
Willow Bridge Road, N1 Willow Bridge Road is a road in the N1 postcode area
Windsor Street, N1 Windsor Street is one of the streets of London in the N1 postal area.
Wontner Close, N1 A street within the N1 postcode

NEARBY PUBS
Almeida Theatre This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Bar Prague This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Central Station This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Compton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Cote Cote is a licenced premise on Islington Green.
Dead Doll’s House This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
DogEatDog This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Duchess of Kent This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Four Sisters This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Fox on the Green The Fox on the Green is one of Islington’s oldest pubs.
Hoxley and Porter This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
John Salt This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Kings Head This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Lucky Voice This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Marquess Tavern This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Myddleton Arms This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
New Rose This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Tap Room This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Bull This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Hope And Anchor This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The London Cocktail Club This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Smokehouse This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
The Vineyard This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.
Wenlock & Essex This pub existed immediately prior to the 2020 global pandemic and may still do so.


Queen’s Park

Queen’s Park lies between Kilburn and Kensal Green, developed from 1875 onwards and named to honour Queen Victoria.

The north of Queen’s Park formed part of the parish of Willesden and the southern section formed an exclave of the parish of Chelsea, both in the Ossulstone hundred of Middlesex. In 1889 the area of the Metropolitan Board of Works that included the southern section of Queen’s Park was transferred from Middlesex to the County of London, and in 1900 the anomaly of being administered from Chelsea was removed when the exclave was united with the parish of Paddington. In 1965 both parts of Queen’s Park became part of Greater London: the northern section - Queen’s Park ’proper’ formed part of Brent and the southern section - the Queen’s Park Estate - joined the City of Westminster.

Queen’s Park, like much of Kilburn, was developed by Solomon Barnett. The two-storey terraced houses east of the park, built between 1895 and 1900, typically have clean, classical lines. Those west of the park, built 1900–05, tend to be more Gothic in style. Barnett’s wife was from the West Country, and many of the roads he developed are named either for places she knew (e.g. Torbay, Tiverton, Honiton) or for popular poets of the time (e.g. Tennyson). The first occupants of the area in late Victorian times were typically lower middle class, such as clerks and teachers. Queen’s Park is both demographically and architecturally diverse. The streets around the park at the heart of Queen’s Park are a conservation area.

There is hardly any social housing in the streets around Queens Park itself, and the area was zoned as not suitable for social housing in the 1970s and 1980s as even then house prices were above average for the borough of Brent, which made them unaffordable for local Housing Associations. The main shopping streets of Salusbury Road and Chamberlayne Road have fewer convenience stores and more high-value shops and restaurants. Local schools – some of which struggled to attract the children of wealthier local families in the past – are now over-subscribed. House prices have risen accordingly.

Queen’s Park station was first opened by the London and North Western Railway on 2 June 1879 on the main line from London to Birmingham.

Services on the Bakerloo line were extended from Kilburn Park to Queen’s Park on 11 February 1915. On 10 May 1915 Bakerloo services began to operate north of Queen’s Park as far as Willesden Junction over the recently built Watford DC Line tracks shared with the LNWR.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Highbury Corner
TUM image id: 1489497654
Licence: CC BY 2.0
The Angel, Islington (c.1890)
TUM image id: 1557162442
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

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The exterior of the Agricultural Hall in Islington (1861).
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Highbury Corner
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The Camden Head, Islington This is a glorious old gin palace-style pub behind Upper Street, in existence since the 18th century.
Credit: Flickr/Ewan Munro
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Collins Theatre of Varieties (Collins’ Music Hall) existed in Islington between 1861 and 1958. Old-time ’greats’ who performed there were numerous: Charles Chaplin, Fred Karno, Kate Carney, Gus Elen, Sir George Robey, Marie Lloyd, Albert Chevalier, Nellie Wallace, Sir Harry Lauder, ’Wee’ Georgie Wood and more.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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Islington Green (1905). That is Upper Street, leading to Highbury Corner. To the right of the green but just out of the picture would be Essex Road (formerly Lower Road)
Old London postcard
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Upper Street, Highbury c.1900
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Collins’ Music Hall (burnt down 1958) in Islington.
Credit: Wiki Commons
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