Chalton Street, NW1

Road in/near Somers Town, existing between 1793 and now

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.53035 -0.13077) 

Chalton Street, NW1

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · Somers Town · NW1 ·
JUNE
26
2018

Chalton Street was formerly Charlton Street.

Until 1800, the whole of the Somers Town area (the triangular space between the Hampstead, Pancras, and Euston Roads) was almost exclusively pastoral. With the exception of a few straggling houses near the "Mother Red Cap," at Camden Town, and also a few roundabout the old church of St. Pancras, there was nothing to interrupt the view of the Hampstead uplands from Queen’s Square and the Foundling Hospital.

Mr Jacob Leroux became the principal landowner under Lord Somers. The former built a handsome house for himself, and various streets were named from the title of the noble lord.

Jacob Leroux (c.1737-1799) was born in Convent Garden. In 1766 he was employed by Francis and William Goodge to supervise the development of their estate near Tottenham Court Road. In 1768 Leroux was engaged by Isaac Mallorie and John Carnac to design their planned Polygon development in Southampton - an ambitious scheme designed to match the new, genteel buildings of other spa towns like Bath and Tunbridge Wells.

In 1793 Leroux erected a second Polygon, with the same layout as that planned in Southampton, on the Somers estate. This scheme fared rather better than the Southampton Polygon, but was similarly not fully completed.

Charlton Street was laid out with barracks for the Life Guards regiment. It continued north as Union Street and Stibbington Street before these were renamed and combined as "Chalton Street".

Gradual advances were made on the north side of the New Road (now the Euston Road), from Tottenham Court Road, and, finally, the buildings on the south side reached the line of Gower Street. The gap between Southampton Place and Somers Town was soon one vast brick-field. The barracks in Charlton Street, became covered by Clarendon Square.

The Company of Skinners owned thirty acres of land which covered the north side of the New Road from Somers Place to Battle Bridge (Kings Cross) which then became when built Skinner Street, Judd Street and Tonbridge Place and other streets.

In Chalton Street, a public house was built - the Somers Town Coffee House. Before it was a pub it was the only coffee-house in the neighbourhood. "Early in the last century Somers Town was a delightful and rural suburb, with fields and flowergardens. A short distance down the hill," writes a Mr Larwood in the nineteenth century, "were the then famous Bagnigge Wells, and close by the remains of Totten Hall, with the ’Adam and Eve’ tea-gardens, and the so-called King John’s Palace. At this time the coffee-house was a popular place of resort, much frequented by the foreigners of the neighbourhood as well as by the pleasure-seeking cockney from the distant city. There were near at hand other public-houses and places of entertainment, but the speciality of this establishment was its coffee. As the traffic increased, it became a posting-house, uniting the business of an inn with the profits of a tea-garden. Gradually the demand for coffee fell off, and that for malt and spirituous liquors increased. At present the gardens are all built over, and the old gateway forms part of the modern bar; but there are in the neighbourhood aged persons who remember Sunday-school excursions to this place, and pic-nic parties from the crowded city, making merry here in the grounds."


Main source: Somers Town and Euston Square | British History Online
Further citations and sources




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Ossulston Estate The Ossulston Estate is a multi-storey council estate built by the London County Council in Somers Town between 1927 and 1931.
Rhodes Farm Rhodes Farm was situated on Hampstead Road.
Somers Town Somers Town is a district close to three main line rail termini - Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross.
St. James Gardens St. James Gardens were used as a burial ground between 1790 and 1853.
The 'Royal Blue' horse omnibus outside 5 Euston Road (1912) The bus carries route information and an advert for Selfridge's. The shops behind, including Boots the Chemist, Stewart & Wright's Cocoa Rooms and the Northumberland Hotel, are covered in advertisements.

NEARBY STREETS
Aldenham Street, NW1 Aldenham Street – Richard Platt, 16th century brewer and local landowner, gave land for the endowment of Aldenham School, Hertfordshire.
Ampthill Square, NW1 Ampthill Square is a name which has existed in two different time periods.
Argyle Walk, WC1H Argyle Walk is named for Argyll in Scotland.
Barclay Street, NW1 Barclay Street led from Aldenham Street northwards to Medburn Street.
Barnby Street, NW1 Barnby Street is a street in Camden Town.
Belgrove Street, WC1H Belgrove Street, formerly Belgrave Street, leads south from Euston Road.
Bidborough Street, WC1H Bidborough Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Bridgeway Street, NW1 Bridgeway Street is a street in Camden Town.
Brill Place, NW1 Brill Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cardington Street, NW1 Cardington Street is a rare London street in that it closed for good as late as 2017.
Cartwright Gardens, WC1H Cartwright Gardens is a crescent-shaped park and street located in Bloomsbury.
Centa Housebirkenhead Street, WC1H Centa Housebirkenhead Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Charrington Street, NW1 Charrington Street runs south to north and is a continuation of Ossulston Street.
Chenies Place, NW1 Chenies Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Christopher Place, NW1 Christopher Place is a street in Camden Town.
Church Way, NW1 Church Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Churchway, NW1 Churchway is a street in Camden Town.
Clare Court, WC1H Clare Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Coach Road, N1C Coach Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Cobourg Street, NW1 Cobourg Street is a street in Camden Town.
Cooper’s Lane, NW1 Cooper’s Lane is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Cranleigh Street, NW1 Cranleigh Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Crestfield Street, NW1 Crestfield Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Denton Street, N1C Denton Street disappeared under the construction of St Pancras station.
Doric Way, NW1 Doric Way is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Doric Way, NW1 Doric Way is a street in Camden Town.
Drummond Crescent, NW1 Drummond Crescent is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Drummond Street, NW1 Drummond Street was the original site of Euston Station.
Duke’s Road, WC1H This is a street in the WC1H postcode area
Dukes Road, WC1H Dukes Road is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Elstree Street, N1C Elstree Street once laid off of St Pancras Road.
Endsleigh Gardens, WC1H Endsleigh Gardens is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Euston Road, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Euston Road, NW1 Euston Road runs from Marylebone Road to King's Cross. The road is part of the London Inner Ring Road and forms part of the London congestion charge zone boundary.
Euston Road, WC1H Euston Road is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Euston Square, NW1 This is a street in the NW1 postcode area
Euston Street, NW1 Euston Street is a street in Camden Town.
Eversholt Street, NW1 Eversholt Street is a street in Camden Town.
Flaxman Terrace, NW1 Flaxman Terrace is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Flaxman Terrace, WC1H Flaxman Terrace is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Floor, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Foundry Mews, NW1 Foundry Mews is a road in the NW1 postcode area
George Mews, NW1 George Mews is a street in Camden Town.
Goldington Street, NW1 Goldington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Grafton Place, NW1 Grafton Place is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Gridiron Building, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Hamilton House, WC1H Residential block
Hampden Close, NW1 Hampden Close is a street in Camden Town.
Hampstead Road, NW1 Hampstead Road connects the Euston Road with Camden.
Harrington Square, NW1 Harrington Square is a street in Camden Town.
Hastings Street, WC1H Hastings Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Judd Street, NW1 This is a street in the NW1 postcode area
Judd Street, WC1H Judd Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
King’s Boulevard, N1C King’s Boulevard is a road in the N1C postcode area
King’s Cross Square, N1C King’s Cross Square is a road in the N1C postcode area
King’s Cross Station Concourse, WC1 King’s Cross Station Concourse is a road in the WC1 postcode area
Kings Cross, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Lancing Street, NW1 Lancing Street is a street in Camden Town.
Leigh Street, WC1H Leigh Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Lidlington Place, NW1 Lidlington Place is a street in Camden Town.
Mabledon Place, WC1H Mabledon Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Mayford, NW1 Mayford is a street in Camden Town.
Medway Court, WC1H Medway Court is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Melton Street, NW1 Melton Street is a street in Camden Town.
Midland Road, N1C Midland Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Midland Road, NW1 Midland Road is a street in Camden Town.
North Gower Street, NW1 North Gower Street is a street in Camden Town.
Oakley Square, NW1 Oakley Square is a street in Camden Town.
Oakshott Court, NW1 Oakshott Court is a road in the NW1 postcode area
One Kings Cross, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
One Pancras Square, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
Ossulston Street, NW1 Ossulston Street is a street in Camden Town.
Pancras Road, N1C Pancras Road is a road in the N1C postcode area
Pancras Road, NW1 Pancras Road is a street in Camden Town.
Pancras Square, N1C This is a street in the N1C postcode area
Penryn Street, NW1 Penryn Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Perry Street, N1C Perry Street was buried by St Pancras station.
Phoenix Road, NW1 Phoenix Road is a street in Camden Town.
Polygon Road, NW1 Polygon Road is a street in Camden Town.
Purchese Street, NW1 Purchese Street is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Sandwich House, WC1H Residential block
Sandwich Street, WC1H Sandwich Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Seymour House, NW1 Residential block
Sinclair House, WC1H Residential block
Smith Street, N1C Smith Street was buried under St Pancras station.
Somers Close, NW1 Somers Close is a road in the NW1 postcode area
Speedy Place, WC1H Speedy Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
St. Philip’s Way, N1 A street within the N1C postcode
Starcross Street, NW1 Starcross Street is a street in Camden Town.
Thanet Street, WC1H Thanet Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
The Circle, N1C The Circle is a road in the N1C postcode area
The Gridiron, N1C A street within the N1C postcode
The Polygon The Polygon was a housing estate, a Georgian building with 15 sides and three storeys that contained 32 houses.
Tiger House, WC1H Residential block
Tonbridge Street, WC1H Tonbridge Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Tower Hamlets, E1 A street within the N1 postcode
Upper Woborn Place, WC1H Upper Woborn Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Upper Woburn Place, WC1H Upper Woburn Place is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Wakefield Street, WC1H Wakefield Street is a road in the WC1H postcode area
Watford Street, NW1 Watford Street was cleared away in the 1860s to make way to St Pancras station.
Werrington Street, NW1 Werrington Street is a street in Camden Town.
Whidborne Street, WC1H Whidborne Street is one of the streets of London in the WC1H postal area.
Whittlebury Street, NW1 Whittlebury Street once laid to the west of Euston station.
Wilsted Street, NW1 Wilsted Street was the original name for the lower end of Ossulston Street.
Woburn Walk, WC1H Woburn Walk was also known as Woburn Buildings.
York Road Curve, N1 York Road Curve is a road in the N1 postcode area


Somers Town

Somers Town is a district close to three main line rail termini - Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross.

Historically, the name Somers Town was used for the larger triangular area between the Pancras, Hampstead, and Euston Roads, but it is now taken to mean the rough rectangle bounded by Pancras Road, Euston Road and Eversholt Street.

Somers Town was named after Charles Cocks, 1st Baron Somers (1725–1806). The area was originally granted by William III to John Somers (1651–1716), Lord Chancellor and Baron Somers of Evesham.

In the mid 1750s the New Road was established to bypass the congestion of London; Somers Town lay immediately north of this east-west toll road. In 1784, the first housing was built at the Polygon amid fields, brick works and market gardens on the northern fringes of London. The site of the Polygon is now occupied by a block of council flats called Oakshott Court.

The Polygon deteriorated socially as the surrounding land was subsequently sold off in smaller lots for cheaper housing, especially after the start of construction in the 1830s of the railway lines into Euston, St Pancras and King’s Cross. In this period the area housed a large transient population of labourers and the population density of the area soared. By the late 19th century most of the houses were in multiple occupation, and overcrowding was severe with whole families sometimes living in one room, as confirmed by the social surveys of Charles Booth and Irene Barclay.

When St Luke’s Church, near King’s Cross, was demolished to make way for the construction of the Midland Railway St Pancras Station and its Midland Grand Hotel, the estimated twelve thousand inhabitants of Somers Town at that time were deprived of that place of worship, as the church building was re-erected in Kentish Town. In 1868 the lace merchant and philanthropist George Moore funded a new church, known as Christ Church, and an associated school in Chalton Street with an entrance in Ossulston Street. The school accommodated about six hundred children. Christ Church and the adjacent school were destroyed in a World War II bombing raid and no trace remains today, the site being occupied by a children’s play area and sports court.

Improvement of the slum housing conditions, amongst the worst in the capital, was first undertaken by St Pancras Council in 1906 at Goldington Buildings, at the junction of Pancras Road and Royal College Street, and continued on a larger scale by the St Pancras House Improvement Society (subsequently the St Pancras & Humanist Housing Association, the present owner of Goldington Buildings) which was established in 1924. Further social housing was built by the London County Council, which began construction of the Ossulston Estate in 1927. There remains a small number of older Grade 2 listed properties, mostly Georgian terraced houses.

During the early 1970s the neighbourhood comprising GLC-owned housing in Charrington, Penryn, Platt and Medburn Streets was a centre for the squatting movement.

In the 1980s, some council tenants took advantage of the ’right to buy’ scheme and bought their homes at a substantial discount. Later they moved away from the area. The consequence was an influx of young semi-professional people, resulting in a changing population.

Major construction work along the eastern side of Somers Town was completed in 2008, to allow for the Eurostar trains to arrive at the refurbished St Pancras Station. This involved the excavation of part of the St Pancras Old Churchyard, the human remains being re-interred at St Pancras and Islington Cemetery in East Finchley.

Land at Brill Place, previously earmarked for later phases of the British Library development, became available when the library expansion was cancelled and was used as site offices for the HS1 terminal development and partly to allow for excavation of a tunnel for the new Thameslink station. It was then acquired as the site for the Francis Crick Institute (formerly the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation), a major medical research institute.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Euston Road, NW1
TUM image id: 17780
The British Library
TUM image id: 1482066417
The Polygon, Somers Town in 1850.
TUM image id: 1499354315
St. James Gardens
Credit: Google
TUM image id: 1530005129
Print-friendly version of this page