Cheyne Place, SW3

Road in/near Chelsea

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  ·  MAPS  ·  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.48552 -0.1626, 51.485 -0.162) 
MAP YEAR:175018001810182018301860190019502023Show map without markers
ZOOM:14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18 14 15 16 17 14 15 16 17 18
TIP: To create your own sharable map, right click on the map
Road · Chelsea · SW3 ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Cheyne Place is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.





Click here to explore another London street
We now have 566 completed street histories and 46934 partial histories
Find streets or residential blocks within the M25 by clicking STREETS


CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE LOCALITY

Lived here
   
Added: 1 May 2021 16:46 GMT   

Cheyne Place, SW3
Frances Faviell, author of the Blitz memoir, "A Chelsea Concerto", lived at 33, Cheyne Place, which was destroyed by a bomb. She survived, with her husband and unborn baby.

Reply
Born here
www.violettrefusis.com   
Added: 17 Feb 2021 15:05 GMT   

Birth place
Violet Trefusis, writer, cosmopolitan intellectual and patron of the Arts was born at 2 Wilton Crescent SW1X.

Source: www.violettrefusis.com

Reply
Comment
Peter H Davies   
Added: 17 Jun 2021 09:33 GMT   

Ethelburga Estate
The Ethelburga Estate - named after Ethelburga Road - was an LCC development dating between 1963’65. According to the Wikipedia, it has a "pleasant knitting together of a series of internal squares". I have to add that it’s extremely dull :)

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Reply
Born here
Joyce Taylor   
Added: 5 Apr 2021 21:05 GMT   

Lavender Road, SW11
MyFather and Grand father lived at 100 Lavender Road many years .I was born here.

Reply

Lynette beardwood   
Added: 29 Nov 2022 20:53 GMT   

Spy’s Club
Topham’s Hotel at 24-28 Ebury Street was called the Ebury Court Hotel. Its first proprietor was a Mrs Topham. In WW2 it was a favourite watering hole for the various intelligence organisations based in the Pimlico area. The first woman infiltrated into France in 1942, FANY Yvonne Rudellat, was recruited by the Special Operations Executive while working there. She died in Bergen Belsen in April 1945.

Reply

LATEST LONDON-WIDE CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PROJECT

Comment
Christine D Elliott   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 15:52 GMT   

The Blute Family
My grandparents, Frederick William Blute & Alice Elizabeth Blute nee: Warnham lived at 89 Blockhouse Street Deptford from around 1917.They had six children. 1. Alice Maragret Blute (my mother) 2. Frederick William Blute 3. Charles Adrian Blute 4. Violet Lillian Blute 5. Donald Blute 6. Stanley Vincent Blute (Lived 15 months). I lived there with my family from 1954 (Birth) until 1965 when we were re-housed for regeneration to the area.
I attended Ilderton Road School.
Very happy memories of that time.

Reply

Pearl Foster   
Added: 20 Mar 2023 12:22 GMT   

Dukes Place, EC3A
Until his death in 1767, Daniel Nunes de Lara worked from his home in Dukes Street as a Pastry Cook. It was not until much later the street was renamed Dukes Place. Daniel and his family attended the nearby Bevis Marks synagogue for Sephardic Jews. The Ashkenazi Great Synagogue was established in Duke Street, which meant Daniel’s business perfectly situated for his occupation as it allowed him to cater for both congregations.

Reply
Comment
Dr Paul Flewers   
Added: 9 Mar 2023 18:12 GMT   

Some Brief Notes on Hawthorne Close / Hawthorne Street
My great-grandparents lived in the last house on the south side of Hawthorne Street, no 13, and my grandmother Alice Knopp and her brothers and sisters grew up there. Alice Knopp married Charles Flewers, from nearby Hayling Road, and moved to Richmond, Surrey, where I was born. Leonard Knopp married Esther Gutenberg and lived there until the street was demolished in the mid-1960s, moving on to Tottenham. Uncle Len worked in the fur trade, then ran a pet shop in, I think, the Kingsland Road.

From the back garden, one could see the almshouses in the Balls Pond Road. There was an ink factory at the end of the street, which I recall as rather malodorous.

Reply

KJH   
Added: 7 Mar 2023 17:14 GMT   

Andover Road, N7 (1939 - 1957)
My aunt, Doris nee Curtis (aka Jo) and her husband John Hawkins (aka Jack) ran a small general stores at 92 Andover Road (N7). I have found details in the 1939 register but don’t know how long before that it was opened.He died in 1957. In the 1939 register he is noted as being an ARP warden for Islington warden

Reply

   
Added: 2 Mar 2023 13:50 GMT   

The Queens Head
Queens Head demolished and a NISA supermarket and flats built in its place.

Reply
Comment
Mike   
Added: 28 Feb 2023 18:09 GMT   

6 Elia Street
When I was young I lived in 6 Elia Street. At the end of the garden there was a garage owned by Initial Laundries which ran from an access in Quick Street all the way up to the back of our garden. The fire exit to the garage was a window leading into our garden. 6 Elia Street was owned by Initial Laundry.

Reply
Comment
Fumblina   
Added: 21 Feb 2023 11:39 GMT   

Error on 1800 map numbering for John Street
The 1800 map of Whitfield Street (17 zoom) has an error in the numbering shown on the map. The houses are numbered up the right hand side of John Street and Upper John Street to #47 and then are numbered down the left hand side until #81 BUT then continue from 52-61 instead of 82-91.

Reply
Comment
P Cash   
Added: 19 Feb 2023 08:03 GMT   

Occupants of 19-29 Woburn Place
The Industrial Tribunals (later changed to Employment Tribunals) moved (from its former location on Ebury Bridge Road to 19-29 Woburn Place sometime in the late 1980s (I believe).

19-29 Woburn Place had nine floors in total (one in the basement and two in its mansard roof and most of the building was occupied by the Tribunals

The ’Head Office’ of the tribunals, occupied space on the 7th, 6th and 2nd floors, whilst one of the largest of the regional offices (London North but later called London Central) occupied space in the basement, ground and first floor.

The expansive ground floor entrance had white marble flooring and a security desk. Behind (on evey floor) lay a square (& uncluttered) lobby space, which was flanked on either side by lifts. On the rear side was an elegant staircase, with white marble steps, brass inlays and a shiny brass handrail which spiralled around an open well. Both staircase, stairwell and lifts ran the full height of the building. On all floors from 1st upwards, staff toilets were tucked on either side of the staircase (behind the lifts).

Basement Floor - Tribunal hearing rooms, dormant files store and secure basement space for Head Office. Public toilets.

Geound Floor - The ’post’ roon sat next to the entrance in the northern side, the rest of which was occupied by the private offices of the full time Tribunal judiciary. Thw largest office belonged to the Regional Chair and was situated on the far corner (overlooking Tavistock Square) The secretary to the Regional Chair occupied a small office next door.
The south side of this floor was occupied by the large open plan General Office for the administration, a staff kitchen & rest room and the private offices of the Regional Secretary (office manager) and their deputy.

First Dloor - Tribunal hearing rooms; separate public waiting rooms for Applicants & Respondents; two small rooms used by Counsel (on a ’whoever arrives first’ bases) and a small private rest room for use by tribunal lay members.

Second Floor - Tribunal Hearing Rooms; Tribunal Head Office - HR & Estate Depts & other tennants.

Third Floor - other tennants

Fourth Floor - other tennants

Fifth Floor - Other Tennants except for a large non-smoking room for staff, (which overlooked Tavistock Sqaure). It was seldom used, as a result of lacking any facities aside from a meagre collection of unwanted’ tatty seating. Next to it, (overlooking Tavistock Place) was a staff canteen.

Sixth Floor - Other tennants mostly except for a few offices on the northern side occupied by tribunal Head Office - IT Dept.

Seventh Floor - Other tenants in the northern side. The southern (front) side held the private offices of several senior managers (Secretariat, IT & Finance), private office of the Chief Accuntant; an office for two private secretaries and a stationary cupboard. On the rear side was a small kitchen; the private office of the Chief Executive and the private office of the President of the Tribunals for England & Wales. (From 1995 onwards, this became a conference room as the President was based elsewhere. The far end of this side contained an open plan office for Head Office staff - Secretariat, Finance & HR (staff training team) depts.

Eighth Floor - other tennants.


The Employment Tribunals (Regional & Head Offices) relocated to Vitory House, Kingsway in April 2005.






Reply

V:1

NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
The Fascination of Chelsea The Fascination of Chelsea was a book published in 1902.

NEARBY STREETS
Adair House, SW3 Adair House is a block on Adair House.
Alameda House, SW3 Alameda House is located on Sydney Street.
Alpha Place, SW3 Alpha Place was probably so called because it was the first turning to be built out of the old lane now named Flood Street.
Argyle House, SW3 Argyle House is located on King’s Road.
Britten Street, SW3 Britten Street was probably named after J. Britten, a trustee of St Luke’s Church in 1828.
Burnsall Street, SW3 Burnsall Street was Brewer Street until 1928 and originally part of Blenheim Street
Cadogan Pier, SW3 Cadogan Pier is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Carlyle’s House, SW3 Carlyle’s House is a block on Cheyne Row.
Carriage Drive North, SW3 Carriage Drive North is a road in the SW11 postcode area
Caversham Street, SW3 Caversham Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Charles II Place, SW3 Charles II Place is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Bridge, SW3 Terrace Walk is a pathway within Battersea Park.
Chelsea Embankment, SW3 Chelsea Embankment is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Manor Gardens, SW3 Chelsea Manor Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Chelsea Manor Street, SW3 Chelsea Manor Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Manor Studios, SW3 Chelsea Manor Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Chelsea Towers, SW3 Chelsea Towers are named blocks in Chelsea.
Chesil Court, SW3 Chesil Court can be found on Chelsea Manor Street.
Cheyne Court, SW3 Cheyne Court is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Mews, SW3 Cheyne Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Cheyne Row, SW3 Cheyne Row is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Cheyne Walk, SW3 Cheyne Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Street, SW3 Christchurch Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Christchurch Terrace, SW3 Christchurch Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Clover Mews, SW3 Clover Mews is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Daver Court, SW3 Daver Court is a block on Chelsea Manor Street.
Dilke Street, SW3 Dilke Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
East Road, SW3 East Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Embankment Gardens, SW3 Embankment Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Flood Street, SW3 Flood Street commemorates Luke Thomas Flood (d.1860) a major Chelsea land owner and a benefactor of the poor.
Flood Walk, SW3 Flood Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Franklins Row, SW3 Franklins Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Glebe Place, SW3 Glebe Place was built over a former road called Cooks Ground.
Grove Cottages, SW3 Grove Cottages is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Grove House, SW3 Grove House is a block on Grove Cottages.
Honiton Mansions, SW3 Honiton Mansions is a location in London.
Joubert Mansions, SW3 Joubert Mansions is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Jubilee Place, SW3 Jubilee Place commemorates the Jubilee of George III.
King’s Road, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Lordship Place, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Margaretta Terrace, SW3 Margaretta Terrace is a location in London.
Meriden Court, SW3 Meriden Court is a block on Chelsea Manor Street.
Oakley Gardens, SW3 Oakley Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Oakley Street, SW3 Oakley Street arrived in 1830 following the demolition of Chelsea Manor House in 1822.
Ormonde Gate, SW3 Ormonde Gate is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Paradise Walk, SW3 Paradise Walk is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Phene Street, SW3 Phene Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Pier House, SW3 Pier House is a block on Cheyne Walk.
Porters Lodge, SW3 Porters Lodge is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Queens House, SW3 Queens House is a block on Cheyne Walk.
Radnor Walk, SW3 Radnor Walk was previously called Radnor Street until renamed in 1937.
Ralston Street, SW3 Ralston Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redburn Street, SW3 Redburn Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Redesdale Street, SW3 Redesdale Street is a location in London.
Resedale Street, SW3 Resedale Street is a location in London.
Robinson Street, SW3 Robinson Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rosetti Studios, SW3 Rosetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Rossetti Studios, SW3 Rossetti Studios is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Royal Hospital Road, SW3 Royal Hospital Road is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Shawfield Street, SW3 Shawfield Street is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Shelley Court, SW3 Shelley Court is a block on Tite Street.
Sloane Court West, SW3 This is a street in the SW3 postcode area
Smith Street, SW3 Smith Street was built between 1794 and 1807 by a vintner named Thomas Smith.
Smith Terrace, SW3 Smith Terrace is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
St Leonard’s Terrace, SW3 St. Leonard’s Terrace is situated at the end of Royal Avenue.
St Loo Avenue, SW3 St Loo Avenue was named after William St Loo, the third husband of Bess of Hardwick.
Swan Court, SW3 Swan Court is a block on Flood Street.
Swan Walk, SW3 Swan Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Tedworth Gardens, SW3 Tedworth Gardens is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Tedworth Square, SW3 Tedworth Square is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.
Terrace Walk, SW3 Terrace Walk is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Tite Street, SW3 Tite Street crosses Royal Hospital Road.
Upper Cheyne Row, SW3 Upper Cheyne Row is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Wellington Square, SW3 Wellington Square was laid out in the 1850s by Francis Edwards though the terraces on either side of the square were built some ten years earlier.
West Road, SW3 West Road is a road in the SW3 postcode area
Woodfall Street, SW3 Woodfall Street is one of the streets of London in the SW3 postal area.

NEARBY PUBS
Chelsea Potter The Chelsea Potter was originally called ‘The Commercial Tavern’ and dates from 1842.


Click here to explore another London street
We now have 557 completed street histories and 46943 partial histories


Chelsea

Chelsea is an affluent area, bounded to the south by the River Thames.

Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square tube station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square, along with parts of Belgravia. To the north and northwest, the area fades into Knightsbridge and South Kensington, but it is safe to say that the area north of King’s Road as far northwest as Fulham Road is part of Chelsea.

The word Chelsea originates from the Old English term for chalk and landing place on the river. The first record of the Manor of Chelsea precedes the Domesday Book and records the fact that Thurstan, governor of the King’s Palace during the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042–1066), gave the land to the Abbot and Convent of Westminster. Abbot Gervace subsequently assigned the manor to his mother, and it passed into private ownership. The modern-day Chelsea hosted the Synod of Chelsea in 787 AD.

Chelsea once had a reputation for the manufacture of Chelsea buns (made from a long strip of sweet dough tightly coiled, with currants trapped between the layers, and topped with sugar).

King Henry VIII acquired the manor of Chelsea from Lord Sandys in 1536; Chelsea Manor Street is still extant. Two of King Henry’s wives, Catherine Parr and Anne of Cleves, lived in the Manor House; Princess Elizabeth – the future Queen Elizabeth I – resided there; and Thomas More lived more or less next door at Beaufort House. In 1609 James I established a theological college on the site of the future Chelsea Royal Hospital, which Charles II founded in 1682.

By 1694, Chelsea – always a popular location for the wealthy, and once described as ’a village of palaces’ – had a population of 3000. Even so, Chelsea remained rural and served London to the east as a market garden, a trade that continued until the 19th-century development boom which caused the final absorption of the district into the metropolis.

Chelsea shone, brightly but briefly, in the 1960s Swinging London period and the early 1970s. The Swinging Sixties was defined on King’s Road, which runs the length of the area. The Western end of Chelsea featured boutiques Granny Takes a Trip and The Sweet Shop, the latter of which sold medieval silk velvet caftans, tabards and floor cushions, with many of the cultural cognoscenti of the time being customers, including Keith Richards, Twiggy and many others.

The exclusivity of Chelsea as a result of its high property prices has historically resulted in the term Sloane Ranger to be used to describe its residents. From 2011, Channel 4 broadcast a reality television show called Made in Chelsea, documenting the ’glitzy’ lives of several young people living in Chelsea. Moreover, Chelsea is home to one of the largest communities of Americans living outside of the United States, with 6.53% of Chelsea-residents being born in the United States.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Click here to see map view of nearby Creative Commons images
Click here to see Creative Commons images near to this postcode
Click here to see Creative Commons images tagged with this road (if applicable)
The Fascination of Chelsea
TUM image id: 1524258115
Licence: CC BY 2.0
Petworth Street sign
TUM image id: 1493989872
Licence: CC BY 2.0

In the neighbourhood...

Click an image below for a better view...
Albert Bridge opened in 1873 and was immediately designated as a dangerous structure. It was noticed early on that vibrations could threaten the structural integrity of the bridge.
Credit: The Underground Map
Licence:


The Fascination of Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Tite Street, SW3 (1955) Playing in the street wasn’t an activity confined to Chelsea’s mean streets as this view of Tite Street shows. Baseball is being played here. In spotted dressed and suit trousers, the young (possibly American) boys and girls look dashing as they frolic around under the sun peaking through the trees. Tite Street was formerly home to Oscar Wilde and James McNeill Whistler.
Credit: John Bignell
Licence:


The Sutton Estate, Chelsea was built in 1913.
Credit: Sutton Estate
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Royal Hospital, Chelsea
Licence: CC BY 2.0


Impromptu Dance, a Scene on the Chelsea Embankment (1883)
Credit: Frederick Brown (1851-1941)
Licence:


Print-friendly version of this page

  Contact us · Copyright policy · Privacy policy