Duke Street, SW1Y

Road in/near St James’s

 HOME  ·  ARTICLE  MAP  STREETS  BLOG 
(51.50632 -0.13177, 51.506 -0.131) 

Duke Street, SW1Y

MAP YEAR:1750180018301860190019502020Remove markers
Road · St James’s · SW1Y ·
JANUARY
1
2000

Duke Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.




NEARBY LOCATIONS OF NOTE
Charing Cross Charing Cross denotes the junction of the Strand, Whitehall and Cockspur Street, just south of Trafalgar Square
Northumberland House Northumberland House was a large Jacobean townhouse in London, which was the London residence of the Percy family, the Dukes of Northumberland.
Piccadilly Circus Piccadilly Circus was built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly.
Pickering Place, SW1Y Thought to be the smallest public open space in London, Pickering Place is perhaps most famous for being the location of the last public duel in England.
Royal Society The Royal Society is a self-governing Fellowship of many of the world’s most distinguished scientists drawn from all areas of science, engineering and medicine.
St James’s St James’s is an exclusive area in the West End of London.

NEARBY STREETS
Adelaide Street, WC2N Adelaide Street was named for Queen Adelaide, Consort to King William IV.
Agar Street, WC2N Agar Street is named after George Agar, who built the street in the 1830s with John Ponsonby, Earl of Bessborough
Air Street, SE18 A street within the W1B postcode
Air Street, W1B Air Street’s name is believed to be a corruption of ‘Ayres’, after Thomas Ayre, a local brewer and resident in the 17th century.
Air Street, W1B Air Street was the most westerly street in London when newly built in 1658.
Albany Courtyard, SW1Y The courtyard is named after Prince Frederick, Duke of York and Albany, who in 1791 purchased Melbourne House which stood on this site.
Albany, W1S The Albany is an apartment complex in Piccadilly, divided into apartments in 1802.
Ambassador’s Court, SW1A Ambassador’s Court is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Angel Court, SW1Y Angel Court is named after a long demolished inn of this name.
Apple Tree Yard, SW1Y Apple Tree Yard is thought named after the apple trees formerly to be found here.
Babmaes Street, SW1Y Babmaes Street was originally called Wells Street.
Blue Bridge, SW1A Blue Bridge is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Bray House, SW1Y Residential block
Brydges Place, WC2N Brydges Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Bury Street, SW1A Bury Street runs north-to-south from Jermyn Street to King Street, crossing Ryder Street.
Bury Street, SW1Y Bury Street runs north-to-south from Jermyn Street to King Street, crossing Ryder Street.
C1 Mint Business Park, E16 A street within the E16 postcode
Cannon Street, WC2N Cannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Carlton Gardens, SW1Y Carlton Gardens was developed before 1832.
Carlton House Terrace, SW1Y Carlton House Terrace consists of a pair of terraces - white stucco-faced houses on the south side of the street overlooking St. James’s Park.
Chandos Place, WC2R Chandos Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Charing Cross, SW1A Charing Cross, long regarded as London’s central point, as an address is an enigma.
Charles Ii Street, SW1Y Charles Ii Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Church Place, SW1Y Church Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Cleveland Road, SW1A Cleveland Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Cleveland Row, SW1A Cleveland Row is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Cockspur Street, SW1Y Cockspur Street is possibly after the cock fighting that formerly occurred here, cocks often having spurs attached to their feet during fights.
Community House, E13 A street within the postcode
Coventry Street, W1D Coventry Street is a short street connecting Piccadilly Circus to Leicester Square. On the London Monopoly board, it was named after the politician Henry Coventry, secretary of state to Charles II.
Craven Passage, WC2N Craven Passage is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Craven Street, WC2N Craven Street is named after William Craven, 3rd Baron Craven, who owned the land when the street was built in the 1730s.
Crown Passage, SW1Y Crown Passage is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Dalmeny Court, SW1Y Dalmeny Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Dn, SE1 A street within the postcode
Downing Street, SW1A Downing Street has been the home of British Prime Minsters since the eighteenth century.
Dudley House, W1J Residential block
Duke Of York Street, SW1Y Duke Of York Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Duncannon Street, WC2N Duncannon Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Eagle Place, SW1Y Eagle Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Elmhurstreet Villas, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Fludyer Street, SW1A Fludyer Street used to be a street which lay parallel to, and south of, Downing Street.
French Railways House, W1J Residential block
Fullwood’s Mews, N1 A street within the 77381 postcode
George Court, WC2N George Court is named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.
Germyn Street, SW1Y Germyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Goodwins Court, WC2N Goodwins Court is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
Great Scotland Yard, SW1A Great Scotland Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Haymarket, SE10 A street within the SW1Y postcode
Haymarket, SW1Y Haymarket – site of a former market selling hay until the 1830s.
Hobhouse Court, WC2H Hobhouse Court is named after Sir John Cam Hobhouse, Victorian MP and arts patron.
Horse Guards Avenue, SW1A Horse Guards Avenue is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Horse Guards Parade, SW1A Horse Guards Parade dates to the time of Henry VIII.
Horse Guards Road, SW1A Horse Guards Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Irving Street, WC2H Irving Street is named after Henry Irving, the popular Victorian actor.
Jermyn Street, SW1Y Jermyn Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Jermyn Street, SW1Y Jermyn Street is a road in the SW1A postcode area
King Street, SW1Y King Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Kinnaird House, SW1Y Residential block
London Borough Of Hackney, N1 A street within the N1 postcode
London Borough Of Southwark, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Lower Regent Street, SW1Y Lower Regent Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Lyndhurstreet Grove, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Marlborough Road, SW1A Marlborough Road is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Masons Yard, SW19 A street within the SW1Y postcode
Masons Yard, SW1Y Masons Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
May’s Court, WC2N May’s Court is a road in the WC2N postcode area
New Zealand House, SW1Y Residential block
Norman Shaw Building North, SW1A Norman Shaw Building North is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Norris Street, SW1Y Norris Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Northumberland Avenue, SW1A Northumberland Avenue runs from Trafalgar Square in the west to the Thames Embankment in the east.
Northumberland Avenue, WC2N The part of Northumberland Avenue nearest to Trafalgar Square lies in the SW1 rather than WC2 postcode.
Northumberland Street, WC2N Northumberland Street commemorates the former Northumberland House, built originally in the early 17th century for the earls of Northampton and later acquired by the earls of Northumberland.
Orange Street, SW1Y Orange Street is a road in the SW1Y postcode area
Orange Street, WC2H Orange Street gets its name from William III, Prince of Orange - the reigning king when the street was built.
Ormond Yard, SW1Y Ormond Yard is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Oxendon Street, W1D Oxendon Street, after Sir Henry Oxendon, husband of Mary Baker, daughter of Robert Baker who built the former Piccadilly House nearby.
Pall Mall East, SW1Y Pall Mall East is an eastern extension of Pall Mall towards Trafalgar Square.
Pall Mall, SW1Y Pall Mall is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Panton Street, W1D Panton Street was named after Colonel Thomas Panton, local property dealer of the 17th century.
Pelican Estate, SE15 A street within the SE15 postcode
Piccadilly Arcade, SW1Y Piccadilly Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Piccadilly Arcade, W1J Piccadilly Arcade is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Piccadilly Circus, W1B Piccadilly Circus is a road in the W1B postcode area
Piccadilly Circus, W1J Piccadilly Circus is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Piccadilly Place, W1J Piccadilly Place is one of the streets of London in the W1J postal area.
Piccadilly, SW1Y Piccadilly is a road in the SW1Y postcode area
Piccadilly, W1S Piccadilly is one of the main London streets.
Pickering Place, SW1Y Pickering Place is London’s smallest square.
Princes Arcade, SW1Y Princes Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Queens Gardens, SW1A Queens Gardens is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Richmond House Whitehall, SW1A Richmond House Whitehall is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Richmond Terrace, SW1A Richmond Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Rochford Southend East, SW1A Rochford Southend East is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Rose and Crown Yard, SW1Y Rose and Crown Yard is a road in the SW1Y postcode area
Royal Opera Arcade, SW1Y Royal Opera Arcade is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Russell Court, SW1A Russell Court is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Ryder Street, SW1Y Ryder Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Sackville Street, W1S Sackville Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Saint James’s Place, SW1A This is a street in the SW1A postcode area
Saint James’s Square, SW1Y This is a street in the SW1Y postcode area
Saint James’s Street, SW1A This is a street in the SW1A postcode area
Saint Martin’s Place, WC2N Saint Martin’s Place is a road in the WC2N postcode area
Showing every road so far featured, SW1A A street within the SW1A postcode
Spring Gardens, SW1A Spring Gardens derives its name from the Spring Garden, formed in the 16th century as an addition to the pleasure grounds of Whitehall Palace.
St Albans Street, SW1Y St Albans Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St James Square, SW1Y St James Square is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Jamess Chambers, SW1Y St Jamess Chambers is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Jamess Market, SW1Y St Jamess Market is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
St Jamess Square, SW1Y St James’s Square is the only square in district of St James’s.
St James’s Place, SW1A St James’s Place is a road in the SW1A postcode area
St Margaret Street, SW1A St Margaret Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
St Margarets Street, SW1A St Margarets Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
St Martins Place, WC2H St Martins Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St Martins Place, WC2N St Martins Place is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
St Martins Street, WC2H St Martins Street is one of the streets of London in the WC2H postal area.
St. James’s Drive, SW12 A street within the 78257 postcode
St. Kilda’s Road, N16 A street within the N16 postcode
Stable Yard Road, SW1A Stable Yard Road is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Studio 5, E1 A street within the E1 postcode
Suffolk Place, SE2 Suffolk Place is a road in the SE2 postcode area
Suffolk Place, SW1Y The Earl of Suffolk (Thomas Howard) was the reason for the naming of Suffolk Place.
Suffolk Street, SW1Y Suffolk Street was named after Thomas Howard, Earl of Suffolk, who owned a stable yard attached to Northumberland House which lay on this site.
Swallow Street, W1B Swallow Street honours Thomas Swallow, lessee in 1540 of the pastures on which the road was built.
The Arches, WC2N The Arches is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Gallery, SW1Y The Gallery is a road in the E20 postcode area
The London Pavillion, SW1Y The London Pavilion is a building on Piccadilly Circus.
The Mall, SW1Y The Mall is the processional route between Trafalgar Square and Buckingham Palace.
The National Gallery, WC2N The National Gallery is one of the streets of London in the WC2N postal area.
The Terrace, SW1A The Terrace is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Thunderer Walk, SE18 A street within the postcode
Trafalgar Square, SW1Y Trafalgar Square commemorates Horatio Nelson’s 1805 victory at the Battle of Trafalgar.
Vigo Street, W1S Vigo Street is one of the streets of London in the W1S postal area.
Villiers Street, WC2N Villiers Street was named after George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham
Warwick House Street, SW1Y Warwick House Street is one of the streets of London in the SW1Y postal area.
Waterloo Place, SW1Y Waterloo Place, a broad extension of Regent Street, is awash with statues and monuments that honour heroes and statesmen of the British Empire. It is framed by palatial buildings designed by John Nash, the famed Regency-era architect and Decimus Burton, his protégé.
Westreet Drive, SW16 A street within the SW16 postcode
Whitcomb Street, WC2H Whitcomb Street - named after William Whitcomb, 17th century brewer and property developer.
Whitehall Court, SW1A Whitehall Court is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall Gardens, SW1A Whitehall Gardens is a road in the SW1A postcode area
Whitehall Place, SW1A Whitehall Place is one of the streets of London in the SW1A postal area.
Whitehall, SW1A Whitehall is recognised as the centre of the government of the United Kingdom.
William IV Street, WC2N William IV Street runs from Charing Cross Road to the Strand.
York Place, WC2N York Place marks the location of a house on this site.


St James’s

St James’s is an exclusive area in the West End of London.

St James’s was once part of the same royal park as Green Park and St James’s Park. In the 1660s, Charles II gave the right to develop the area to Henry Jermyn, 1st Earl of St Albans, who proceeded to develop it as a predominantly aristocratic residential area with a grid of streets centered on St James’s Square. Until the Second World War, St James’s remained one of the most exclusive residential enclaves in London. Famous residences in St James’s include St James’s Palace, Clarence House, Marlborough House, Lancaster House, Spencer House, Schomberg House and Bridgewater House.

St James’s is the home of many of the best known gentlemen’s clubs in London. The clubs found here are organisations of English high society. A variety of groups congregate here, such as royals, military officers, motoring enthusiasts, and other groups.

It is now a predominantly commercial area with some of the highest rents in London and, consequently, the world. The auction house Christie’s is based in King Street, and the surrounding streets contain a great many upmarket art and antique dealers.

Office space to rent in St James’s is the most expensive in the world, costing up to five times average rents in New York, Paris and Sydney.

The area is home to fine wine merchants including Berry Brothers and Rudd, at number 3 St James’s Street. Adjoining St James’s Street is Jermyn Street, famous for its many tailors. St James’s is home to some of the most famous cigar retailers in London. At 35 St James’s Street is Davidoff of London, 19 St James’s Street is home to J.J. Fox and 50 Jermyn St has Dunhill; this makes the area a Cuban cigar haven.

The iconic English shoemaker Wildsmith which designed the first ever loafer was located at 41 Duke Street, St, James’s. It is now currently located at 13 Savile Row.

The area has a good number of art galleries, covering a spectrum of tastes. The White Cube gallery, which represents Damien Hirst and Tracey Emin, had originally opened in Duke Street, St James’s, then moved to Hoxton Square. In September 2006, it opened a second gallery in St James’s at 25–26 Mason’s Yard, off Duke Street, on a plot previously occupied by an electricity sub-station. The gallery is the first free-standing building to be built in the St James’s area for more than 30 years.


LOCAL PHOTOS
Waterloo Place (1913)
TUM image id: 1466520232
Entrance to Pickering Place
TUM image id: 1499523671
On This Day in London: 1 November
TUM image id: 1509551019
Print-friendly version of this page